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COIiliEGE flEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume II. 



Annville, Pa., Thursday, September 29, 1910 



fio. 1 



Foot Ball Season Opens 



Lebanon Valley Loses First* Game to 
Indians 

On Wednesday, Sept. 21. our Var- 
sity football team played its initial 
game of the season at Carlisle, having 
the strong Indian team as its opponent. 
Quite a large delegation of students 
cheered the squad as they boarded the 
morning train for Carlisle. 

The Red-skins outweighed our team 
b ' at least fifteen pounds to the man, 
but regardless of this fact, our plucky 
little team fearlessly charged their 
opponents when the opening whistle 
blew. Lebanon Valley kicked off, 
and the Indians received the ball on 
their 35-yard line. Owing to the lack 
of our defensive work, the Indians did 
most of the scoring in the first quarter. 
L. V. held the ball for several downs 
in each quarter, and when the game 
ended they had the ball on the Indians' 
15-yard line, with the score 53-0 in 
the Indians' favor. 

Coach Glenn Warner of the Indians 
said in regards to our boys, "This is 
the best team you ever sent down from 
Lebanon Valley. You played a pluck- 
ier game than I thought you would, 
and under tho new rules, 53-0 is a 
better score than 35-0 last year." 

At present coach Forrest of Lan- 
caster, assisted by Prof. Wanner, is 
putting the team thru a hard daily 
scrimmage, in preparation for the 
Swarthmore game on Saturday. 



Bequests to Lebanon Valley. 

Dr. Daniel Eberly Leaves Several 
Large Gifts 

By the will of the late Daniel Eb- 
erly, of Hanover, Pa., Lebanon Valley 
College receives the income from his 
valuable farms, aud the residue of his 
estate after other bequests shall have 
been paid. 



The larger farm was in fact willed 
to the College by the late Mr. Bitting- 
er, father-in-law of Dr. Eberly, sub- 
ject to the life interest of the latter. 

This is a large farm valued at forty 
thousand dollars, the income of which 
is to be applied to the salary of the 
Josephine Bittinger Eberly Professor 
of the Latin Language and Literature, 
the chair being named in the will. 
The Hanover farm of the late Dr. Eb- 
erly is willed [to the College on con- 
dition that the proceeds only be used 
to assist in defraying expenses of 
worthy students. 

The residue of the estate is to be 
kown as "The Daniel Eberly Fund" 
and the proceeds are to be loaned to 
worthy students. In addition the 
valuable library is also bequeathed to 
the College. 



Faculty Reception 

President KeisLer Entertains Faculty at 
His Residence 

On Saturday evening President and 
Mrs. Keister entertained the members 
of the Faculty and their wives at 
their residence on Sheridan Avenue. 

All were very pleasantly entertain- 
ed with various amusements and pro- 
nounced the affair a great success. 
Those present were : Prof, and Mrs. 
Lehman, Prof, and Mrs. Shenk, Prof, 
and Mrs. Derrickson, Prof, and Mrs. 
Sheldon, Prof, and Mrs. Spessard, 
Miss Dodge, Miss Sleichter, Prof. 
Wanner, Miss Brown, Mrs. John A. 
Eby, Miss Boehm, and Miss Parks. 



Large Freshman Class 

The new Freshman class is the larg- 
est in the history of the college. It 
numbers no less than forty and is 
made up of the representatives of the 
best high schools and Academies of 
Pennsylvania. 



Calendar. 

Thursday, Sept. 29 — Biological 
Field Club, 7 p. m. 

Friday, Sept. 30— Literary Societies, 
7:15 p. m. 

Saturday, Oct. 1— Football team at 
Swarthmore. 

Sunday, Oct. 2— Christian Associa- 
tions, 1 p. m. 

Tuesday, Oct. 4— Students' Prayer 
meeting, 6 p. m. 



Alumni 




The Editors" earnestly request that 
all Alumni take special interest in 
sending to the "News" Alumni notes. 
By so doing the Alumni department 
will be built up and a keener interest, 
will be kept up for our Alma Mater. 

Rev. I. Mover Hershey, '03, pastor 
of Covenant U. B. Church, Lancas- 
ter, Pa., has been confined to his 
home for several weeks with a severe 
attack of typhoid fever. 

J. H. Sprecher, '07, is at present 
principal of the Honey Brook High 
School at Honey Brook, Pa. 

Rev, Jos. Daugherty, '89, of Myers- 
town, Pa., was a visitor at the col- 
lege on Tuesday. 

E. E. Knauss, '07, is an instructor 
in the Middletown High School. 

Stanley R. Oldham, '08, is an in- 
structor in the English department of 
Bates College, JLewiston, Maine. 

D. D. Brandt, '04, is assistant 
principal of the Hershey High School. 

Max F. Lehman, '07, of Annville, 
left on Monday, Sept. 26, for the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. 

Deleth E. Weidler, '09, is teaching 
in the high school at Anderson, In- 
diana. 

Continued on page 3 



O 5 O 



COLLEGE NEAVS 



College flecxis 

Issued weekly during- the College 
Year by Lebanon Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
p. R. koontz, '11 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. A. BRUNNER, '11 

E. A. SPESSARD, '11 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

W. O. ELLIS, '11 

F. R. KENNEDY, '12 
CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, '12 

HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
S. O. GRIMM, '12 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
and PUBLISHER 

ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 

OLIVER BUTTER WICK '12 
PAUL LOSER, '13 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 

Single Copies 5 els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 els. 

Address all business communications 
to J. Walter Esbenshade, Nutting 
Building, Lebanon ; all other matter 
to College News, Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

Although a week has already passed 
since the opening of the College year, 
the Editorial Staff greets the students 
and friends of Lebanon Valley College 
with this issueof the " College News. " 
Owing to a slight difficulty with the 
business management, the "News" is 
appearing a little late. 

Vacation is over, and at the present 
writing, everybody is back to hard 
work. Quite a number of the old 
students did not return this year, but 
we are glad to state that many new 
faces are in evidence around the Col- 
Jege halls and campus. To the new 
students we bid a hearty welcome, 
and invite them to join earnestly in 
all our C illege activities. The l'ter- 
ary societies, christian associations 
and athletics afford opportunities for 
all to engage their spare moments. 
Each of these movements need all the 
available material, and old and new 
students alike are urged to identify 
themselves with some or, if possible, 
all of them for the upbuilding of their 
Alma Mater. 

Doubtless every student came to 
College this fall, determined to get 
the most possible benefit out of his 



course. We admire such a motive in 
everybody, but in order to reach this 
end, above all things, do not be a 
"grind". It is the "grind" that the 
college man despises most of all. 
What he wants is a good student, who 
doss well with his books, but who 
does not hesitate to enter into all col- 
lege functions, and give part of his 
time and energy for the good of the 
College. 

With the opening of this College 
year, the "News" is glad to state that 
Lebanon Valley faces the most prosper- 
ous year in her history. The large 
number of new students, the increas- 
ed interest of Alumni and friends, the 
decrease in the general debt, and the 
bounteous gifts of friends give every- 
thing a very bright outlook. Our 
hope is that these interests may con- 
tinue and that the coming year will 
be the greatest in the history of Leb- 
anon Valley College. 

The late Dr. Eberly was a true 
friend of Lebanon Valley College. 
His bequest, with that of his father- 
in-law, Mr. Bittinger, forms the basis 
of Lebanon Valley's endowment. 
Coming at a time of rejoicing and 
good cheer over the recent successful 
debt effort, it gives new encourage- 
ment to Faculty, students and all con- 
nected with Lebanon Valley College. 

Dr. Eberly attended the meeting of 
the Board of Trustees last June and 
expressed himself as highly gratified 
with the financial management of the 
College. In his death the College 
loses one of her warmest friends. 
But he is not dead. He lives in the 
monuments erected by him in Leba- 
non Valley College. 

In a subsequent issue we shall give 
a sketch of the life of Dr. Eberly. 

New Members of the Faculty. 

Students and friends of the college 
generally will be gratified to learn of 
the high scholastic attainments and 
the successful teaching ability of the 
new members of the faculty. 

Miss Parks who succeeds Mrs. 
Scblichter as Professor of English is 
a graduate of Northwestern Univer- 
sity, and continued her post-graduate 
studies in Columbia Unhersity. Be- 
fore coming to Lebanon Valley Miss 
Parks had won an enviable reputation 



as a teacher of English, the last two 
years hvaing been spent as an instruc- 
tor in Teachers' College, New York. 

Prof. Sheldon comes to us from 
Susquehanna University where he has 
built up the Conservatory of Music of 
that institution. He is an able in- 
structor and his work already bears 
evidence of thoroughness and an ad- 
herence to high standards that argues 
well for the future of the Conserva- 
tory. He is ably assisted by Miss 
Brown as teacher of voice, the same 
position having been held by her in 
the facultv of Susquehanna University. 

Mrs. Sheldon as assistant teacher 
of piano comes to us with a record as 
a successful teacher. 

Fred W. Light, '00, is instructor 
on the violin in the Conservatory of 
Music. He was in town on Tuesday 
and Wednesday in the interest of the 
department. 

Fall Reception 

Christian Associations Entertain New 
Students. 

The first social event of the year 
was the Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. re- 
ception to new students held in the 
Ladies' parlors on Saturday evening, 
Sept. 17. 

Many new students and friends of 
the College took this opportunity to 
get acquainted. Appropriate address- 
es were made by Prfsident Keister and 
Dean Shenk. Mr. J. K. Lehman, 
Chairman of the committee, is to be 
commended for the success of the re- 
ception. Affer the refreshments were 
served, each clasp gave appropriate 
class and college yells. The next re- 
ception of the kind will be held at the 
opening of the Spring term. 

Y. M. C. A. 

On Sunday afternoon Mr. Paul 
Koontz presented the Bible study pro- 
position to the members of the Y. M. 
C. A. in a forcible and earnest 
manner. He pointed out how essent- 
ial Bible study is for the students. 

Messrs. Ehrhart, Grimm and Ricbie 
made remarks on the same topic. Two 
strong poin s were brought out, "Ig- 
norance of the Bible is a Crime and 
Strong Men Study the Bible." 

Hearty Co-operation is Needed in 
order to make this most important 
Phrase of College Life a Success. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROCRAMS 



PHILO PROGRAM 

Foot ball News, Ralph Riegie; 
Mark Twain, Clarence Ulrich ; Debate : 
Resolved that a Co-Educational Insti- 
tution Offers better Advantages for 
Development than Non-co-educational 
Institution; affirmative, Earl Loser 
and J. Edward Marshall, negative, 
F. S. Hensel and E. H. Carmany; 
Piano Duet, E. A. Spetssard, P. R. 
Koontz; Essay, N. B. S. r ihomas. 

Visitors welcome. 

KALO PR OGRAM 

Happenings of the Week, J. A. 
Walters; Essay, P. M. Holdeman ; 
Chorus, Society; Parlimentary Prac- 
tices, led by D. C. Keister and A. S. 
Beckley; Chorus, Society; Orighal 
Story, H. C. Snavely: Reading, J. P. 
Reed; Chorus, Society. 

CLIO PROGRAM 

Instrumental S lo, Anna Fr\ ; 
Reading, Verda Snyder; Book Review, 
Helen Weidler; Instrumental Solo, 
Carrie Light; Are the Colleges doing 
their Duty ? La Verne Keister ; Reading, 
Helen Brightbill; Olive Branch, Edi- 
tor; Chorus, Society. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

Continued from page 1 

Professor and Mrs. Norman C. 
Schlichter have moved to Chailotte, 
North Carolina, where Professor 
Schlichter is engaged in Y. M. C. A. 
work. Both Professor and Mrs. 
Schlichter have been members of the 
College faculty for many years. Pro- 
fessor Schlichter was a graduate of 
the class of 1897. 

J. Walter Esbeshade, '03, is editor 
of the Avnnille Journal and the Pal- 
myra Citizen. 

M. M. Hoover, '06, continued his 
studies in English at Columbia Uni- 
versity last summer, and resumed his 
work at Westfield College in Sep- 
tember. 

C. C. Peters, '05, trofessor of 
Philosophy at Westfield College, 
received the degree of Master of Arts 
from Harward last June. 

Lester Appenzellar, '08, of Cham- 
beriburg, attended the Indian- Villa- 
nova foot ball game at Harrisburg on 
Saturday, Sept. 24. 



George HofTer, '09, is an instructor 
in the Biological department of Pur- 
due University, Lafayette, Indiana. 

George M. Richter, '09, is secretary 
and treasurer of the Student Volun- 
teer Union of Central Ohio. Mr. 
Richter is located at Delta, Ohio. 

Born, Sept. 21, to Dr. H. E. En- 
ders '97, and Mrs. Enders '01, a son. 

Born, a son to Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles H. Fisher. Mr. and Mrs. 
Fisher were both members of class 
of '04. 

Sallie Kreider '08, visited friends 
at the college on Monday. 



Obituary. 

It is with much regret that we have 
to announce the death of Harvey E. 
Herr in our first issue. He was a 
member of the Class of 1911. 
"Hienie" as he was called by the 
boys, was of a genial and friendly 
disposition. He was born on the 17th 
October. 1887 and died August 10, 
1910. He graduated from the North 
Annville High Sshool in 1903, attend- 
ed the Lebanon Business College,, and 
Lebanon Valley Academy. 

His classmates will miss his cheer- 
ful and friendly sympathy. Kaloze- 
tean Literary Society will always 
revere his memory, and a vacant seat 
is there for one who was one of her 
most devoted and loyal members. 
Long may his soul rest in peace. 

Mathematical Round Table 
Holds First Meeting. 

The opening meeting of the Mathe- 
matical tfound Table for the College 
year was held Wednesday evening 
in the college library. This organi- 
zation, under the efficient leader- 
ship of Prof. Lehman, has come to 
to be one of the main interests of the 
College. Live mathematical subjects 
are always discussed, and visitors 
are always welcome to the meetings. 
The followjng program was rendered : 

Current Events in the Mathematical 
World, Miss Horn ; Symbols of Mathe- 
matics. D. C. Keister; Paper, Are 
Mathematical Str?uies more difficult 
than others? S O. Grimm; General 
Discussion. 

The Round Table meets on the last 
Wednesday evening of each month. 



Items of Interest 



Coach H. M. Forrest and W. D. 
Biever, '14, spent part of Tuesday in 
Lebanon. 

Prof. S. H. Derrickson was confin- 
ed to his home on Tuesday due to a 
slight illness. 

Miss Margaret Rigler, a former L. 
V. student, has enrolled as a student 
at Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

P. W. Kreider, ex-'13, left last 
Saturday for New Haven, Conn., 
where he has entered Yale University. 

Russel Weidler, '14, was compelled 
to leave College last week for his 
home at Royalton, owing to a severe 
case of blood poison in his hand. 

Geo. E. Johnson, a former student 
of the Academy, will spend this year 
at Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, 
Pa. 

S. S. Rine left for his home last 
week at Hoffer, Pa. Mr. Rine was 
afflicted with inflammatory rheuma- 
tism. 

Dr. J. P. Landis, president of Bone- 
brake Theological Seminary, address- 
ed the siudent body at chapel on Mon- 
day morning. 

E. E. Eby, a former L. V. stu- 
dent, is at present a student at Penn- 
sylvania State College. 

Miss Rhoda Brandt, of Hummels- 
town, is spending some time at the 
Ladies' Hall as the guest of her sister, 
Miss Mary Sleichter. 

P. M. Holdeman. '11, was an im- 
portant witness in the Jennings trial 
for involuntary manslaughter in Leb- 
anon last week. 

averio Rosato, ex-'ll, who was 
taking private work here during the 
summer, has left for Ann Arbor, 
Mich., where he has entered the law 
department of the Univeristy of 
Michigan. 

Roger B. Savior, '11, who attended 
the summer sessions of Columbia Uni- 
versity, is an instructor in the I'h/sics 
department of the College. 

Miss Louisa Kreider, ex-'13, left 
last week to resume her studies at 
Welis College. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Miss Parks spent Sunday with 
friends in New York City. 

Among those who attended the In- 
dian-Villanova foot ball game at Har- 
rishurg on Sat. Sept. 24, were Pro- 
fessor Wanner, Coach Forrest, Earl 
Carmany, John Lehman, Henry Kreid- 
er, Forrest Hensel and Ralph Riegle. 

Prof. H. H. Shenk will speak in 
the United Brethren Church at Ship- 
pensburg, on Sunday, Oct. 9. 

Prof. S. H. Derickson, '03, the 
efficient head of the department of 
Biology, after returning from Jamaica 
in July, spent six weeks in study at 
Cold Spring Harbor, Long Island. 
Mrs. Derickson accompanied him. 
The material secured bv the Professor 
in Jamaica is of great practical value 
for biological stuay. 

Rev. John C. Rupp, '06, is pastor 
of the United Brethren Church at 
Williamsgrove, Pa. 



Biological Field Club. 

The following program will be ren- 
dered in the Biological Lecture room 
by the Biological Field Club on Ihurs- 
day evening : 

Investigation into the Hypnotism of 
Animals, Lester L. Spessard ; Common 
Insect Enemies of House plants, Cath- 
erine Hershey; Identification of Moss- 
es, W. Albert Brunner ; A Collection 
of Local Insects, William 0. Ellis; 
General Discussion, What I have Ob- 
served in the Field during Vacation. 

This is the first meeting of the year 
and every one is cordially invited to 
attend. 



Y. W. C. A. 

The Y. W. C. A. girls have begun 
work this year with an interest and 
enthusiasm that promises definite re- 
sults. 

Last Sunday, the meeting was con- 
ducted by Miss LaVerne Keister who 
gave an excellent report of the sum- 
mer conference at Granville, Ohio, 
which she attended as a delegate last 
June. Her good and complete ac- 
count of the conference was greatly 
enjoyed by all who heard it. 

Misses Gingrich and Bacbman ren- 
dered special music. 



aCebanon 2/allei/ 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall, are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 
jCawrence Jfeister, tPres. 

You are correct if you get your 

LADIES' and CENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 

The Mutual Life 
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Its contracts are easy to buy, easy to maintain, a sure, 
protection, and a source of profit 

M. P. SPANCLER, Dis. Agt. 
Nutting Buildiug LEBANON PA 

Standard Steam Laundry and 
Scouring Works 

A. F. Ward '90 Proprieter 

27 N. Seventh St. Lebanon Pa. 

Represented at College 

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Printing and Developing for Amateurs 

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Lebanon, Pa. 

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**% ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Send for a Catalogue. TROY, N.Y. 



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Lebanon, Pa. 



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COIiliEGE HEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Annville, Pa., Tuesday, Oetobet* 4, 1910 fio. 2 



Volume II. 



Coming Americans 

Y. M. C A. Assists Foreigners in Prep- 
aration for Citizenship 

An important phase of our Y. M. C. 

A. work is that which is carried on 
among the foreigners at the quarries 
near Annville. This work was begun 
last year under rather adverse cir- 
cumstances, but interest on the part 
of both teachers and pupils was keen, 
and the results were soon obvious. 
The school is held three times each 
week in a building situated aoout two 
miles from Annville, near the quarries 
where the men work. Here Italians, 
Slavs, Polanders and Germans all come 
together to learn English. The teach- 
ers, boys from the local, Y. M. C. A., 
are always greeted by these men with 
"Hello Teac.ier," and a pleaasnt 
smile and handshake. 

As a result of last year's work, 
two Italians procured their first 
naturalization papers. When these 
men started they could speak very 
little English, and read less. Rob- 
ert's "English for Coming Ameri- 
cans," which is specially fitted for 
this work, is used with great success. 

The outlook this year is brighter 
than last, as the attendance is larger 
and interest better'. At present all 
the pupils can read some little Eng- 
lish, a fact which is very encouraging 
to the teacherc. This work should be 
kept up with ren wed courage, sup- 
ported by the who ^.JM. C. A., as 
it is a chance to g e the.K' men, who 
really want to lear , somei ing they 
can get from no otr ^r source. 

Alumni Attended Game 

E. E. Renn, '10, J. Warren Steh" 
man, '09, Max Lehman, '07. and Ora 

B. Harnish. '06, attended the football 
game between Swathmore and Lebanon 
Valley on Saturday, October 1. 



Items of Interest 

Paul Kreider, a former student at 
L. V. C. and a member of 1913 is a 
Freshman at Yale this year. A re- 
cent communication informs us that 
he has won a position on the Fresh- 
man football team and that he is to 
represent his class as a middle weight 
wrestler. 

Misses Grace Smith and Maud Ker- 
shner visited their parents at Shoe- 
makersville over Sunday. 

William Dunlap, has again leturn- 
ed to school and has matriculated for 
work in the Academy. 

Continued on page 2 



Faculty Recital 

Every student and friend of Leba- 
non Valley Conservatory should await 
with interest the first recital of the 
year to be given in Engle Hall on 
Thursday evening, October 6, at 8 
o clock. At this time the new Con- 
servatory Faculty will make its first 
appearance before a Lebanon Valley 
audience. 

Prof. Sheldon, principal of the Con- 
servatory and professor of piano and 
organ, and Miss Brown, professor [of 
voice, are both capable instructors and 
public performers, as is seen from 
their past records at other institutions. 
Mrs. Sheldon, assistant in piano, will 
also appear on this program. 

In addition to the vocal and instru- 
mental numbers, the program will al- 
s o include several readings by Mrs. 
L; ,:, professor of Oratory. Mrs. Eby 
is well known to Lebanon Valley au- 
diences, and her ability can always be 
relied upon. 

Everybody is urged to attend. 



Calendar. 

Tuesday, Oct. 4—6 p. m. ; Students 
Prayer meeting. 

Thursday, Oct. 6—8 p. m., Faculty 
Recital. 6. p. m., Ministerial As- 
sociation. 

Friday, Oct. 7— Societies 7:15. 

Saturday, Oct. 8—3 p. m., Football 
— Dickinson vs. Lebanon Valley at 
Annville. 

Sunday, Oct. 9— Christian Associa- 
tions at 1 p. m. 



Alumni 



E. E. Snyder, '06, former principal 
of Fawn Grove High School, is super- 
intendent of the Stewardstown schools. 

Nancy R. Kauffman, '05. was 
married to Mr. Stacey E. Peters, 
Gettysburg, '08, August 10, 1910. 
Mr. and Mrs. Peters are residing in 
East Downington, where Mr. Peters 
is principal of the High School. 

Born a daughter to Mr. and Mrs. 
Ammon Kreider, of Middletown, Pa. 
Mrs. Kreider was a member of class 
'02, Conservatory. 

Mr. Ray Engle, a graduate of the 
College spent Friday in town among 
friends. 

Mr. Ivan H. McKendrick, a grad- 
uate of the conservatory, '06, and a 
former football star, spent Thursday 
and part of Friday at the College. 
Mr. McKendrick is now practising law 
at Ebensburg, Pa. 

Miss Sallie Kreider, '08, was a 
guest of the Clionian Literary Society 
on Friday evening. 

Miss Lucy Seltzer, '10, renewed 
acquaintance at the college on Friday 
of last week. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fields 



Issued weekly during the College 
Year by Lebanon Valley College 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

P. R. KOONTZ, '11 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. A. BRUNNER, '11 
E. A. SPESSARD, '11 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

W. O. ELLIS, '11 
P. E. KENNEDY, '12 
■CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, '12 
HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
S. O. GRIMM, '12 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
and PUBLISHER 

ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 

OLIVER BUTTER WICK '12 
PAUL LOSER, '13 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 

Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 
to J. Walter Esbenshade, Nutting 
Building, Lebanon ; all other matter 
to College News, Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

The Athletic Situation at L. V. C. 

That Athletics are of vital import- 
ance to any institution cannot be gain- 
said. They relate to its material ad- 
vancement both as an advertising me- 
dium and promoter of health among 
students, not to mention the worry 
saved the faculty by giving the boys 
an outlet for those energies which 
otherwise would take a different and 
■sometimes very undesirable course. 

During the past several years ath- 
letics at Lebanon Valley have lain un- 
der a cloud, caused by elements both 
within and without the institution. 
Because of this ibe managers have ex- 
perienced the greatest difficulties in 
arranging and maintaining successful 
schedules, in fact they have been act- 
ually forced to abandon them when 
•only partly completed. That such 
conditions existed is a shame, the stig- 
ma of which can be removed only by 
the most progressive policies 

About a year ago Athletics at Lebanon 
Valley took on new life. Thanks to 
the progressive policies and unswerv- 
ing energies of last year's managers 
both of football and baseball, very 



successful schedules were completed. 
The football season was in many re- 
spects the best in our history. Ihe 
general state of lethargy concerning 
athletics began to disappear. 'Ihe 
clouds of opposition which had been so 
blighting began to rise, and from the 
mists which had enveloped our institu- 
tion, a new spirit came forth. 

Very few of last year's football 
stars returned this season and gloom 
was again settling around us. but the 
combined energies of our manager and 
captain were equal to the occasion. 
An efficient coach was secured and the 
boys began to work hi earnest. Dur- 
ing the past week the scrub team has 
more than doubled its strength both 
in weight and numbers. Prof. Wan- 
ner has assumed control of this squad 
and owing to his genial nature and 
knowledge of the game, their spirit 
and effectiveness has reached a plane 
never before attained by any second 
team at Lebanon Valley College. 

Thi3 spirit has awakened an interest 
not only among the members of the 
teams but the student body in general, 
and the scenes on the Athletic field 
during afternoon practice vie in in- 
terest with many regular games that 
have formerly been played there. 
This spirit does not stop with the stu- 
dent body, but is reaching the faculty, 
who by their t resence on the field and 
kindly councils, have rendered much 
valuable service. The executive com- 
mittee of the Association is about to 
offer a new constitution, which will 
provide for tennis, track and field 
sports. The track proposition has 
been received with much ardor and 
present conditions seem to indicate 
that Lebanon Valley will be able tJ 
put forth men in this department 
qualified to bring her the greatest 
honor. What do these conditions in- 
dicate ? Is it not a prophecy that the 
near future will witness the realiza- 
tion of a dream, which has proven 
illusive so long, and that Lebanon 
Valley will be relieved of the one en- 
cumbrance which has kept her from 
assuming the foremost place among 
the so-called small colleges of Penn- 
sylvania? This is no idle vision. A 
gymnasium will soon be a reality. 
There is, however, much to be done. 
The race has onlv begun. The final 
outcome rests with each individual 



member of the student body and alum- 
ni association. 

When a long felt need becomes a 
positive demand, that need will be 
satisfied. We all know that our col- 
lege and Alma Mater needs the gym- 
nasium,— let us make it a demand. 
This we can do by freely lending as- 
sistance to our teams. As students 
we should deem it a sacred obligation 
to ourselves and our school that we 
pay our athletic fee, and if possible 
identify ourselves with some phase of 
athletics. This in return will 
strengthen both our body and mind. 
If we cannot make the varsity, we 
need not worry, we receive more than 
wo give. 

In this way we help to develop a 
varsity that can win us victories, and 
whether we win or not is a matter of 
economic importance to each of us. 
The value of our diplomas will in- 
crease in the same proportion as the 
fame of our college. Let us deter- 
mine to present a winning team. The 
alumni can help by contributions and 
when possible attendance at gamep. 
You may become a member of our as- 
sociation and give us renewed enthusi- 
asm by your cheers. 

Let us all, by freely giving our fees 
and services promote clean healthy 
athletics at Lebanon Valley. Thus 
we will become an honor to ourselves 
and our college. 



ITEMS OF INTEREST 

Coutinued From First Page 

Misses Ely and Weidman were 
visitors at Palmyra on Sunday. 

Charles G. White, a new student 
and a member of 1912, accompanied 
his father, Mr. George White, to 
Gettysburg on Tuesday, September 27. 

Rev. Mark G. Holtzman, a stu- 
dent at school and serving West Leb- 
anon pastorate, deserves credit for the 
admirable re~ ort of his church thi3 
year. 

Ralph R. Riegle, accompanied the 
football team to Swathmore, and on 
his return spent Saturday evening and 
Sunday visiting several of his old ac- 
quaintances in Reading. 

I. K. Potter, '13, was in Lebanon 
on Saturday evening making social 
calls. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PR.OCRAMS 

KALOZETEAN 

Chorus, Society; Paoer, D. C. 
Keister; Reading, J. W. Ischey ; Bari- 
tone Solo, Harry Bender : Debate : Re- 
solved, That the Increased cost of Liv- 
ing is not due to Monoplies; Affirma- 
tive, C. Y. Ulrch, P. E. Holdcraft; 
Negative, G. A. Williams, W. 0. 
Ellis; Piano Solo, Paul Strickler; 
Examiner, Editor. 

Visitors invited. 

CLIO PROGRAM 
Piano solo, Grace Smith; Current 
Events, Blanche Risser;The Tariff: 
"A moral Issue," Edith Lehman; 
Piano duet, Mae Meyer, Ruth Det- 
weiler; Original Story, Edna Yarkera ; 
The Moving Picture and its Influence 
on the National Character, Clara Horn ; 
Reading, Kathryn Clauser; Olive 
Branch, Editor. 

PHILO PROGRAM 
Current Events, Ivan Potter; Or- 
iginal Story, Sedic Rine; Debate: Re- 
soved That Berry was Justified in Split- 
ting from the Democratic party and Ac- 
cepting the Leadership of the Keystone 
Party; Affirmative. J. W. Bomberger, 
W. A. Brunner; Negative, E. K. 
Boughter, S. G. Ziegler; Paper, The 
Pleasures of a Freshman, George Zull- 
inger; Living Thoughts, Editor. 



Christian Associations 

There was an interesting joint meet- 
ing of the two aseociations on Sunday 
afternoon. The leader was F. R. 
Kennedy. Tho following program 
was given : 

Vocal Solo, Miss Florence Roland; 
The Plan of our Year's Work, Miss 
Helen Weidler; Ladies' Quartette, 
Misses Gingrich, Brightbill, Zmmer- 
man, SpessarJ; Mission Study, F. R, 
Kennedy. An interesting discussion 
followed in which Messrs. Brunner, Er- 
hart, Koontz, tnd Ischy made appro- 
priate remarks. 

Miss Weidler presented the work 
of the Y. W. C. A. in a clear and 
pleasing manner. The ladies intend 
to carry on Mission and Bible Study 
classes throughout the year. Their 
plan is to pray and work for greater 
things. Hearty co-operation is neces- 
sary in order to make a success of this 



phase of college life. The vocal se- 
lections were well rendered. 

The leader of mission study gave 
three reasons for mission study and 
in conclusion outlined the plan of the 
missionary committee for the ensuing 
year. There will oe four classes, one 
for the study of Home Missions, led 
by W. A. Brunner, the study of 
Foreign Missions led by E. A. Spess- 
ard, who will use J. R. Mott's work 
"The Decisive Hour of Christian 
Missions." F. R. Kennedy will lead 
a class in "Missions of China." The 
references of this course will be: 
History of the Chinese by F. L. 
Hawks Pott. Religion of the Chinese, 
China's only Hope, by Chang Chi Tung ; 
New Forces in Old China and Awake- 
ning of China, by W. Martin. The 
fourth class will make a study of com- 
parative Religions and will be led by a 
professor. 

In order to make a success of these 
courses and to see the plans perfected, 
every man in school is needed to help 
the movement. Get in line and do 
your part. Join some class. 



New Class Officers. 

The following officers have been 
elected to serve the classes for the 
first Semester : 

SENIORS 
President, F L. Frost; Vice Presi- 
dent, J. K, Lehman ; Secretary, R. B. 
Saylor ; Treasurer, W. C. Shoop. 

JUNIORS 
President, C F. Hamish; Vice 
President, Miss Carrie Light; Secre- 
tary, J. C. Shively; Treasurer, S. 
B. Plummer. 

SOPHOMORES 
President, G. A. Richie; Vice 
Presid nt, Earle Loser; Secretary, 
Miss Sara Zimmerman ; Treasurer, 
Miss Edith Lehman. 



New Course to be Offered 

President Keister will give a course 
in Bowne's Metaphysics and also one 
in the Gospel of John. The hour of 
meeting will be Saturday at 9 a. m. 
The first work will be on the 22nd of 
October. These courses are designed 
to lead to the A.M. degree but seniors 
and juniors will be permitted to at- 
tend. 



New Fall Styles 
Clothing, Shoes, 
Hats, Men's 
Furnishings 




THE H!GH ARCH 

KING "QUALITY 



The King Quality "Hi- Arch " shoe 
is a strikingly original and stylish model. 
The two inch heel, short forepart, 
and the gra^-*"' " Hi- Arch " give this 
model a smartness that appeals strongly 
to the younger set. 

Ask your dealer to show you " The 
Harvard" and "The Yale," two 
KING QUALITY MODELS on 
the " Hi-Arch " last. You will pro- 
nounce these shoes the smartest ever 

The KING QUALITY SHCE in 
all styles is literally bu:lt like a watch, 
so cleverly and precisely are the parts 
put together. The best of materials 
throughout. Even the thread used is 
of superior quality — real Irish flax tcr 
the soles and the strongest of silk for 
all outside sewing. 

Do you wonder that the KING 
QUALITY SHOE is worn by 
fashionable dressers? 

NEW FALL SHAPES 

AND 

STYLES NOW READY 

Button and Lace 

$3 00 to $5.00 



M. A. KLINEFELTER 

PALMYRA, PA. 



I 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Football 

The footbali game on Saturday 
against Swathmore was one of which 
we cannot exactly be proud. Nor can 
we at the same time exactly censure 
the team who did such good work 
against the Indians. 

The squad left Annville, not with 
a certainty of winning the game, but 
certainly with a secret feeling of 
moderate success. Every man hoped 
to bring back some laurels for L. V. 
but such unfortunately was not the 
case. Songs and cheers were lacking, 
for several reasons, and after loafing 
about Swathmore campus for several 
hours, the team spiritedly went in a 
body to the field. 

The first down evidently killed the 
game. Swathmore, although she 
gained nothing in yards, made a heavy 
rush against our fellows causing un- 
doubtedly a little surprise. The L. 
V. men not expecting Swathmore to 
"rcugh it up" so much, seemed to 
loose confidence, and as a result 47-0 
was the final score. We certainly 
should not criticise the boys but by 
better support encourage them. This 
will make our next game a victory. 



Class of 1910 

The following is a list of the pres- 
ent occupations of the members of the 
class of 1910. 

Harry K. Bomberger is principal of 
the high school of Ligonier, Pa. 

J. Clyde Strock is an instriict->r in 
English and History in St. Charles 
Military Academy, St. Charles, Mis- 
souri. Walter Kohr '04, is President 
'of this institution. 

W. E. Harnish is teaching: in fhe 
High School in Cass City, Mich. 

Mary r$. Musser has charge of 
Latin, French and Music in the high 
school of Clayton, N. J. 

Myrtle Garret is teaching in the 
public schools at Waltonville. 

Edith N. Freed accepted a position 
in the Hawley High School. Hawley, 
Pa. 

Earl E. Renn has entered the law 
department of University of Penn- 
sylvania. 

F. Allen Rutherford and Floyd E. 
Shaeffer will enter the medical school 
of Johns Hopkins University. 

L. May Hoerner is an instructor in 



the Science department of Norris- 
town High Schorl. 

F. T. Kohler and M. R. Fleming 
are attending BoneLrake Theological 
Seminary, Dayton, Ohio. 

G. C. Bairis the assistant secretary 
of the Brooklyn Naval Y. M. C. A. 

Jessie T. Yoder, the first editor of 
the "College News," is a teacher in 
the high school at Southampton, Long 
Island. 

Fred S. Smith, the only 1910 Con- 
servatory graduate, is director of the 
Sugar Grove Conservatory, Sugar 
Grove, Pa. 

Wilbur C. Plummer is teaching in 
the high school at Beardstown, 111. 

Lucy S. Seltzer is at her home in 
Lebanon. 

Charles Plummer is living with 
his brother, F. Berry Plummer, '05, 
at Shippensburg. 

Victor O. Weidler is teaching in 
Waynesboro High School, Waynes- 
boro, Pa. 

aCebanon Ualley 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 

ffiev. cCawrence Jfeister, !Pres. 
jfnnvilte, !Pa. 

Kodaks, Cameras 
and Supplies 

Printing and Developing for Amateurs 

HARPEL'S ART STORE 

Lebanon, Pa. 



H. ft. SpaifiHi ft Bns. 



The 



Spalding 

TRADE MARK 




Is known throughout 
the world as a 

Guarantee of 
Quality 



Are the largest 
manufacturers in 
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Official 
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For All 
Athletic 
Sports and 
Pastimes 

are in 
teres t - 
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Athletic Sport you 
should have acopy 
of the Spalding 
Catalogue. It's a. 
complete encyclo- 
pedia o f What's 
New in Sport and. 
is sent free or. 
request. 



IFYOD 



A. G Spalding & Bro. 

1120 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

You are correct if you get your 

LADIES' and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffc Shoes 

Standard Steam Laundry and 
Scouring Works 

A. F. Ward '90 Proprieter 

27 N. Seventh St. Lebanon Pa. 

Represented at College 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

SCHOOL of V\ 
ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Send for a Catalogue. TROY, N.Y. 

£~T~ Full line of College Post Cards, 
Bl Writing Papers, Envelopes, Tablets. 

Pens, Pencils, Ink, Pictures, Pen* 
nants, Box Paper, Photopaste. Also Eyes 
Examined and Glasses Fitted. 

D. B. SHIFFER 
WEST MAIN STREET ANNVILLE, PA. 





COIiliEGE HEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Annville, Pa., Tuesday, Oetobei* 11, 1910 fio. 3 



Volume II. 



Lebanon Valley Holds 
Dickinson to 13-0 

L. V, Boys Played Fast Came and 
Made Visitors Sit Up and 
Take Notice 

In the first game at Annville Dick- 
inson was given an unexpected jar by 
the boys in white and blue. The game 
was an interesting one and was wit- 
nessed by a large crowd of students 
and visitors. While this was not an 
entire victory for L. V. the results of 
the game were exceedingly encouraging 
and new enthus'asm has been added to 
the game. The good fight put up by 
the home team is but reflection of 
what interest and encouragement on 
the part of the student body will do 
for athletics at L. V. C. 

The game was called at 3 :00 o'clock. 
During the first quarter Dickirson 
scored a touchdown and a field goal. 
In the second and third quarters the 
pigskin was kept near the middle of 
the field. The first half ended with 
the ball on Dickinson territory with L. 
V. carrying it rapidly towards their 
opponent's goal. During the labt 
quarter Dickinson again scored a 
touchdown after several L. V. men 
had been knocked out by rough play- 
ing. |l-.|V. was outweighed twenty-five 
pounds to the man. Dickinson 
made gains by old-time plunging 
while L. V. played all around 
their opponents in speed and in 
putting the ndw rules into practice. 
Captatin Lehman, Hayes, S. Hertzler 
and Hensel played star games for L. V. 
while Dunn made greatest gains for 
Dickinson. The lineup: 
L.V. Positions Dickinson 

Tallman Left end Miller 
(H.Kreider) (Stafford) 
Charlton Left tackle - Felton (Capt.) 

(Harnish) 

Kennedy Left guard Bashore (Gish) 
Marsha'l Center J. Hetzler 



Spessard Right guard McGregor 
Hensel Right tackle Steele 

Hayes Right end Cook (Naugle) 

Frost Quarter back Vickwise 
S. Hertzler Left half back Garten 
Loser Right half back Merve (Wise) 
Lehman (.Capt.) Full back Dunn 
Touchdowns— Dunn 2. Field goal — 
Wise. Referee— -Barnhart. Umpire 
— Wilder. Field judge— Meredith. 
Head linesman— Kettering. Time — 
10 minute quarters. 

Woman's Board Meets 



Held First Session for the Year on 
Wednesday 

The L. V. C. Woman's Board held 
its first meeting for the year on 
Wednesday afternoon at the home of 
Mrs. Lawrence Keister on Sheridan 
Avenue with a good attendance of 
members. 

Routine matters occupied a part of 
the time. The work of the past 
summer was reviewed pnd plans out- 
lined for the work of the coming year. 
The treasury show3 a balance of $60.00 
left from the amount raised for grad- 
ing the campus. 

Besides grading the campus, during 
the year the board planted a number 
of catalpa trees along Sheridan 
Avenue, and planted a screen of hem- 
locks and honey suckles on the north 
side of the Ladies' Hall. Fifty one 
vines were also planted to cover the 
various buildings on the campus. The 
board also assisted in placing the con- 
crete porches at the music hall. 

A chicken and waffle supper is be- 
ing planned for November 12th to be 
held in the former Ladies' Hall on 
Main Street, to raise money for addi- 
tional improvements to grounds and 
buildings. 

The next meeting of the board will 
beheld on November 2nd at the home 
of Mrs. J. S. Mills on East Main 
Street at which time new officers will 
be elected. 

The board now has 200 inembres. 



Calendar. 

Tuesday, Oct. 11—6 p. m., Stu- 
dent's Prayer Meeting. 

Wednesday, Oct. 12—7 p. m. Bio- 
logical Field Club m Biology Recita- 
tion Room. 

Friday, Oct. 14-7:15 p. m., So- 
cieties. 

Sunday, Oct.l 6-1 p. m., Y. M. C. 
A. ; 1:30 p. m. Y,. W. C. A. 




Alumni 

Ray Light, '06, is teaching Latin 
in the Lebanon High School, as suc- 
cessor to Roy J. Guyer, '08. 

R. S. B. Hartz, '08, is at present 
attending Cornell University. 

Rev. J. T. Spangler, D.D., '90, for 
twelve years professor of Greek in 
Lebanon Valley College, attended the 
East Pennsylvania Conference at Sun- 
bury, Pa., last week, an j received the 
appointment of pastor of the Mt. Joy 
U. B. Church. 

M. R. Fleming, '10, a student of 
Bonebrake Theological Seminary, 
stopped at the College on Monday, 
en route to the Pennsylvania Confer, 
ence at Dallastown this week. 

Mi=s Grace Lowery, '09, and Miss 
Saliie Kreider, '08, were College 
visitors on Saturday and attended 
the Dickinson game. 

Dr. Ralph Engle, '05, of Palmyra 
called on friends at the College on 
Wednesday. 

Rev. E. O. Burtner, '90, was trans- 
ferred from Lykens to Palmyra at the 
conference at Sunbury. 

Rev. F. Berry Plummer, '05, will 
deliver tne Convention sermon before 
the state Christian Endeavor Conven- 
tion at Cumberland, Maryland, Oct. 25. 
(Continued On page 4) 



I 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College J4ecus 



Issued weekly during the College 
Year by Lebanon Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

P. R. KOONTZ, '11 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. A. BRUNNER, '11 

E. A. SPESSARD, '11 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

W. O. ELLIS, '11 

F. R. KENNEDY, '12 
CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, '12 

HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
S. O. GRIMM, '12 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
W. A. Brunner, '11, 
ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 
OLIVER BUTTERWICK '12 
PAUL LOSER, '13 

Subscription Price S1.00 per year 
Single Copies j cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 els. 

Address all business communications 
to W. A. Brunner, Box 99, all other 
matter to College News, Annville, 
Pa. 



Editorial 

In addressing the students on the 
subject of Athletics at the Fall term 
reception, Dean Shenk made very time- 
ly remarks regarding a gymnasium 
for Lebanon Valley College. He call- 
ed attention to the fact that as long 
as the coliege was burdened with debt, 
and was without immediate prospect 
of endowment, it would have been 
folly for the authorities to have direct- 
ed their efforts toward securing funds 
for the erection of a new building, 
which, however desirable in itself, 
would have added to the current ex- 
pense and made (he path of the finan- 
cial management even more difficu't 
than it was. But now with the debt 
canvass in good shape, and with a 
good ^asis of endowment, in the Eber- 
ly-Bittinger bequests, the Dean held 
that the time is ripe to push the gym- 
nasium project. 

The necessity of a gymnisium for 
Lebanon Valley College can not be 
questioned. Many students do not 
care for the violent exercise o f foot- 
ball or baseball, and some are forbid- 
den by their parents to indulge in them 
or other sports. Yet they are en- 
titled to enjoy the benefit of physical 



training, and have just cause for 
complaint if the opportnity is not 
given them. 

jn the second place, during half the 
collegiate year the weather condithms 
are such as to exclude regular outdoor 
exercise. It is during these winter 
months that every college student 
should be required to take regular and 
systematic exercise in a gymnasium. 
It is during these months that the 
most remunerative of all college sports 
—basket ball is played, and we have 
been very much hampered in maintain- 
ing athletic relations with certain in- 
stitutions because of inability to meet 
their teams in basket ball. 

Again, the problem of discipline for 
dormitory students would be largely 
solved by the gymnasium. The physi- 
cal activities of youth can be directed 
in no more legitimate channel than 
that of exercise in well regulated 
gymnastics ; close these channels, and 
this activity will seek less desirable 
avenues — that may lead to the neces- 
sity fcr discipline by the Faculty. 
One of the best methods by which to 
train body ?nd mind alike is to organ- 
ize play and give energy, the surplus 
energy of youth proper direction. 



Biological Field Club. 

The following program will be 
rendered by the Biological Field Club 
on Wednesday evening, October 12tl. 
at 7:00 o'clock. 

Bermuda Sponges, E. A. Spessard ; 
The insect Enemy of the Potato, Chas. 
Arndt ; Trop'cal Flowers and Fruits, 
F. R. Kennedy; Anatomy the of Bat, 
Jesse Reed; Poisonous Po'ato in this 
Vicinity, Ivan Ressler; General Dis- 
cussion, Vivisection. All the mem- 
bers of the club are urged to be pres- 
ent as important business must be 
transacted. Everybody welcome. 



Attention ! 

Please note that the business man- 
agement of the "News" has changed 
with this issue. All business in connec- 
tion with the publication should be 
adilressed to the new manager. .The 
manager requests that every old sub- 
scriber consider him&elf a committee 
of one to help boost the circulation of 
the "News" and call attention of 
advertisers to our columns. 



Faculty Recital 

Large Audience Hears Fine Program 

Thursdav evening afforded the 
music lovers of the College and town 
a great treat. A large audience 
greeted Prof. Sheldon and the other 
members of the Conservatory Faculty. 

Both vocai and instrumental num- 
bers were veiy we 1 ! rendered and 
showed marked ability. Mr. Fred 
Light, '00, instructor of violin, proved 
himself very capable of the position. 
Mrs. Eby pleased the audience with 
one of her fine readings which are 
always received with applause from 
L. V. C. audiences. Quite a large 
number of students are enrolled in the 
Music and Oratory departments, and 
everything portends a veiy successful 
year. The program follows : 

Verdi, "Tu la sorte dell' armi" 
(Aida), Vocal Duec, Mrs. Sheldon and 
Miss Brown; Svendsen, Romance, 
Violin, Mr. Light; Hiller, Concerto 
in F sharp minor, Two Pianos, And 
ante. Finale-Allegro con fuoco, Mr. 
Sheldon, 1st piano, Mrs. Sheldon, 2nd 
piano; a Grieg, "Ich li,he dich, " 
Songs, b Stern, Soupir, c Mallinson, 
"Sing! Break into Song", d A. L. 
"Come. Sweet Morning," Mis- 
Brown; Kate D. Wiggin, A cutting 
from "Timothy's Quest", Reading, 
Mis. Eby; Cowen. "Hast Thou VVan- 
dere w ? "(Rose Maiden) Vocal Trio, 
Mrs. Shledon, Miss Brown, Mr. 
Sheldon. 



Y. W. C. A. 

The Y. W. C A. had a very pleas- 
ant and profitable meeting on Sunday 
afternoon. Miss Carrie Light, '12, 
brought us Echoes from the Summer 
Conference which was held at Denni- 
son University during the month of 
July. 

The report was very interesting and 
portrayed the social and religious life 
of hundreds of college girls who are 
gathered for the same purpose, the 
promulgating of the Christian Religion 
and the strengthening of the human 
soul. 

Miss Verda Snyder sang "That 
Sweet Story of Old," in a pleasing 
manner. The attendance was good 
and the meeting as a whole was very 
encouraging. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 

PHILO PROGRAM 
Who's who at L. V. C.~ Paul Hum- 
mel; The King of America, P. F. 
Roberts ; Debate : Resolved, That the 
Initiative and Referendum Would Eli- 
minate Most of the Political Corrup- 
tion of our Country; Affirmative' 
Landis Klinger, E. A. Spessard ; 
Negative, C. F. Harnish, S. 0. 
Grimm; Should ! Samuel Plummer. 
CLIO PROGRAM 
Instrumental Solo, "Narcissus," 
Lottie Spessard; Current Events in 
the Musical World, Florence Roland ; 
Story of the Minuet, Vera Myers; 
Vocal Solo, " lhe Last Rose of Sum- 
mer, ' ' Edith Gingrich ; Does Music Aid 
the Business Woman? Grace Smith; 
Vocal Solo, "0 Promise Me," Eva 
Foltz; Interesting Facts About Great 
Composers, Ora Bachman ; Story of 
Beethoven's Moonlight Sonota, Bertha 
Spessard; Instrumental Solo, "Bee- 
thoven's Moonlight Sonata, Mae E. 
Meyer. 

KALOZETEAN 
Happenings of week, Chas. A. 
Amdt; My Ideas of Hypnotism, F- 
R. Kennedy; Chorus, Society ; Oration, 
H. E. Snavely ; Pennsylvania Dutch 
Dialog, W. D. Beiver and .Victor 
Heffelfinger ; Essay, Karl Schmidt; 
L. V. versus Albright, a comparison, 
Charles White; Chorus, Society; Visi- 
tors welcome. 



Oratory Notes 

The work in the Oratory depart- 
ment is advancing rapidly under the 
direction of Mrs Eby. The class of 
1911 is composed of Misses Edith Mc- 
Curdy, Kathryn Clr.user, Verda Snyder 
and Mr. J. VV. Ischy. At the concert on 
Thursday evening, they were dis- 
tinguished from the Music Seniors by 
the brown tassels on their caps as 
contrasted to the pink of the latter 
It was the first appearance of both 
Orrtory and Music Seniors in caps and 
go .vns 

Each member of the Class of 1911 
in Oratory is preparing a plav or 
standard novel which will take about 
an hour and a half in rendition, to be 
given at various times during the year. 

Miss Helen Brighlbill, '12, Oratory, 
spent the past few days in Philadel- 
phia. 



Miss Grace Smith, '12, Oratory, 
will spend Saturday in Reading. 

The class in gymnastics has been 
started for the year. The time of 
meeting is Monday and Thursday at 4 
o'clock. It is important that all the 
young ladies take advantage of the 
course in free and light gymnastics. 




Breezy Point 



CHos to Give Comedy in Three Acts 
in Engle Conservatory. 

The Clionian Literary So iety will 
present the plav, "Breezy Point," a 
comedy in Three Acts, on Thursday 
evening, October 20, at 7 -A5 o'clock. 
Mrs. Eby is directing the rehearsals, 
which are proving very satisfactory. 

The girls are working hard to make 
this event a success, and deserve the 
support of students and friends of 
the College. 

The Admission will be 25c, reserved 
seats 10c extra. Don't forget the 
date, Oct. 20, 1910. Come and bring 
your friends. 



Y. M. C. A. 

On Sunday afternoon the devotional 
committee had charge of the meeting. 
Mr. Earl Spessard was the leader. 

He showed how necessary it was 
that everyone should do any work 
assigned to them with cheerfulness. 
He gave a short description of the 
work among the foreigners and ex- 
plained the different phases of the 
work. 

Messrs. Koontz, Lester Spessard and 
Brunner made appropriate remarks 
on the same subject. The mee'ings 
on Sunday afternoon should not be 
neglected. All are requested to come. 
Come and bring another fellow. 



President Keister Receives a 
Signal Honor 

President Keister has been narred 
by the chairman of the Rhodes Founda- 
tion Scholarship Fund committee of 
Pennsylvania as a member of that 
committee for 1911. It is the duty cf 
this committee consisting of five 
members to select from those candi- 
dates, whose examinations have been 
approved in England, the recipient of 
the Rhodes Scholarship for our State. 



James C Shively, '12, was in Leb- 
anon Saturday afternoon on business. 



Items of Interest 



Miss Florence Roland was called to 
her home in Reading last week owing 
to the illenss of her mother. 

L. A. Rodes, '14, spent Sunday at 
the home of his parents in Wormleys- 
burg. 

Harry Denlinger spent the week end 
at his heme at Intercourse. 

M. G. Holtzman addressed the Sun- 
bury Y. W. C. A. on Sunday afternoon. 
Mr. Holtzman was again appointed 
pastor of the West Lebanon U. B. 
Church. 

Miss Brown spent Sunday in New 
York City. 

Miss Dodge and Prof, and Mrs. 
Sheldon were Harrisburg vistors on 
Saturday. 

A. S. Beckley, '12. was transferred 
frcm Montclare to Grantville. 

C. B. Rettew, one cf the best 
known P. R. R. conductors, a prom- 
inent member of First U. B. Church, 
Harrisburg, and a warm friend of the 
College, died on Sunday morning. 
Funerai will be held on Wednesday at 
2 o'clock. 

Ralph Shearer, '14, spent Sunday 
at his home in Harrisburg. 

Miss Anna M. Kellar, a former stu- 
dent, is at present located at Stone 
Harbor, where she is employed as a 
teacher. 

Misses Mary Gallagher, of Shamo- 
kin, Err.estina Kunst, of Lebanon, and 
Delia B. Rice, of Annville, matricu- 
lated for work at the College on 
Monday. 

President Keister conducted the 
"College hour" at the East Penn- 
sylvania Conference at Sunbury on 
Friday evening. At this time a 
number of alumni ministers gave 
spirited addresses. 

Messrs. Shoop, '12, Holdeman, '11, 
Becklev, '12, White, '12. and Holtz- 
man attended the sessions of the East 
Pennsylvania Conference at Sunbury 
last week 

Prof. A. Wanner, superintendent 
r>l the schools of the city of York 
was the guest of his son, Prof. H. 
E. Wanner, over Saturday and Sunday. 



i 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Miss Naomi Ely left for Hagers- 
town, Md., on Friday where she will 
spend a week at her home. 

Miss Nellie Seltzer, '12, spent 
Saturday evening at Mount Gretna as 
a guest at a house party. 

Mr. Clinton Barr, a student here 
nearly twenty years ago winessed the 
football game on Saturday. Mr. Barr 
now resides in Lebanon. 

Mr. James Shively, '12, returned 
to school last week from his home at 
Chambersbutg. 

Mr. Ira L. Hershey, of Hershey, 
was a spectator at the Dickinson-Leb- 
anon Valley football game on Satur- 
day. 

Prof. S. H. Derickson, continues 
to improve and everyone at school 
trusts he shall soon return to the Bio- 
logical Department. 

Messrs. Keister, '12, and Rettew, 
'12, spent Saturday evening in Harris- 
burg. 

Quite a number of people from Leb- 
anon and vicinity were at the recital 
on Thursday evening. They express- 
ed themselves as being favorably im- 
pressed with the shewing of the de- 
partment of Mu<-ic, and Oratory. 

Messrs. Paul Strickler, '14, and 
Arthur Light, '14, witnessed the Steel- 
ton High and Lebanon High School 
football game at Lebanon on Saturday 
afternoon. 

Mr. Charles White, '12, was ap- 
pointed pastor of the Rockville charge 
in East Pennsylvania Conference for 
the ensuing year. 

Rev. Spayd is again the college 
pastor for the ensuing year. 

Ervin E. Eby a graduate of the 
Academy in the clats of 1910 and a 
freshman in the Electrical Engineering 
Department of State College received 
a visit from his parents last Monday 
and reported the work going well. 
He is following the freshman rules 
of that place ver\ closely as he refus- 
ed to accompany his mother from the 
hotel. 

ALUMNI NOTES 

Continued from page 1 
Rev. J. Warren Kaufman, '06, was 
transferred from Mt. Pisgah, Phila- 
delphia, to St. John's. 

Rev. D. S. Eshleman, '09, has re- 
signed from the conference and the 
church. 



Miss Ethel May Fenner was married 
on Oct. 1, to Max 0. Snyder, '06. 
They are at home in Peekskill, N. Y. 

Rev. A. R. Clippinger, '05, has 
been appointed pastor of the Summitt 
Street United Brethren Church, Day- 
ton, Ohio, and has assumed the duties 
of his new pastorate. 

Rev. A. A. Long, D.D., '89, has 
been appointed pastor of the First 
United Brethren Church, Altoona. 

Rev. A. K. Weir, '00, of Shamokin, 
was a visitor at the College on Mon- 
day. 

Miss Mary E. Peiffer, '07, is in- 
structor in Algebra in the Pottstown 
High School. 

aCebanon valley 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
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Write for catalogue 
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COIiliEGE flEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume II. 



Annville, Pa., Tuesday, Oetobei* 18, 1910 



Ho. 4 



Foot-Ball 

L. V. vs. Muhlenburg and Why She 
Lost. 

The boys left Annville on Saturday 
morning on the Flyer for Muhlenburg 
College with high hopes of bringing 
back a victory, but were dissapointed. 

The score was a surprise to all the 
students, both on and off the team, 
and when particulars were weighed it 
was evident that Muhlenburg out- 
classed us, but only because our team 
has not been supported by the student 
body. The team showed remarkable 
courage and pluck and fought like 
"grim death." The spirit with 
which they have been playing shows 
that they have the possibilities of a 
first class team. But these possi- 
bilities can never be developed without 
men to scrimmage them. At Muh- 
lenburg the same old trouble was man- 
fested : a lack of defensive practice. 

Tne game was called promptly at 3 :00 
p. m. Muhlenburg hicked off. Hertzler 
received the ball and carried it to 
their 50-yard line for first down. After 
repeated attempts to gain we were 
forced to punt, through which Muhlen- 
burg made their first touch-down. 

The first quarter ended 12—0. 
Mulenburg again kicked off and For- 
rest carried the ball to their 45-yard 
line ; but we were again forced to punt, 
after which Muhlenburg tried an out- 
side kick. Forest received it and 
rushed it to our 25-yard line. After 
repeated gains on our forward passes, 
Widmeyer took the ball across for our 
first touch-down, The same quarter 
we had the ball within Iwo feet of the 
goal but were held for downs. Second 
Quarter ended 24-6 for Muhlenburg. 

In the third and fourth quarters our 
boys became discouraged on account of 
the unfairness of the officials. The 
game ended with a score 40-6 for Muh- 
lenburg, and be it said, to the shame of 
the disloyal, disinterested and cowardly 



student body whose duty it is to sup- 
port its foot-ball heroes who are sacri- 
ficing more than is at first glance ap- 
parent, all for the^ institution they 
love so dearly. 

The line-up in Saturday's game 
was as follows : 

Right end, Kreider, Hertzler; light 
tackle, Hensel ; right Guard, Beaver, 
Smith ; Center, Marshall; left guard, 
Kennedy; left tackle, Charlton; left 
end, Hayes, Frost; quarterback, For- 
rest; right halfback, W.'dmeycr, 
Hertzler; left halfback, Loser; full 
back, Lehman, Capt. 

The boys r laved a splendid game 
and although defeated again, they ex- 
pect to hold Gettysburg to a very close 
score after which game the hardest 
part of our schedule will be over. 

Let every man physically able to 
"bear arms" present himself for dutv 
every night the team reports for prac- 
tice. 



Y. W. C. A. 

The meeting was led by Miss Edna 
Yarkers, who spoke on the subject: 
"Women of the Bible." The leader 
took for the basis of her remarks four 
of the most prominent women char- 
acters to be found inBible history- 
Eve, Rebecca, Ruth, and Mary the 
mother of Christ. She outlined brief- 
ly the life and distinguishing charac- 
teristics of each, whether weakness or 
stength and applied each to the pesent 
day. 

The meeting was vey interesting 
throughout. A spirit of devotion was 
mainfestly present and there was no 
reserve on the part of the girls. 
Various other characters were discuss- 
ed and opirions given. 

Although the number at this meet- 
ing was smaller than at any other 
previous meeting held this year, the 
interest shown was greater, and it is 
to be hoped that we may be able to 
keep up that interest and increase the 
attention at the same time. 



Calendar. 

Tuasday Oct., 18,-6 p. m. Stu- 
dents Prayer Meeting. 

Thursday Oct, 20—8 p. m. Breezy 
Point ; afternoon, football, L. V. vs. 
Gettysburg at Gettysburg. 

Friday, Oct. 21— 7:15 p. m. Soci- 
ties. 

Sunday, Oct. 23-1 p. m., Y. M. C. 
A; 1:30 p. m. , Y. W. C. A. 




Rev. A. K. Wier. '00, of Sha- 
mokin visited friends at the college 
last week. 

Mr. A. K. Mills, '05, attended the 
funeral of Mr. C. R. Rettew on Mon- 
day. 

Miss Ruth E. Hershey is taking 
work for her A. M. degree in Colum- 
bia University. 

Rev. S. B. Long, '08, a senior in 
Union Theological Seminary, New 
York City, was ordained by Bishop 
W. M. Weekley at the Conference at 
Dallastown, on Oct. 16. 



Lebanon Valley Wins at 
Tennis 

On Saturday afternoon, Messrs. 
Richard Strickler and Gin, the fast 
tennis players for the town of Hum- 
melstown were defeated in doubles on 
the local courts. The ideal day 
served to put inspiration into our boys 
and they turned out as victors. 

Saylor played a splendid game by 
his accurate serving, while Ellis gain- 
ed many points by volleying The 
score according to sets: 

Lebanon Valley 2 6 6 6 6 

Hummelstown 6 3 4 2 6 2 



Professor Dodge spent Sunday in 
Philadelphia. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



I 



College fieuus 

Issued weekly during - the College 
Year by Lebanon Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

P. R. KOONTZ, '11 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. A. BRUNNER, '11 

E. A. SPESSARD, '11 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

W. O. ELLIS, '11 

F. i: . KENNEDY, '12 
CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, '12 

HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
S. O. GRIMM, '12 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
W. A. Brunner, '11, 
ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 

OLIVER BUTTERWICK '12 
PAUL LOSER, '13 



Subscription Price SI. 00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 



Address all business communications 
to W. A. Brunneu, Box 916, all other 
matter to COLLEGE News, Annville, 
Pa. 

Editorial 

Who is who, and why? Is the 
college the primary organization or is 
the class? Does a man owe his first 
duty to his Alma Mater or to his class? 
Should an underclassman be taught 
class-spirit or college-spirit? These are 
questions all tending to the same an- 
swer, but illustrative of a fact, the 
importance of which too many students 
are ignorant. 

The next is?ue of "The College 
News" will contain an account of an 
inter-class-contsst. The right of su- 
premacy of one class over another, ac- 
cording to college etiquette, is of 
great impoi t because it is the sum- 
mum bonum of all underclaspmen's 
aspirations. Here is the point upon 
which Freshmen are wrongly instruct- 
ed. In itself the right of supremacy 
is all well and good, but when it is 
held higher than the weal of the col- 
lege, it bfcotr.es a dangerous thing. 
Dangerous because it causes a stu- 
dent first comir.g under its influences, 
to become selfish in his views, inso- 
lent in his actions, destructive in his 
habits and weak in nis charac er. 

It is true that a Freshman is never 
blamed for anything that he does and 
justly so; but it should strike him for- 
cibly, to know that he is expected to 
work firbt for the interests of the col- 



lege that has so graciously taken him 
under her care. His class interests 
should not in the least be diminished 
but lather strengthened. 

It is soon evident what attitude a 
Freshman takes towards this question. 
Perhaps he is not altogether to be 
blamed if he goes wrong. But the 
man who loves college more than class, 
will submit himself to authority, very 
promptly. He will not wait to be 
called upon to carry a varsity man's 
suit-case to the train when the team 
leaves, and will be just as prompt to 
receive them when they return. He will 
consider it his duty to obey all rules 
as laid down by the Senior Junior 
council because it is a recognized au- 
thorit/ . The men who come to col- 
lege ,come to be trained ,and why 
should they fail to recive training 
in that which all men need and few 
have— respect for authority, or in 
other words, the true spirit of subordi- 
nation ? We can never lead until we 
are willing to be led. 

The manager of the foot ball field 
often has to suffer because under- 
classmen have no conception of col- 
lege spirit. The field must be lined 
off; goal posts must be planted and a 
hundred other things have to be done 
whic h an underlassrnan is so admir- 
ably fitted to do because he has not 
yet been trusted with higher and more 
weighty duties. These come in their 
turn. 

It is certain that most underclass- 
men view this matter from a some- 
what different angle, and imagine that 
these duties are thrust upon them for 
the m c re reason that they are under- 
classmen. This is not the case. 
There is another and saner reason. 
Those duties are given to him because 
it is not quite in keeping to give the 
managership of athletic teams, the 
editorship of papers and other publica- 
tions and the chairmanship of com- 
mittees to Freshmen and Snphmores. 
We need not go into detail as to just 
why this is so. It behooves every 
uderclassman not to bethink himself 
too seriously of his class dignity, but 
remember that the interests of his col- 
lege come first and that he who does 
well those duties given him when an 
under-classssman, will receive the 
higher and larger duties ol an upper- 
classman. 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



KALOZETEAN 
Chorus, Society; Essay, Kipling as 
a humorist, D. C. Kiester; Hum- 
orous Reading, I. L. Ressler; Instru- 
mental Selection, J. F. Reed; Sketch, 
"Lebanon Bunch ;" Humorous Read- 
ing, J. W« Ischey ; Chorous, Soci- 
ety ; Examiner, Editor. Visitors 
Invited. 

CLIONIAN 

Piano Duet, Carrie Light, Lizzie 
Lau; Reading, Edith Lehman; life 
Work of Florence Nightingle, Edna 
Kilmer; Original Stories, Helen 
Weidler, Clara Horn; Vocal Duet, 
Edith G'ngrich, Ora Bachman; Our 
Estim \te of Mark Twain, Sara 
Zmmerman ; Olive Branch, Editor; 
Piano Solo, Ruth Engle. 

PHILOKOSMIAN] 

Current Events, J. Maurice Leister; 
The annexation of Korea by 
Japan, Lester A. Rhodes; Debate, 
Resolved : That the government should 
ad ipt the pircels-spost-ystem ; affir- 
mative, J. C. Shively, J. K. Lehman; 
negative, John Sherk, J. Edward 
Marshall; Vocal Solo, L. L. Spessard; 
Benefits of a Student Benedict, Paul 
Loser; Living Thoughts, Editor. ; 



Conservatory Notes and An- 
nouncements 

The Conservatory Students' Organiza- 
tion met in the auditorium of Engle 
Hall, Tuesday afternoon, October 
11th, 1910, for the first Recital class of 
the. year. Election of the officers was 
as follows— President, Miss Ora 
Bachman; Vice President, Mr. Scott 
Anderson; Secretary, Miss Bertha 
Spessard; Treasurer, Miss Florence 
Roland. The program consisted of 
vocal solos by Misses Roland, Fohz, 
Emenheiser, Fink, and Mr. Anderson, 
and piano numbers by Misses K. 
Gingrich, Kindry, Frantz, Spayd, 
Weidman, and Gantz. 

The recital classes are not open to 
the public, the purpose being to give 
students the opportunity of stage ex- 
perience. Suggestions concerning 
stage deportment, the introduction of 
discussions on musical topics, the 
benefit derived from seeing and hear- 
ing how fellow students do things 
are some of the features of these 
meetings each month. 



i 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Items of Interest 



Miss Mary Nissley of Middletown, 
Pa., has returned to college to resume 
her studies in the art department. 
P Dr. J. E. Fout of Bonebrake The- 
ological Seminary addressed chapel 
on Tuesday morning. Dr. Fout repre- 
sented the Seminary at the East Penn- 
sylvania and Pennsylvania conferences 
of the U. B. Church. 

President Keister attended the 
Conference at Dallastown. 

The students all enjoyed a fire scare 
on Thursday, as it gave the Professors 
•an excuse to dismiss their classes 
half hour before time. 

H. E. Ulrich, of Harrisburg, has re- 
turned to college. 

Mr. Artus 0. Kauffman '11, is visiting 
his parents in Dallastown. 

Mr. Fred L. Frost '11, spent Sunday 
with Mr. A. D. Strickler, at Lehigh 
University. 

Mr. Feldman has been called home 
because of the illness of his mother. 

Professor Wanner accompanied the 
team to Allentown on Saturday. 

Miss Florence Clippinger, '13, was 
in Bristol, Pa., on Wednesday last at- 
tending the wedding of her brother, 
Charles. 

Mr. E. E. Yake, ex-'U, was elect- 
ed Editor-in-chief of the "Epitome" 
published by the class of 1912 of Le- 
high University. 

Professor S. H Derickson who has 
been sick for some time is again £ble 
to be about. 

Miss Florence Clippinger, '13, a 
member of the executive committee of 
the Y. P. S. C. E, of the Pennsyl- 
vania Conference, attended the session 
Thursday evening at Dallastown. 

Professor H. E. Spessard, wife and 
childen spent a few days at Chews- 
ville, Maryland, the home of Mrs. 
Spessard. Professor Spessard had 
poultry on exhibit at the great Hagers- 
town Fair, which won first and fourth 
prizes for him. 

Mr. Paul R. Koontz, '11, spent a 
few days in York, Pa., and attended 
some of the sessions of the Pennsyl- 
vania Conference at Dallastown. 



Miss Grace Smith, '12, Oratory 
spent Sunday at her home in Reading, 
Pa. 

Paul E. Holdcraft preached in the 
Christ Lutheran Church at Dallas- 
town on Sunday evening" 

A. H. Weige '13 was appointed 
pastor of the Shepherdstown Church 
for the next Conference year. 

N. B. S. Thomas '12 was appoint- 
ed pastor of the Mechanicsburg 
circuit. 

Miss Evelyn Weidman spent Satur- 
day and [Sunday as the guest of her 
parents at New Holland. 

Professor Sleichter was in Al- 
toona over Sunday as the guest of her 
sister Miss Rhoda Brandt. 

Miss Meeta Daan spent Saturday 
and Sunday at Penryn Pa., as the 
guest of her parents. 

Miss Evelyn Ely returned on Satur- 
day from her home in Hagerstown, 
Md., when she was visiting the past 
week. 



Biological Field Club. 

The second monthly meeting of the 
Biological Field Club was held on 
Wednesday evening of last week. The 
program which was exceptionally in- 
teresting was rendered before a large 
and interested audience. 

Mr. E. A. Spessard who accompani- 
ed Professor Derickson and his party 
to Bermuda several summers ago, 
gave a short account of how 
sponges grow and are gathered. He 
also gave a short description of the 
structure of a sponge. 

Mr. F. R. Kennedy, a native of 
Jamaica, presented a lecture on sev- 
eral of the most important vegetables 
and fruits used in that land of the 
West Indies. Mr. Kennedy is always 
an interesting and able talker, but 
his number on this program proved 
exceptionally interesting. Among 
many others, he presented the native 
aople, mango and the coffee plant. 
Eery person who heard him could not 
help but be filled with a desire to 
some day visit that land of the Sunny 
South. 

Mr. Lester Spessard read a paper 
on the Hypnotism of Annimals, which 
threw a great deal of light upon the 
subject. Since man is biologicaly an 
animal, he was to a certain extent 



included in the discourse. Mr. 
Spessard gave a clear idea of what 
hypnotyism is and carefully distin- 
guished i* from several other psych- 
logical phenomena closely allied to it, 
but quite distinct. He also showed the 
difference of hypnotyism in men and 
in animals. 



Y. M. C. A. 

There was an interesting meeting 
of tho Y. M. C. A. on Sunday after- 
noon. During the previous meetings 
held since school opened, the various 
committees have had the opportunity 
to present the various phases of our 
work. 

On the past Sunday Mr. Oliver T. 
Ehrhart. President of the Y. M. C. 
A., presented a special message to the 
members present. His Subject was 
"Strength of Character". He 
brought out strongly the importance of 
character building in the real success- 
ful life. "Character is what a man is; 
it is the latent force in our life. We 
feel one man's presence more than an- 
other, becau e of his character. A 
foundati n is necessary for all struc- 

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PHILADELPHIA 



COLLEGE NEWS 



tures, so we must have a good basis 
for character. There are certain 
principles that we should have, which 
will stand the test of time." Among 
the principles mentioned were: Truth, 
Purity, Will Power, Resolution, In- 
dependance and Individuality. 

An interesting discussion followed. 
Mr. Leibold showed that in past his- 
tory men emphasized strongly, phys- 
ical bravery and mental power, while 
to-day spiritual and moral ideals pre- 
dominate. He showed the great influ- 
ence of Washington on the character 
of the nation, and other great men. 

Mr. Ritchie brought out the thou- 
ght that we might have hidden sins 
that destroy character. If we believe 
we can hide this influence "we de- 
ceive ourselves" for God will see us. 

Mr. Saylor gave us some thoughts 
on the inpression of the strong chara- 
cter at Northfield. 

Mr. E. Spessard followed with suit- 
able remarks. He said "a college is 
no stronger than its weakest member 
and that we should each find out our 
place in college life. It may be to 
attend classes regular, to play foot 
ball or to subscribe to the College 
news or maybe, all." 

Mr. Mullhollan made some rem- 
arks along the same line showing us 
that we should take a great example 
and build a character like Christ. 

Mr. Brunner showed how we should 
follow the lines of duty laid down by 
our conscience. Character is im- 
mortal. We should therefore help 
to influence some one to a higher 
plane of living. 

Mr. Ehrhart then called attention to 
the small attendance at these meet- 
ings. He urged every man to bring 
another fellow to the meetings. 

Every man in Lebanon Valley 
College should be present on 
Sunday afternoon at 1 :00 o'clock. 
The Y. M. C. A. is the place where 
character is built. Do you want us 
to help ycu on your foundation? If 
you do, then come. 



Buy a Ticket 

On Thursday evening, Oct. 20tb, the 
Clionian Literary Society will present 
in Engle Conservatory, a highly enter- 
taining comedy in three acts called 
"Breezy Point." 

Prepartions for this play were 



begun before the close of the college 
term last spring. The girls in the 
caste have put a great deal of time on 
it and being under the excellent in- 
struction of Mrs. Eby, professor of 
Oratory, they will without doubt 
make it one of the most enjoyable pre- 
sentations of the year. 

The play has been a great success 
wherever it has been given. It is of 
a high class and full of rich humor. Let 
everybody come and enjoy a laugh. 
Don't fail to be present. Remember 
the date, Thursday Oct. 20. 



Occasionally a man does the right 
thing at the right time. 

jCebanon 2/allet/ 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 
jCawrence Jfeister, iPres. 

Kodaks, Cameras 
and Supplies 

Printing and Developing for Amateurs 

HARPEL'S ART STORE 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Learn Wireless & R. R. Telegraphy 

Shortage of fully 10,000 Operators on account Of 
8-hour law and 'extensive "wireless" develop- 
ments. We operate under direct supervision of 
Telegraph Ofllcials and positively place all stu- 
dents, when qualified. Write for catalogue- 

NatM Telegraph Institute 

Cincinnati, Philadelphia Memphis, Davenport 
la., Columbia, S. C, Portland, Ore. 



H.G.Spaiaing&Bros. 



The 



Spalding 

TRADE MARK 




Is known throughout 
the world as a 

Guarantee of 
Quality 



Are the largest 
manufacturers in 
the world of 

Official 
Equipment 

For All 
Athletic 
Sports and 
Pastimes 

are in 
teres t - 
e d in 
Athletic Sport you 
should have acopy 
of the Spalding 
Catalogue. It's a 
complete encyclo- 
pedia o f What's 
New in Sport and 
is sent free or. 
request. 



IF YOU 



A. Q. Spalding & Bro. 
1120 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

You are correct if you get your 

LADIES 1 and GENTS 1 
' FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 

Standard Steam Laundry and 
Scouring Works 

A. F. Ward '90 Proprieter 

27 N. Seventh St. Lebanon Pa. 

Represented at College 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

SCHOOL of \\ 



ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

TROY, N.Y. 



Send for a Catalogue. 



CFull line of College Post Cards, 
Writing Papers, Envelopes, Tablets. 
Pens, Pencils, Ink, Pictures, Pen' 
nants, Box Paper, Photopaste. Also Eyes 
Examined and Glasses Fitted. 

D. B. SHIFFER 
WEST MAIN STREET ANNVILLE, PA. 




COIiliEGE HEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume II. 



Annville, Pa., Tuesday, October* 25, 1910 



Jio. 5 



FOOT BALL 



L. V. Outplays Gettysburg in the In- 
augural Game, Although She 
Loses 24-0 

What was, to the writers mind, the 
hardest fought game of the season 
thus far, was played last Thursday at 
Gettysburg before 800 spectators. The 
game was marred by many injuries, 
three of our boys being carried off the 
field. Capt. Lehman won the toss 
and chose the east goal as his to de- 
fend. Capt. Aldinger kicked off and 
Hertzler ran the ball back for a gain 
of 15 yards. Our boys gained conse- 
cutively and were within 15 yards of 
our goal when Wilson was layed out. 
This weakened our offence to such an 
extend that Gettysburg held us for 
downs. Lehman tried a field goal 
but failed. Gettysburg then took the 
ball on our 25 yard line and rushed it 
through for the first score. Gettys- 
burg with old style football gained 
steadily through our line and advanced 
the pigskin to cur 15 yard line. Here 
injuries necessitated the removal of 
Loser from our line with a badly 
wrenched knee. 12-0 ended the first 
quarter. Second quarter the same sad 
tale is to be told, our boys being up 
against too heavy a team to stop the 
onslaught of their more burly opponents 
and so the second quarter ended with 
the score 18-0. 

In the third and fourth quarters our 
boys came back strong, although 
Charlton was out of the game entirely, 
which again weakened our line. L. 
V. held their opponents for downs twice 
within their one yard line. Here 
again L. V. was within 15 yards of her 
goal. Forrest tried a field goal but 
missed by three unlucky inches. In 
the fourth quarter coach Veil ran in new 
men against our exhausted eleven. 
Gettysburg again scored making the 
score 24-0. What the fellows need 



most is encouragement and not in a 
verbal form, but by coming out 
and giving them good hard scrimmage. 
Let a good bunch report this week so 
as to round out the team and put them 
in top notch condition for the Indians 
on Saturday. Let us prove the white 
man's superiority by defeating the 
redskins on Saturday. The line-up 
was as follows : Kreider, right end; 
Paul Loser, right tackle; Biever, 
right guard; Marshall, center; Ken- 
nedy, left guard ; Charlton, Harnish, 
left tackles; Hays, left end; Light, 
right half; Lehman, Capt., fullback; 
Wilson, Erb, left half ; Frost, Forrest, 
quarter back. 



Star Course 

The Star Course committee of the 
Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. has 
contracted for an excellent series of 
entertainments to be held at different 
periods of the year from Oct., 29, 
1910, to March 20,1911 inclusive. It 
has been the aim to increase the popu- 
larity of the course and to strengthen 
its quality. The committee feels 
free to announce that they have pro- 
cured the best entertainers the agency 
offers. 

Tickets are now on sale. Season 
ticket, $1.00 each; single tickets, 35 
cents each. All are expected to help 
the cause along by purchasing one or 
more season tickets. 



Y. W. C. A. 

The Y. W. C. A. meeting on Sun» 
day afternoon, was led by Miss Lizzie 
Lau. The subject was "Our Savior's 
Greatest Promise." The leader com- 
mented upon it in an interesting and 
helpful way but there was not very 
much general discussion on the sub- 
ject. Every girl in the association 
should show her interest by being 
present end taking an active part in 
the meetings. 



Calendar. 

Wednesday, October 26, 7 p. m. — 
Mathematical Round Table. 

Friday, October 28, 7:15 p. m.— 
Societies. 

Saturday, October 29, —3 p. m., 
Football, Lebanon Valley vs. Indian 
Reserves; 7:45 p m, Star Course, 
Strickland W. Gillilan. 

Sunday, October 30—1 p. m.. 
Christian associations. 

Monday October 31— 8 p. m., Hal- 
low'en Party. 

Tuesday, November 1—6. p. m., Stu- 
dents' Prayer Meeting. 




Rev. G. I. Rider, '05, pastor of 
Grace U. B. Church, Hagerstovcn, Md., 
visited friends in Annville over Sun- 
day, and led the devotions in Chapel on 
Monday morning. 

Rev. W. H. Washinger, D.D., '91, 
was re-elected superintendent of the 
Pennsylvania Conference at the Dallas- 
town sessions. Dr. Washinger has 
held this position ever since the Con- 
ference was formed into one district. 
The progress of the churches under his 
jurisdiction during this time are the 
best testimonials of his ability and 
success. By his efforts the highest 
salary limit in the entire church was 
obtained for the ministers of the Penn- 
sylvania Conference. The "News" 
congratulates Dr. Washinger, and 
wishes him great success. 

Hon. S. C. Huber, '92, of Tama, 
Iowa, is running for Congressman on 
the Democratic ticket in the present 
campaign. Mr. Huber was principle 
of the high school and also superin- 
tendent of the city schools. In 1896 
(Continued on page 4) 



I 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fleaus 

Issued weekly during the College 
Year by Lebanon Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

P. R. KOONTZ, '11 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. A. BRUNNER, '11 

E. A. SPESSARD, '11 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

W. O. ELLIS, '11 

F. R. KENNEDY, '12 
CATHARINE E. HERS HEY, '12 

HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
S. O. GRIMM, '12 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
W. A. Brunner, '11, 
ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 

OLIVER BUTTER WICK '12 
PAUL LOSER, '13 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 
to W. A. Brunner, Box 916, all other 
matter to College News, Annville, 
Pa. 



Editorial 

If you can't help conditions at school 
don't make the atmosphere foul by 
your continual grumbling. Bad eggs 
can do as much. 

The conditions of athletics at Leb- 
anon Valley may at times seem rather 
discouraging, but we have no reason 
to despair. Every cloud has a silver 
lining, and indications are that this 
side will soon be turned. We are 
not first in athletics, but considering 
the way in which we are handicapped 
by indifference among those who 
should lead in spirit, we on the ave- 
rage, make a good showing among the 
small colleges of our state, with whom 
we have athletic relations. 

There is one field however in which 
we are proud to say we stand second 
to none. There is one phase of col- 
lege life ex'sting here that has been 
praised from convention platforms in 
every section of our state. This is 
our Y. M. C A. 

At the President's Convention held at 
State College last spring our Presi- 
dent was made chairman of the policy 
committee which is the most important 
committee of the convention. Out 
Association furnished one of the four 
bands of men who under the auspices 
of the State Association did religious 
work among the Lumbei Jacks the 



past summer. During the past year 
we have organized and successfully 
conducted a school for foreigners, in 
which more than twenty foreign speak- 
ing men are taught, by the most mod- 
ern methods, the use of the English 
language. As a direct result of 
which two men have received their 
naturaliaztion papers. 

The progressive spirit which our As- 
sociation has shown toward all such 
movements which have for their goal 
the extension of our power and in- 
fluence for good led the Ex-State Sec- 
retary, Mr. Kohler, to call ours the 
most representative college association 
of the state. 

This, then, is a phase of college life 
of which we can be proud. Our asso- 
ciation stands as a power and should 
enlist the services of all the fellows 
who wish to make their lives count in 
the great battle for reform and civic 
righteousness that is sweeping over 
our country. In every college there 
are certain peculiar conditions which 
tend to make the atmosphere of the 
district from all other institutions, 
and Lebanon Valley hasher full share. 
Our societies and their organizations 
tend to divide our male student body 
against itself, and if no opposing 
force was offered mighc work to our 
detriment if not our ruin. The Y. M. 
C. A. happily offers just the force 
needed to bind us in one solid mass. 
Here the fellows can meet on common 
ground and discuss without reserve all 
the questions which perplex and annoy 
them. These heart to heart expres- 
sions tend to cheer, comfort, and in- 
spire. They clear our atmosphere and 
cast into the backgrounds all the 
pretty jealousies which may arise from 
class and society differences. They 
sweeten life for all. 

No other organization should com- 
mand more respect or a larger follow- 
ing, for in serving it we serve all. 
In advancing its standard we lift our 
whole institution to a higher plane of 
service and extend her influence to 
those quarters where it is most need- 
ed. Let every student pledge himself 
to offer his best efforts this most 
worthy cause. 



Prof. H. E. Wanner witnessed the 
Lebanon Valley-Gettysburg game at 
Gettysburg on Thursday. 



Breezy Point* 

The first performance of the year 
proved to be a great success when the 
members of the Clionian Literary So- 
ciety presented "Breezy Point," a 
play in three acts, to a large and ap- 
preciative audience in Engle Conserva- 
tory on Thursday evening Oct. 20th., 
1910. This play was given for the 
benefit of the Clio Society under the 
direction of Lillian Cairns Eby. The 
first act captivated the audience and the 
latter two kept up the interest to the 
very last and the audience departed 
very much pleased with the rendition. 

All of the characters were extreme- 
ly interesting. Cast of characters 
follows : 

Aunt Debby Dexter, Mistress o 
Breezy Point, Edna Yarkers; Elinor 
Pearl, of unknown parentage, Edith 
Lehman; Ashrael Grant, a maid of all 
work, Lottie Spessard; Mrs. Hard- 
scratch, with business propensities, 
Bertha Spessard; The Hardscratch 
Twins, who "never tell nothin'," Ora 
Bachman, Edith Gingrich; Mehitible 
Doolittle, Manufacture of catarrh 
snuff and bitters, Grace Smith; Ber- 
nice Veron, Carrie Light; Laura Le- 
high, Clara Horn; Edith Norton, Flor- 
ence Christeson; Clarice Fenleigh, 
Elizabeth Lau ; (Aunt Debby's Summer 
Boarders) Fantine, Miss Vernon's 
French Maid, Verda Snyder; Old 
Clem, the Gypsy, Helen Brightbill. 



Rev. Dougherty Weds 

Rev. Raymond P. Daugherty, '97, 
principal of Albert Academy and well 
known at the college, wa3 married re- 
cently in Dayton Ohio, to Miss Lulu 
Landis, daughter of Rev. J. P. Landis 
of Bonebrake Theological Seminary. 

Mr. and Mrs. Daugherty arrived in 
Lebanon last week and will spend 
some time visiting the former's 
mother, Mrs. Daugherty. The couple 
will remain east until some time in 
December, when they leave for 
Africa, where Rev. Daugherty will 
resume his work. 



A Correction 

In a recent issue of this paper, the 
name of Rev. Shoop appeared with the 
class numeral '12. We beg leave to 
correct the error, Rev. Shoop is a 
member of the clasi, of 1911. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



PHILOKOSMIAN 
Current Events, Henry Kreider; 
Theodore Roosevelt as the advocate of 
the Strenous Life, A. H. Weigle; 
Debate, Resolved : That the national 
party lines should be abolished in 
municipal elections, affirmnative, 
Edward Kreider, Paul R. Koontz; 
Negative, C. C. Smith, W. C. Shoop; 
Vocal Solo, E. A. Spessard; Wood- 
row Wilson, G. A. Richie. 

CLIONIAN 
An evening with Robert Burns. 
Instrumental solo, Evelyn Weidman; 
Sketch of Burn's Life. Blanch Risser; 
Selection from Burns, Kathryn Clous- 
er; quartet, "Bonnie Doone," Edith 
Lehman, Florence Clippinger, Lottie 
Spessard, Helen Brightbill; essay, 
Burns, the Man, Sara Zimmerman; 
vocal solo, "John Anderson, My Joe 
John," Verda Snyder; essay, Burns, 
the Poet, Forence Clippinger; selec- 
tion," Wert Thou in a Could Blast" 
quartet; reading, "Cotter's Saturday 
Night," Helen Weidler ; chorus, Auld 
Lang Sjne, society. 

KALOZETEAN 
Happenings of the week, Edgar 
Landis; My Idea of Football, W. D. 
Biever ; chorus, society ; Debate, Re- 
solved : That Lebanon Valley should 
have a track team this year, affirma- 
tive, Paul Strickler and F. L. Frost; 
negative, Warrren Hayes and Edward 
Mutch; The World's Championship 
Series, John Lyter; original poem, 
Paul Holdcraft; chorus, society. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

Continued from page 1 



he was admitted to the county bar, 
and has enjoyed a large practice. He 
is now seiving his third term as coun- 
ty attorney of Tama county. "The 
Tama News" says: "The district 
will be well represented if he is elect- 
ed to congress, and his consistency 
will have a representative upon whom 
they can depend. " 

Miss Violet Prout, '09, Conserva- 
tory, was the guest of Miss Edith 
Frantz, of Lebanon on Thursday and 
Friday. 

Misses Lucy Seltzer, '10, and Sallie 
Kreider, '08, of Lebanon, witnessed 
"Breezy Point," at the college on 
Thursday. 



Dr. M. W. Brunner, '01, Rev. S. 
Edwin Rupp, '01, spent Thursday fish- 
ing at the Swatara Creek, 

Nelle Reed, '04, who was one of the 
cottage matrons at the Philadelphia 
girl house of Refuge for the past year, 
sailed Oct. 22nd for Ponce, Porto Rico, 
where she will spend the winter with 
her sister. 

Professor A. Bender, '06, and 
Miss LaVerne Keister, of Brooklyn, 
attended the Yale-Army game at West 
Point on Satuiday Oct. 15th. 

Dr. George W. Hursh, '77, Newville, 
Pa. died recently. 

Professor J. T. Spangler, D.D., 
'90, of Mt. Joy, visited friends at the 
college on last Friday. 

Roy J. Guyer, 'OS, former foot ball 
coach at Lebanon Valley, is at present 
physical director in the railroad Y. M. 
C. A. at Marshalltown, Iowa. 

The following alumni subscriptions 
have been received during the past 
week; D. E. Weidler, '09, Anderson, 
Ind, J. T. Yoder, '10. Southampton, 
N. Y., Allen Rutherford, '10, 
Baltimore, Md. and H. K. Bomberger, 
'10, Ligonier, Pa. 

Dr. and Mrs. H. M. Imboden, both 
of the class of 1899, of Clifton Springs, 
N. Y., are spending the week with 
his psrents in Lebanon. 

Y. M. C. A. 

Al hough the meeting on Sunday 
afternoon was not as well attended as 
pome previous meetings, there was, 
nevertheless, a deep spiritual tone 
manifested. Mr. Brunner presented 
his subject in an able and earnest 
manner. In "Apparent Failures in 
the Christian Life," he showed that 
success in the Christian life "was not 
attained by sudden flight," but by 
striving for the happy medium in our 
lives, and by being lenient in our 
judging of others. Two principles 
were presented. First, look to our 
own experience and see what it may 
mean to us, and second, look at the 
other fellows. If our own ideal in 
life is further away at the end than 
the beginning of our lives, we should 
not think we are apparant failures. 
If we strive after the best, our lives 
will not have been apent in vain. An 
interesting discussion followed the ad- 
dress. 




Items of Interest 



A. O. Kauffman, '11, visited L. A. 
Rodes, '14, at. his home in Wormleys- 
burg over Sunday. 

Miss Edna Yarkers, '13, was the 
guest of Miss Carrie Ligh^, '12, at 
Jonestown over Sunday. 

P. R. Koontz, '11. preached in the 
Hebron U. B. Church, Lebanon, on 
Sunday morning. 

O. T. Ehrhart, '11, and V. D. 
Mulhollen, '13, attended the corner 
stone laying at the new U. B. Church 
at Jonestown on Sunday. 

Dr. Lawrence Keister attended the 
inaugural ceremonies at Gettysburg on 
Thursday. He was one of the many 
college presidents and representatives 
attending. 

Many people from Lebanon and 
vicinity attended the play given by the 
Clionian Literary Society on Thursday 
evening. 

Have Your Printing Done by 

The Journal Publishing Co. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 
$hen You Want THE BETTER GRADE 

Frederick W. Light 
826 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa, 

Representing 
Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Co. 
Of Milwaukee, Wis. 




Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Rev. B. F. Musselman, a missionary 
from Africa, preached in the local U. 
B. Church on Snuday morning. 

The men who were injured in the 
Gettysburg game are slowly improv- 
ing. Harry Charlton, '14, is still 
confined to his room with his ankle 
sprain. 

Frank Shearer, '13, spent Saturday 
and Sunday with his parents in Harris- 
burg. 

Forrest Hensel, '12, Oliver Butter- 
wick, '12, and George Zullinger, '14, 
were in Harrisburg on Saturday after- 
noon. 

Ralph Riegle spent Sunday in 
Millersburg as the guest of his mother. 

Coach Forrest and Harry Bender 
spent Saturday and Sunday attending 
a house party at Mt.Gretna. 

Donald Keister, 12, and Josiah F. 
Reed, '12, accompanied by Misses 
Edith Morrison, '14, and Catharine 
Hershey, '12, took an automobile trip 
to Gettysburg on Thursdy, where they 
witnessed the Leanon Valley-Gettys- 
burg foot ball game. 

The following students witnessed 
the game Thursday at Gettysurg : 
Hummel, '14, Curry, '14, Riegle, 
Ressler, '12, and Dunlap. 

O. T. Ehrhart, '11, was recently 
appointed pastor of the Hebron U. B. 
Church, Lebanon, after the resigna- 
tion of the pastor appointed at the 
Conference. Dr. Lowery, superin- 
tendent of the conference, made the 
appointment. 



Ministerial Association 

The regular meeting of the College 
Ministerial Association was held last 
Thursday evening with a good attend- 
ance. Routine business was transact- 
ed and three new members added to the 
association. S. G. Zeigler, '11, read 
an interes f ing and instructive paper on 
the subject, "What the Minister De- 
mands of the Laiety, " A general dis- 
cussion followed. Rev. D. E. Long, 
Field Secretary of the College, will 
address the next meeting when a full 
attendance is desired. 



Attention 

The value of the prestige our college 
offers to her sons and daughters in- 
creases in the same proportion as her 
fame . Her strength increases in 
the same ratio. Every alumnus and 
student of Lebanon Vallev owes 



her a debt which can be meet in one and 
only one way. Subscribe for the 
"News." Help her by securing ad- 
vertisements. Let every friend of 
Lebanon Valley rally to the support 
of her only paper, the COLLEGE 
NEWS. 

oCebanon Valley 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 
Lawrence Jfeister, !Pres. 
jfnnvillej tPa. 

Kodaks, Cameras 
and Supplies 

Printing and Developing for Amateurs 

HARPEL'S ART STORE 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Learn Wireless & R. R. Telegraphy 

Shortage of fully 10,000 Operators on account of 
8-hour law and 'extensive "wireless" develoP" 
ments. We operate under direct supervision ot 
Telegraph Officials and positively place all stu- 
dents, when qualified. Write for catalogue. 

Nat'l Telegraph Institute 

Cincinnati, Philadelphia Memphis, Davenport 
la., Columbia, S. C, Portland, Ore. 



If you want Good 

Engraving 

Try the 

Electric City Engraving 
Company Buffalo, N. Y. 



H.G.Spalding&Bros. 



The 



Spalding 

TRADE MARK 




Is known throughout 
the world as a 

Guarantee of 
Quality 



Are the largest 
manufacturers in 
the world of 

Official 
Equipment 

For All 
Athletic 
Sports and 
Pastimes 

are in 
teres t - 
e d in 
Athletic Sport you 
should have acopy 
of the Spalding 1 
Catalogue. It's a 
complete encyclo- 
pedia o f What's 
New in Sport and 
is sent free on 
request. 



IF YOU 



A. Q. Spalding & Bro. 
1120 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

You are correct if you get your 

LADIES' and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 

Standard Steam Laundry and 
Scouring Works 

A. F. Ward '90 Proprieter 

27 N. Seventh St. Lebanon Pa. 

Represented at College 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

SCHOOL of V\ 



ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Send for a Catalogue. TROY, N.Y. 



CFull line of College Post Cards, 
Writing Papers, Envelopes, Tablets. 
Pens, Pencils, Ink, Pictures, Pen 
nants, Box Paper, Photopaste. Also Eyes 
Examined and Glasses Fitted. 

D. B. SHIFFER 
WEST MAIN STREET ANNVILLE, PA 





Volume II. 



Annville, Pa., Tuesday, flovembei* 1, 1910 



Ho. 6 



Faculty Loses 

Honored Member 

MRS. EBY RESIGNS AS HEAD 
OF ORATORY DE- 
PARTMENT 

The NEWS regrets to announce 
the resignation of Mrs. Lillian Cairns 
Eby as Director of the depatment of 
Oratoy and Pubilc speaking. Notice 
was given last week owing to a call 
coming to Rev J. A .Eby to serve as 
pastor of the First U. B. Church, Los 
Angeles, California. 

The report that the work in Oratory 
will be discontinued or carried under 
inferior conditions is altogether un- 
founded. President Keister has re- 
quested Mrs. Eby to procure another 
Emerson graduate to fill the vacancy, 
and thus continue the present system 
which has proved itself so valuable 
during the past year. Just when this 
resignation will take effect has not 
been published, but it is understood 
that the new director will take charge 
before Mrs. Eby leaves for California, 
and the present senior class in Oratory 
will graduate as intended. 

The next issue of the NEWS * ill 
announce the exact date when Mr. J. 
W. Ischy will present his Senior re- 
cital. Mr. Ischy will read a cutting 
from J. G. Hollands "Seven Oaks," 
and will be assisted by the other 
members of the Senior Class. Nearly 
a year has been spent in preparation 
for this recital which will require be- 
tween an hour and an hour and a half 
in rendition. The other member of 
the Senior class will give recitals at 
times stated later. 



Prof. H. E. Wanner, head of the 
Department of Chemistry and Physics, 
was in Philadelphia on Saturday 
where he witnessed the Penn-Indian 
foot ball game. 



Lebanon Valley Loses Again 

Lebanon Valley again went down to 
defeat at the hands of the redskins to 
the tune of 20 to 5. During the first 
quarter the Indians were out played 
and |Lebanon Valley pushed the ball 
across the line for a touchdown but 
failed the goal. At the end of the 
quarter Harnish, centre, and Hensel, 
right tackle were taken out because 
of injuries. During the second quarter 
the Indians rallied and scored a field 
goal. Lebanon Valley's line ^was 
very much weakened by the substitu- 
tions but the Indians were held for 
downs when the first half ended. 

During the third quarter the In- 
dians pushed the ball twice across 
the line, Johnny Jon, Carlisle.s full- 
back made a forty yard end run for a 
touch down. During the third quarter 
the Indians scored another touch- 
down. Captain Lehman did excel- 
lent punting for Lebanon Valley., his 
throwing of forward passes against a 
strong wind was a feature of the game. 
Hayes and Marshall were also in the 
game to the finish, and did fine tack- 
ling. 

The game was fast. Lebanon 
Valley played an open game while the 
Indians frequently resorted to the old 
line plunges. Both teams were fre- 
quently penalized. During the first 
half the Indians were defeated but 
the last half showed that the redskins 
had the greater power of endurance. 

The results of the game were not 
what we should like to have seen. 
Our team played an excellent game, 
circumstances considered. We should 
like to have a winning team and all 
of our defeats are exceptionally 
disappointing to us, the student body, 
for we feel that our team is doing 
the very best it can, when those high- 
est in authority, who should encour- 
age athletics, are opposing them with 
and main. 



Calendar. 

Tuesday, Nov. 1, 6 p. m. Prayer 
meeting. 

Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2 p. m. Meet- 
ing of Woman's Board at home of 
Mrs. Keister. 

Thursday, Nov. 3, 6 p. m. Minis- 
terial Association. 

Friday, Nov. 4, 7 :15 p. m. Societies. 

Sunday, Nov. 6, 1 p. m. Christian 
Associations. 



Star Course 

The first number of the Star Course 
was rendered on Saturday evening in 
Engle Hall. 

There was a good attendance from 
the school and town. 

Strickland W. Gillilan proved him- 
self to be a humorist indeed. He 
treated topics that were close to life 
in a pleasant way. His manner was 
natural and he left a wholesome effect 
with his audience. In every way this 
number was a success. 




Alumni 




Born to Professor and Mrs. C. B. 
Pennypacker, a son. Mrs. Penny- 
packer was a member of the class of 
'93. 

Professor N. C. Schclihter, '97, 
spent a few hours, between trains, 
calling on friends in Annville on 
Wednesday afternoon. 

Judge and Mrs. C. V. Henry, Mr. 
and Mrs. A. S. Kreider and Mrs. 
Gideon R. Kreider took an auto- 
mobile trip through the New England 
States. Mrs. Henry graduated in '92. 

Rev. R. E. Morgan, '08, laid the 
cornerstone at the Jonestown U. B. 
Church, on Sunday Oct. 23. 

(Continued on page 4) 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fletus 

Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

P. R. KOONTZ, '11 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. A. BRUNNER, '11 

E. A. SPESSARD, '11 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
W. O. ELLIS, '11 

F. R. KENNEDY, '12 
CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, '12 

HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
S. O. GRIMM, '12 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
W. A. Brunner, '11, 
ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 

OLIVER BUTTER WICK '12 
PAUL LOSER, '13 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75, els. 

Address all business communications 
to W. A. Brunner, Box 91(5, all other 
matter to Room 19, Administration 
Building Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pa. 



SMILE!!! 

Pay your college bills. 

Strange how many married people 
are found at L. V. C. 

Many are the problems which are 
confronting the American people to- 
day. Great questions are assuming: 
greater mangnitude in politics, in 
religion, and in every phase of life. 
Thousands of young men and women 
are in the colleges of ouriand, train- 
ing for leadership to help to make the 
existing conditions better. And to 
whum can the world look with greater 
hope and expectation than to the col- 
lege trained man or woman ? It is the 
college graduate who is expected to 
be able to meet problem after problem, 
bringing his solutions with him. On 
him in a few short ytars will the 
people place the great responsibility 
of public trust. To him will the 
people look for judgment, tact and 
management. 

In a few days the vcters of our 
country will be going to the polls to 
cast their votes for their choice of 
candidates to rule the states, and to 
represent them in the national Legis- 
lature. Many are the issues of the 
present campaign which draw the at- 
tention of the intelligent voter. None 



among them are of greater importance 
than the great evil of the liquor tiaffic. 
The solving of this problem has been 
of the utmost importance for a num- 
ber of years, but the correct solution 
is apparently yet to be found. At- 
tempts are being made which are part- 
ly successful, but still remain too 
weak to be effective in the national 
campaign. 

Reforms were wrought in various 
foreign countries by the uprising of 
the students of the colleges and uni- 
versities. In like manner the opposi- 
tion to the rum traffic is being brought 
before the American college students, 
not only thnugh the national party, 
but through the effective work and or- 
ganization of the Collegiate Irohibi- 
tion Leagues. Their purpose is to ac- 
quaint college men more fully with 
the real conditions, and tnrough their 
work, to furnish to the public the 
knowledge of what harm the saloon 
is dosing to the American youth today. 
They attempt through their organiza- 
tions to make the public see more 
clearly the vice, the murder, the 
misery and the poverty which the 
presence of the saloon necessitates. 

An effective way of doing this is 
in the annual State Oratorial Con- 
tests between representatives of the 
Collegiate Prohibition Leagues 
throughout the State. Each contest- 
ant chooses some phase of the liquor 
problem as the subject of his oration. 
These orations, for the best of which, 
a prize of fifty dollars is given, are 
delivered at a pubile entertainment at 
some college in the state We are 
glad to say that the representative 
from Lebanon Valley succeeded in 
winning fisrt prize in last year's con- 
test, which was the first in which we 
were represented. Lebanon Valley 
will also entertain the State Orator- 
ical contest and Convention of Col- 
legiate Prohibition Leagues next April. 
This is a chpnee for every college in 
Pennsylvania to show the strength of 
its department of public speaking, and 
also to present to the people greater 
light on the subject which should be 
extremely important to them. Col- 
lege men need the information as well 
as the regular citizens, and this is a 
splendid way to show the strength and 
power of the vast student body of our 
state and the United States. Let every 



College in Pennsylvania take interest 
in the work of the Collegiate Prohibi- 
tion League, and by so doing, assist 
in strengthening both Church and 
State. 

With the success with which these 
leagues have been meeting, it is be- 
coming more and more apparent that 
the solution of the liquor problem is 
one which is dependent largely on the 
College students. With the increase 
of their knowledge of the existing 
evils of this great curse their respon- 
sibility for its defeat also increases. 
It is, therefore, the duty of every 
student to exert the greatest possible 
influence to free our nation from the 
vilest and most destructive curse 
which has ever come upon the Amer- 
ican people. 

Tug of War 

About a week ago, the sophomore 
and freshmen classes pulled the rope 
on the athletic field. The perform- 
ance was not as exciting and interest- 
ing as is usual on those occasions. 

The halves were five minutes in 
length. The sophomores scored the 
first point and had practically won 
the second when the pistol closing the 
first half was fired. But it was quite 
evident at this time which of the two 
was sustaining its strength. For 
some reason the sophomores were 
completely exhausted and having no 
men to put in as substitutes, they 
had to open up the second half with a 
b dy of disabled men. 

This half the freshman consequent- 
ly walked away with the sophomores- 
One man after the other dropped out 
of the ranks of the latter and finally 
they were pulling with seven men 
against ten. 

Judging from the standard of such 
contests, it was entirely fair and the 
freshmen justly won their hard 
earned victory. The score at the finish 
was 7—1. 

One thing alone served to cast dis- 
repute on the event of the day. The 
freshman having conquered and also 
disabled the sophomores, were not 
content until they had mobbed the 
lattar as they hobbled home from their 
feed in the evening. "This was the 
most unkindest cut of all." In civil- 
ized warfare in which both opponents 
are intelligent and rational beings, 
it is customary to reopect the wounded 
and vanquished. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



CLIONIAN 
Vocal Solo, Grace Smith; German, 
Prench Dialogue, Madamoiselle Weid- 
ler, Fraulien Lehman; Humorous 
Heading, Edith McCurdy ; Piano Irio, 
Edna Kilmer. Edna Yarkers, Nellie 
Seltzer; Impersonation, Edith Ging- 
rich; Sketch, Lottie Spessard, Mary 
Spa\d; Whistling Quartet, Evelyn 
Weidman, Maud Kerschner, Ruth 
Engle, Ruth E. Engle; Olive Branch, 
Editor. 

PHILOKOSMIAN 
Resume— The Religious World, W. 
L. Murray; Benefits of Denomination- 
al Colleges, M. G. Holtzman; De- 
bate: Resoled: That Commerce has 
done more to contribute Western 
Civilization to the Orient than 
Christian Missions. Affirmative, L. 

B. Harnish, L. L. Spessard; Nega- 
tive, R. B. Saylor, T. J. Leibold ; 
Piano Duette, Paul, and Earl Loser; 
The Devil, who is he? A. 0. Kauff- 
man ; Living Thoughts, Editor. 

KALOZETEAN 
Current Events, Herman George; 
Essay, P. R. Gibble;- Chorus, soci- 
ety; Debate: Resolved that there 
should be a chapter of a National 
fraternity at L. V. C. ; Affirmative, 
I. L. Ressler, C. Y. Ulrich, Negtive, 

C. G. White, Paul Young; Quartette; 
Original Story, William Dunlap; Ex- 
aminer. 



Conservatory Recital 

The first of a series of public re- 
citals given by the Conservatory ( >upils 
was held last Thursday evening. The 
selections were all carefully prepared 
and well rendered. The students and 
public are urged to attend these re- 
citals. The program of last week's 
recital follows : 

Leschet'zky, Arabesque, pianoforte, 
Mary Spayd; Mildenberg, The Voilet, 
song, Scott Anderson ; Schutt, Capric- 
cioso, pianoforte, Ruth Engle; llaw- 
ley, The Sweetest Flower, song, Eva 
Foltz; Bach, Fantasia in C minor, 
pianoforte, E. May Meyer; Low, 
Brilliant Walzer, two pianos, M. 
Diehm and E. Gingrich ; Tostio, La 
Serenata, song, Florence Roland; 
Moszkowsky, Moment Musical, Op. V, 
No. 2, pianforte, Scott Anderson; 



Poldini, Marche Mignonne, pianoforte, 
Ora Bachman; Neidlinger, Parting, 
vocal duet, E. Gingrich and E. Foltz; 
Poldini, Etude Japonaise, pianoforte, 
Ruth Detweiler; Reinhold, Impromp- 
tu, pianoforte, Katie Gingrich; 
Smart, Hunting Song, double quartet, 
Mrs. Sheldon, Misses E. Gingrich, L. 
Spessard Brown, Messrs. Anderson, 
Frost, Botts and Hays. 

Y. W. C. A. 

The meeting on Sunday afternoon 
was led by Miss Editn Lehman. She 
presented her subject in a very 
earnest manner, emphasizing strongly 
that the college girl has innumerable 
opportunities and that God demands 
of her, her best service. 

The girls manifested a deep interest 
and readily took part in the general 
discussion. 



Y. M. C. A. 

F. R. Kennedy led the meeting on 
Sunday afternoon. His subject was 
"Higher Experiences." In his talk 
the speaker brought out the need for 
such experiences in our daily life. 

If we wish to grow in grace we 
must enjoy those moments of com- 
munion with the creator. Prayer is a 
geat factor in our life. Christ and Paul 
had need of prayer. Three great char- 
acters in christaian history have given 
us the secret of their power. Christ 
prayed. He had to meet his des- 
ciples in the upper chamber, jpart 
from the crowd, in Order to gain 
greater spiritual power. Paul was 
a man of prayer. Thus you see if these 
men had to experience the higher 
things of life, it wo'ild seem neces- 
sary for the College Students to strive 
after the 'higher Experiences" also. 

Mathematical Round Table 

The second monthly meeting cf the 
mathematical Round Table was held 
on Wednesday evening in Professor 
Lehman's recitation room. The at- 
tendance was goodjand the program in- 
tensely interesting. 

R. B. Saylor read a carefully pre" 
pared paper on the metric system. A. 
0. Kauff man demonstrated clearly var- 
ious methods for solving second degree 
equations. Both gentleman had their 
material well in hand and presented 



it in a pleasing way. A lively dis- 
cussion followed. 

Hollow-een Party 

The Philokosmian Literary Society 
gave their annual Hallow-een party 
on Monday evening. The guests as- 
sembled in the assembly room of ihe 
Library from which place they were 
ushered by two masked men to the. 
Kreider house opposite the old mill 
south of town. The house had been 
appropriately decorated with fodder, 
cabbage, pumpkins, leaves and all 
those things which tended to give the 
true old Hallow-een atmosphere to the 
place, to say no hing of apples, cider 
and pumpkins pies, the kind that 
mother used to make. 

Several old fashioned sports such as 
diving for apples, fortune telling etc, 
furnished amusements for all while a 
pianola enlivened the occasion with 
music. After enjoying themselves 
for several hours the guests departed 
well pleased with the evening's enter- 
tainment 

Have Your Printing Done by 

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Lebanon, Pa, 

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PHILADELPHIA 



COLLEGE NEWS 



ALUMNI NOTES 



Continued from page 1 



Miss Etlna D. Yeatts, '09, who is 
teaching in the public schools of 
York, Pa., arrived at Annville, on Sat- 
urday, and is spending several days, 
visiting friends at college. 

Miss Myrtle Garret, '10, of Hum- 
melstown, attended the Hallow-een 
party on Monday evening. 

Miss Alma Light, '99, and Mrs. 
Shroyer, '00, were present at the Hal- 
low'een party on Monday evening. 





Items of Interest 



Miss Daisy Kline, '14, was a visit- 
or in Philadelphia on Saturday and 
while there witnessed k the Penn-India 
foot ball game. 

Samuel Ziegler, '11, was tendered a 
reception by his congregation at Dun- 
cannon. 

Mrs. Brown from Westerly Rhode 
lslnd, is visiting her daughter Miss 
Brown, Prof, of voice, Conservatory. 

Miss Elizabeth Meckley of Hum- 
melstown renewed her acquaintances 
at the college by attending the Hal- 
low-een party. 

R. B. Saylor, 11', is teaching in 
the Lebanon High Schools for some 
time filling a vacancy caused by sick- 
ness. 

Chester E. Rettew, '12, has been 
elected to fill the pulpit at Mt. Etna, 
every Sunday. 

Prof, and Mrs. Derickson were 
visitors in Harrisburg on Friday. 

The staff of the Bizarre, '12, are re- 
puesting the various organizations 
for certain material needed in the prep- 
aration of their annual. This should 
receive the immediate attention of 
the people or organizations addressed. 
Promptness is not only a matter of 
courtesy to the management of the 
Bizarre but will bring better satis- 
faction to the persons or organizations 
concerned. Here is a good chance to 
shew a little christian charity, for 
be assured that the proposition before 
the staff is hard enough without you 
by your carelessness rendering it 
more difficult. 

The Philokosmian Literary Society 
at their regular business sessions Fir- 



day evening elected the following 
officers for the ensuing term. 

President, W. C. Shoop; Vice Pre- 
sident, Guy Wingerd; Critic, 0. T. 
Ehrhart; Chaplain, N. B. S. Thomas; 
Rec. Secretary, Titus. J. Leibold ; 
Cor. Secretary, John E. Sherk; Pian- 
ist, Earl G. Loser; Janitor, I. K. 
Potter; 1st. Ass't. Janitor, L. B. Har- 
nish;2nd. Ass't. Janitor, Lester A. 
Rodes. 

jCebanon Valley 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
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Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoe 8 

Standard Steam Laundry and 
Scouring Works 

A. F. Ward '90 Proprieter 

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Represented at College 

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Commencement Invitations 
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for Annuals 
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WORKS — 17th STREET and LEHIGH 
AVENUE Philadelphia. 

Represented at L. V. C. by 
W. ALBERT BRUNNER 



COIiliEGE flEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume II. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, November 8, 1910 No. 7 



Freshmen Banquet 

SOPHS LOOK ON WHILE "FRESH- 
IES" DEPART FOR PLACE 
OF FESTIVITY 

The class of 1914 of Lebanon Valley 
College held iis first great celebration 
in the form of a banquet at the 
Metropolitan Hotel, Harrisbug, on 
Wednesday evening Nov. 2 with every- 
one of its thiry four members present, 
while the Sophs were chagrined at 
their inabibliy to break np the banquet 
or even to keep some of the ' ' Freshies" 
away. Miss Ella Brightbill ssas the 
chaperon of the party. 

The Sophs were wise, and it was only 
after a great deal of manoevering 
that the whole class reached Harris- 
burg and were safely housed at the 
''Met." 

The hanquet had long been arranged 
for and it was hara to keep thirty- 
four tongues quiet; as a result the 
Sophs got information of the affair 
and they determined to prevent some 
of the Freshmen from attending. 

When Tuesday evening came and 
night had fallen, the "Freshies" 
suddenly disappeared. Some went to 
Palmyra and Hershey. from whence 
they were to go to Hanieburg on 
the following morning The Sophs 
shadowed them but failed to cap- 
ture anyone. Next morning the Sophs 
arrived at Lebanon to I old up any 
"Freshies" that might be found in 
the city and eight strong, located 
three of them at one of the city's 
hotels. The Freshmen called on the 
renowned Lebanon police to escort them 
to the P. & R. station and see them 
safely off. The Sophs boarded the 
same train and at Annville received 
another reinforcement but at Palmyra 
they gave up their plans and left the 
train. The remaining Freshmen were 

(Continued. On page 2) 



Calendar. 

Tuesday evening— 6:00 p. m. Stud- 
ents Prayer meeting. 

Thursday— 7 :45 p. m. Oratory Re- 
cital. 

Friday afternoon, foot ball, Mt. 
Sc. Mark's vs. L V. at Emmitsburg. 
7 :15 p. m. Societies. 



Ministerial Association 

FIELD SECRETARY OF COLLEGE 
MAKES SPLENDID ADDRESS 

The regular semi-monthly meet- 
ing of the College Ministerial Associ- 
ation was held last Wednesday even- 
ing at the home of W. C. Shoop, '11, 
on College Avenue. A large num- 
ber of members attended and enjoyed 
one of the best meetings of the year. 
After the regular business was trans- 
acted, Rev. D. E. Long, Field Secre- 
tary of the College made a splendid 
address and conducted a conference 
on "The Present Ministry." He 
said in part, "Preparation for the 
Ministry should be made along three 
distinct lines, spiritually, physically, 
and intellectually. The ministers of 
our church should be trained in our 
own colleges and seminary, for men 
with such a training are given the 
preference. In service the minister 
must be extremely practical ; the rer- 
mons, clear, plain and brief. Socially 
and spiritually the minister's life must 
be unselfishly lived for others." 

The next meeting will be held Nov. 
17, at the home of Charles White, 
'12, on Maple strreet. 



"In England," says Dr. A. H. 
Fairchild of Missouri University, "ona 
student in five takesjpart in some form 
of athletics, while in America, statis- 
tics show only one in fifty taking part 
in active college sports." 



Touches 

PRESIDENT KEISTER POINTS 
OU f COLLEGE IDEALS 

College life has been called ideal. 
It flourishes in a little world of its 
own with all the conditions for ex- 
cellence of character and scholarship, 
the best teachers and also best stu- 
dents who are interested and absorbed 
by their work, the great themes of 
thought that belong to the higher 
levels of life, and unknown for bidding 
each one to prepare for it. 

Whv should not college life be 
ideal? Ideal in its aims, in its con- 
ditions, in its products? 

Its proper product is personality 
of the best type. Scholarship shines 
in personality but it is secondary. 
The man is more than the student for 
the student becomes the man. The man 
is the greater and must be scholarly 
and moral and social and religious, 
in order to be his best. 

Personality shows in little acts like 
laughter, be it coarse or refined, open 
or restrained. It shows in our table 
manners,- by has'e or appropriate delib- 
eration. It is said the American peo- 
ple are a race of train-catchers. 
But the student should rise above his 
race and be duly deliberate at the din- 
ing hall. Life is made up of little 
things even in the ideal world of the 
college. Personality is marred by dog- 
ears of carelessness which shows more 
plainly where personality is the pro- 
per product of the forces there active. 

Shall we lose sight of these little 
things, these touches that tell of the 
man, his scholarship, his essential re- 
finement, his ideal nature responding 
rightly to ideal conditions? 

"The mind has a thousand eyes, 

And the heart but one; 
Yet the light of a whole life dies 

When its love is gone." 



I 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College |4erjus 

Issued weekly during- the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

P. K. KOONTZ, '11 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. A. BRUNNER, '11 

E. A. SPESSARD, '11 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
W. O. ELLIS, '11 

F. R. KENNEDY, '12 
CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, '12 

HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
S. O. GRIMM, '12 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
W. A. Brunner, '11, 
ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 

OLIVER BUTTERWICK '12 
PAUL LOSER, '13 

Subscription Price SI. 00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of leu, 75 els. 

Address all business communications 
to W. A. Brunner, Box 916, all other 
matter to Room 19, Administration 
Building Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pa. 

Editorial 

A student body is a most unique 
and peculiar mass of persons and must 
be treated and governed according to 
the standard of principles of student- 
life in general as exemplified in the 
particular nation in which it exists. 

As we recognize certain peculiar 
traits that are nalive to country-folk, 
city-folk or any class of persons who 
have their own peculiar environments 
and are isolated to a certain degree 
from other classes, so must we admit 
that in the more particular sense such 
conditions of etiquette, law and de- 
sires do also necessarily present them- 
selves. In words that will suit our 
purpose better, a student who has any 
sense whatever of his powers and pur- 
poses cannot be expected to ect as an 
archbishop or a pope would under the 
same circumstances. And yet, if he 
Joes not, immediately upon donning his 
verdancy, manifest some remark- 
able extend of inherent piety and 
saintliness, he is branded as a rebel 
and a degenerate fool. 

If we compare conditions at home 
and at college we will not need to use 
;much brain matter to discriminate the 
jfference. Every student loves the 
warmth and good cheer of his home 
fire-sjde, and the affectionate ties form- 



ed there are only bound closer 
about his own heart when he feels the 
first wild and romantic impulses of 
college-life. Gradually he sees life 
from another piont of view. His de- 
sires begin to change. The monotony 
of his life seeks digression and amuse- 
ment which must necessarily be new. 

If nothing presents itself f or his 
entertainment, he immediately creates 
something. Thus, he begins to think 
and act for himself and should we down 
him at; once, if he sometimes goes 
wrong? 

At college the man first learns that 
he is expected to be a leader among 
men. Now it is that he is aware 
that college stujents ard college 
professors are not gods. The 
psychological disturbances that then 
sway him back and forth need not be 
recounted here. We have all ex- 
perienced them. Suffice it to say 
that the student is no morn an ape but 
a self-thinking, self-willed and par- 
tially intelligent creature. That^'was 
just the aim in bringing him within 
the classic halls of wisdom. Now 
since a man has once reached such a 
degree of enlightenment what else 
are we to suppose than as a necessary 
concomitant he will sometimes clash 
with authority. 

But in clashing we must remember 
that there are two sides. We have 
thought of but one here. Authority 
may also have evolutionary 
experiences and when such is the case 
it is best for both student-body and 
authority to clearly understand each 
ether. Each should welcome reason. 
Deliberation nourishes kidnness ; 
obstinacy creates disgust and treason. 

Whatever may be the grievances of 
authority or student-body at Lebanon 
Valley, let neither act stubbornly and 
imagine itself the only righteous one 
in existence. There are others. 



On Tuesday evening, Mr. Earle A. 
Spessard, '11, addressed the student 
body at Albright College on the sub- 
ject of Wcrk among Foreigners. The 
Y. M. C. A. of that institution 
contemplates doing work similar to 
that done by our association, and Mr. 
Spessard outlined the nature and 
emphasized the importance of the 
work. 



Freshmen Banquet 

(Continued from page 1) 

picked up at various stations along 
the line. 

At Harrisburg they were met 
by Detective White and Ziel of 
the Harrisburg police who had been 
summoned as an escouit by an advance 
telegram from Reporter Harnish. 

During the afternoon the Freshman 
dispersed throughout the city. The 
Sophs were on the job and captured 
Lyter and Ulrich on the Mulberry 
Street Bridge. When Ulrich promis- 
ed that he would not attend the Iian- 
puet he was released. Lyter was 
taken to a house at Progress. When 
the Freshmen appeared on the scene, 
the Sophs decided to remove their 
captive to Hummelstown. Upon 
arriving there the car-crew refused 
to let them remove him from the car 
and he returned to Harrisburg a 8 :00 in 
time for the banquet. Meanwhile 
the "Freshies" had recaptured 
Ulrich and compelled him to goback 
with them; every precaution was taken 
to prevent any troouble. 

The banqueting room was delight- 
fully decoratd in granite and brown, 
the class colors. Fiom8:0i) to 12:^0 
the banquet was on. A splendid menu 
was served. At the call of the 
toastmaster, Paul Hummel, toasts 
were given: "1914," Walter Biever ; 
"Our Girls," Lester A. Redes; The 
"Sophs," Henry Kreider; "Our 
Boys," Blanche Risser; "Alma 
Mater," Henry Snavely. 

The party whi^h returned on Thurs- 
day morning in time for chanel, 
consisted of the following : Misses Ella 
Brightbill, chaperon, Mae Meyer, 
Catherine A. Bachman, Josephii e 
Urich, Blanche Risser, Daisy Kline, 
Edith Morrison, Messrs. Henry Krei- 
der, David Gruber, Ellis Zimmerman, 
Paul Hummel, Leroy Harnish. Arthur 
Light, Edward Landis, John Shirk, 
Walter Biever, Henry Snavely, Paul 
Strickler, Allen Walters, CarlSchmidt, 
Claude Reddick, Harry Charlton, 
Charles Arndt, Mark Holtzman, W. 
H. Hays, John Lyter, Lester Rodes, 
GeorgR Zullinger, Russel Weidler, 
Harry Ulrich, William Stager, David 
Young, Edward Mutch, John Curry. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



CLIONIAN 
P'ano Solo, Vera Myers; Current 
Events, Larene Engle; Why should 
a woman vote? Helen Brightbill; 
vocal solo, Myrle Turby ; Why should 
•women not vote? Bertha Spessard ; 
Piano solo, Ora Bachman ; Reading, 
Kathryn Clauser; 1914 Banquet, 
Blanche Risser; Piano solo, Mae 
Meyer. 

PHILOKOSMIAN 
Athletics at 'L. V. C, Edward 
Smith ; The value of a moustache, 
C. F. Harnish ; Debate: Resolved, 
That the ministerial Association is 
more beneficial to new students than 
the^Death League, Affirmative, Guy 
Wingerd, W. A. Brunner; Negative, 
Oliver Butterwick, 0. T. Ehrhart ; 
Vocal solo, E. A. Spessard; Our 
faculty, Ivan Potter. 

KALOZETEAN 
Original Story, Arthur Light; 
Current Events, Robert Light ; Chorus, 
Society; The results of the election, 
H. E. Snavely; Essay, F. L. Frost; 
Chorus, Society; Freshman Banquet, 
W. W. Stager; Piano solo, J. F. 
Reed. 



A Good-by 



By Arthur L. Phelps 

Good-by. old boy, good-by. 

Seem3 hard, somehow, to say the 
word that means 
The thing we do. 
Good-by, olH boy, good-by, 

I hope the future will be good 
to you. 

Good-by, old boy, good-by. 

Let's smile a little, while your big 
hand grips 
Tight into mine. 
Good-by, old boy, good-by. 

Climb on ; the train is moving down 
the line. 

Good-by, old boy, good-by 

We've had good days to&ether, just 
we two, 
Since first we met. 
Good-by, old by, good-by, 

We'll say the words, but we will not 
forget. 

McC lures 



Items of Interest 



W. A. Brunner, '11, is spending 
a week at his home at New Bloom- 
field, Perry County. 

A. 0. Kauffman, '11, left for his 
horr. e at Dallastown on Monday, in 
order to be home to vote Tuesday. 

Misses Catharine Wolfe of Camp 
Hill, Pa., and Edna Honich of West 
Fairview, Pa., visited friends at the 
college on Saturday. 

P. R. Koontz, '11, spent Saturday 
and Sunday at. his home at West 
Fairview. 

Miss Clara Horn, '13, made her 
first visit to her new home at Enola 
over Sunday. 

Rev. W. C. Shoop, "11, opened 
revival at Ebenezer, on Sunday even- 
ing. 

Mrs. Ely, of Hagerstown, Md., spent 
a few days with her daughter at Leb- 
anon Valley. 

A number of students took ad- 
vantage of the free transportation to 
Lebanon Saturday night and attended 
the Republican mass meeting. 

Edward Mutch, 'U, atttended 
services at the Salem U. B. Church, 
Lebanon on Sunday. 

Miss Helen Brightbill was in 
Harrisburg on Saturday. 

Mrs. Wm. Smith, accompanied by 
her son Allen, was a guest of her 
daughter, Miss Grace Smith, over 
Saturday and Sunday. 

Edward Marshall, '11, and Paul 
Loser, '13, were gunning on 
Saturday. They succeded in getting 
but one "cottontail." 

P. E. Gibble preached at Green 
Point on Sunday. 

Richie, '13, Heffelfinger, '13, and 
Hayes, '14, played for the Annville 
foot ball team at Hershey on Saturday. 
The town team succeded in holding the 
Hershey Y. M. C. A. to eleven 
points. 

The Freshman foot ball team played 
the varsity on Monday evening. 

Rev. George McDonald of Seattle 
Washington, addressed the students 
on Tuesday morning. 



Rev. G. F. McDonald, of Seattl e 
Washington, addressed the local U. 
B. Sunday School on Sunday, it being 
rally day. Rev. McDonald is east in 
the interests of home missions on the 
Pacifiic Coast. 



Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. 

Mr. N. B. S. Thomas led the meet- 
ing on Sunday afternoon,. This sub- 
ject was taken from James 4 :14. — 
"For what is your Life." 

In an interesting way he brought 
out the various conceptions of life. 
He used many illustrations from life 
and history to show different kinds of 
life. 

Emphasing the thought that we can 
go so far in our pleasures in lif^, and if 
we go farther we may come to grief. 
The leader showed that if we cannot 
be as great as Paul and Peter we can 
do our share in making life what it 
is. An interesting discussion fol- 
lowed. 

Have Your Printing Done by 

TheJournal PublishingCo. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 
When You Want THE BETTER GRADE 

Frederick W. Light 

826 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa, 

Representing 
Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Co. 
Of Milwaukee, Wis. 



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PHILADELPHIA 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Alumni 



M. F. Lehman, '07, has accepted 
an instructorship in Lafayette Col- 
lege. Hi3 subject is mathematics. 

Miss Nellie Butrington, '00, visited 
this vicinitty with her two brothers 
George and Lewis. Mr. Lewis Buffing- 
ton was a former student at Lebanon- 
Valley. 

F E. Shaffer, 10, at present a 
student in the Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, who returned to his home to 
vote, circulated among friends at the 
college on Monday. 

Mrs. H. E. Enders, '01, and her two 
children, after spending several months 
at the home of her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Israel Mover in Derry Church, 
left on Tuesday for her home in 
Lafayette, Ind. 



In Answer to the Little French 
Clock 

A very pretty home wedding was 
solemnized at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. John A. Beam, at Intercourse, 
Lancaster county, on Tuesday evening 
at 6 :45 o'clock, when their duaghter, 
Ruth Ella, was united in marriage to 
Park Fijroer Esbenshade, of Bird-in- 
Hand, by Rev. William Beach, of 
Union Depoit, Dauphin county. The 
bride wore a gown of chiffon over 
white silk, trimmed with Persian 
braid, and carried chrysanthemum?. 
The bridegroom wore the conventional 
evening dress. The beautiful ring 
ceremony of the United Brethren 
Church was used. The couple was 
unattended, and only the immediate 
families were present. Following the 
wedding breakfast the couple went to 
Lancaster by automobile and took a 
late train for New York. 

The bride attended Lebanon Valley 
Conservatory for several years. 

Mr. Esbenshade graduated with the 
class of 1907. 

We wish them well. 

Senior-Junior Council 

Owing to the fact that the council 
has not been permitted to do its work 
fairly and honestly, the members 
handed in their resignations to their 
respective classes. They were ac- 
cepted and no council now exists. 



Lines to Kate 

Communi -Kate's intelligent, 

Intri-Kate's obscure; 
Prevari-Kate is stubborn, 

And Equivo-Kate unsure. 

Dislo-Kate is painful, 

Alter-Kate's a pest ; 
Rusti-Kate is charming — 

But Edu-Kate's the best. 

—Chicago News. 

jCebanon T/allej/ 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 
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jfnnville, tPa. 

Kodaks, Cameras 
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Printing and Developing for Amateurs 

HARPEL'S ART STORE 

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Learn Wireless & R. R. Telegraphy 

Shortage of fully 10.000 Operators on account of 
8-hour law and extensive "wireless'' develop- 
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Telegraph Officials and positively place all stu- 
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Na4M Telegraph institute 

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Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 

Standard Steam Laundry and 
Scouring Works 

A. F. Ward '90 Proprieter 

27 N. Seventh St. Lebanon Pa. 

Represented at College 

CFull line of College Post Cards, 
Writing Papers, Envelopes, Tablets. 
Pens, Pencils, Ink, Pictures, Pen 
nants, Box Paper, Photopaste. Also Eyes 
Examined and Glasses Fitted. 

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Commencement Invitations 
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Represented at L. V. C. by 
W, ALBERT BRUNNER 



COIiliEGE flEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume II. Hnnvilte, Pa., Tuesday, flovember 15, 1910 Jio. 8 



"Mountainers" 

Outplay L. V. 

ROLL UP LARGE SCORE OF 
62-0 IN UNINTERESTING 
GAME 

Last Friday Lebanon Valley football 
team was defeated by the highest 
score of the year. The quarters were 
twelve minutes, but by mutual 
consent the final quarter was cut to 
eight minutes. The first half ended 
with the score 35—0, while the third 
quarter was almost - as disastrous as 
the first two. The forward pass and 
punting were responsible for many 
gains. Flanigan and McGuire made 
goods gains for the " Mountaineers. " 

In the final quarter our team played 
good football, holding Mt. St. Mary's 
for downs. Hayes and Forrest made 
many fine tackles, while Captain 
Lehman's punting gave us good gains. 

Biever frequently broke through 
the opponent's line, which resulted in 
tackling the man carrying the ball. 
Charlton did good work considering 
his recent injury. The combination 
was strong against us, playing on a 
strange field, and having to stand for 
some lime in the cold wind before the 
game. 

The game was marked by much 
holding by the "Mountaineers. " This, 
however, is no excuse, for we were 
outplayed, outwinded and outweighed, 
and they deserve credit for their 
victory. 

A flurry of snow interfered slightly 
during the last quarter. Considering 
the previous training of our boys, 
they did good work and had the fight- 
ing spirit to the end. 

The lineup : 
L. V. Positions Mt. St. Mary's 
Hayes 1. e. Miloy 

Loser (Chariton) 1. t. Leonard 



Kennedy 1. g. Ruddy 

Harnish c Waynard (Sullivan) 

Biever r. g. Sullivan (Rice) 

Hensel (Plummer) r. t. Fagan 
Kreider r. e. Engel (Burke) 

Forrest q. b. Mooney 

Marshall (Frost) 1. h. b. Barry 
E. Loser r. h. b. McGuire 

Capt. Lehman f.b. Flanigan 



Biological Field Club 

The regular monthly program of 
the Biological Field Club was rendered 
in the Biological lecture room on 
Wednesday evening. The following 
constituted the program:— 

Miss Edna Yarkers, '13, read a 
well prepared and interesting paper 
on common cabbage insects. 

Ivan L. Ressler. '12. reported to 
the club a list and description of the 
poisonous plants found in this 
vicintiy. 

Prof. J. H. Derickson gave to the 
members a very instructive talk on the 
minx. The talk was replete with an 
account, description, habitat and 
characteristics of that animal. 

Samuel G. Ziegler, '11, read a 
splendid production on the Development 
of Sex Habits in plants. 

These programs rendered monthly 
are very instructive and all those 
interested in the Biological sciences 
would be amply repaid by attending 
them regularly. 



Cilo-Kalo Joint Session 

Piano Duett, Paul Strickler, Sara 
Strickler; Pres. Address, W. 0. Ellis; 
Sketch, J. W. Ischey, Kathryn Klaus- 
er ; Quartette, Edith Gingrich, Ora 
Bachman, F. L. Frost, Warren Hayes; 
Original Story, Chester Rettew ; Parody 
Sara Zimmerman; Baritone Solo, 
Harry Bender; Book Review, D. C. 
Keister; Olive Branch, Examiner, 
Editors; Piano Solo, Katie Gingrich. 



Calendar. 

Tuesday, Nov. 15— Students' prayer 
meeting, 6 p.m. 

Thursday, Nov. 17—6 p. m. Minis- 
terial Association at the home of 
Charles White on Maple street. 

Friday, Nov. 18-7:30 p. m. Clio- 
Kalo joint session, Kalo Hall. 

Saturday, 19,— Football.. Lebanon 
Valley \s. Delaware at Newark. 

Sunday, Nov. 20, 1 p. m. Christian 
Associations. 

Monday Nov. 21— 7:45 p. m. Star 
Course, "Music Makers." 

" The Music Makers " 

"No Tiresome Wait, " no offense 
to lovers of music, but perfect enjoy- 
ment is assured anyone who shall 
attend the entertainment which will be 
given in the hall of Engle Conservatory 
of Music Annvilie, Pa., Monday No- 
vember 21, 1910, under the auspices of 
the Christian Associations of Lebanon 
Valley College. Box office open Fri- 
day, Saturday and Monday, 12:30 to 1 
p. m. and 6 to 7 p. m . Single 
admission, 35 cents. Reserved seats, 10 
cents extra. 




The Burd school, Philadelphia, of 
which Miss Ora M. Harnish, '06, is 
superintendent, celebrated Founders' 
Day last week. It will be remembered 
that Miss Harnish, who has had such 
phenomenal success in this position, 
visited her broiher, C. F. Harnish, 
•'12, some time ago. 

Roy J. Guyer, '08, of Shippensburg, 
Pa., who is secretary in the Marshall- 
town, Iowa, Y. M. C. A., was elected 
superintendent of the Sunday School 
of that place. 

(Continued on pa^e 3) 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fieuus 

Issued weekly during- the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

P. R. KOONTZ, '11 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. A. BRUNNER, '11 
E. A. SPESSARD, '11 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

W. O. ELLIS, '11 
P. R. KENNEDY, '12 
CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, ' 12 
HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
S. O. GRIMM, '12 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
W. A. Brunner, '11, 
ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 

OLIVER BUTTERWICK '12 
PAUL LOSER, '13 



Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 



Address all business communications 
to W. A. Brunner, Box 916, all other 
matter to Room 19, Administration 
Building Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pa. 

Editorial 

There are many phases to <he 
practical side of College life. The 
new student finds himself in a world 
altogether different from his home 
surroundings. He makes many new 
friends, comes into different social and 
spiritual atmospheres, and almost 
begins life anew. 

In this new position, the Christian 
Association takes ample care of his 
spiritual welfare, trying to better him 
by his presence and participation in 
the meetings. But there is another 
side which needs more development 
than will be recieved through the daily 
contact with the professors and fellow- 
students. This is along the line of 
Literary Societies. The student of 
every class should receive much inform- 
ation of value in the class-room, but 
what will be the ultimate profit if all 
ia retainded and no attempt is made to 
help one's fellow 7 Nowhere is greater 
freedom acquired than in the Literary 
Society. Nor should interest lag in 
this direction, for the training received 
in the society hall is invaluable for 
the experiences of after life. We 
would not attempt to give advice on 
choosing which society to join. That 
is not our buisness, as each one must 
decide for himself. It is, however, 



essential to success in college that each 
student have a society to call his very 
own, which he can love, honor and 
uplift in compensation for the good he 
receives therefrom. 

Everybody will agree we learn from 
each other. Then every meeting we 
miss we lose something of value. 
The highest possible attendance should 
be demanded, from the view point of 
interest, encouragement to the per- 
formers, and the good of the society. 
Above all, let every student be strong 
and make a stand for some Literary 
Society. 



Much is being said in reference to 
the ideal and the method of obtaining 
it. Nearly everybody has his own 
method of reaching the ideal which is 
uppermost in his mind. However, 
very often this method is little, if any, 
more than a theory. Too often we 
do not reckon the cost of our enterprise. 
We forget to take facts and existing 
conditions into r our account. Without 
these our theory will never become 
practice, our ideal will never become 
real. Every phase of our theory must 
be thoroughly weighed and brought 
upon a plain business basis before it 
can stand the most practical tests ; 
likewise our ideals. In aspiring 
toward this ideal let each one weigh 
his plan3 carefulh and count the coat 
accurately before he acts. Then will 
character be broadened, and personality 
strengthened; then indeed will the 
student "rise above his race" and 
obtain the long-sought goal. 



Educational Day 

Sunday, November 20th, will be 
Educational day at St. Paul's U. B. 
Church, West Lebanon, of which Mark 
G. Holtzman is pastor. The Sunday 
School will rally to this interest at 
9:30 o'clock, a. m., and at 10:30 
President Lawrence Keister will 
preach. At 2 p. m. there will be a 
platform service, to be addressed bv 
W. Albert Brunner, '11, Victor D. 
Mulhollen, '13, and Rev. W. H. 
Peiffer The evening service will be 
addressed by Professors E. M. Bals- 
baugh, '01, and Ray G. Light, '06, 
who are graduates of the college. 
Ihe male quartet of the church will 
sing. 



Y. M. C. A. 

A large number of fellows 
turned out to Y. M. C. A. on Sunday 
and enjoyed one of the best meetings 
of the year. Guy Wingerd, '12, the 
leader, discussed "Imitators of 
Christ," using as a lesson the second 
chapter of II Timothy. He said in 
part "True Imitators of Christ are 
those who mould their characters 
after Him, and who are slow to 
judge the character of others. Christ 
wants us to recognize Him and do our 
utmost in bringing the world to Him. 
We can take part in imitating Christ 
by living as he did, and inducing others 
to do their part in bringing abont the 
coming kingdom. A lively discussion 
followed in which Messrs. Brunnner, 
Koontz, L. Spessard, and Leibold 
participated. Rev. H. B . Spayd, the 
c allege pastor was present and made 
the closing prayer. 



First Senior Oratory Recital 

Mr. J. W. Ischy was the first member 
of the senior class in oratory to give 
his recital. Last Thursday evening he 
read cuttings from "Seven Oaks" in a 
way alike creditable to himself and his 
department. He was ably assisted by 
Misses McCurdy, Snyder, and Clauser, 
who rendered a number of short 
readings. A fine audience was present, 
which goes to show the public interest 
in the Oratory department. The next 
Senior recital will be given some 
time in February. 



Y. W. C. A. 

The meeting on [Sunday afternoon 
coducted by Miss Verda Snyder, was 
one of the most interesting held this 
year. Ihe topic for discussion was 
' ' My favorite passage of Scripture, and 
why I like it." The leader pointed 
out the difficulties of making a selec- 
tion among so many beautiful pas- 
sages. She quoted several that 
appealed to her very strikingly and 
asked l^e girls to do the same. 
Nearly everybody responded with a 
readiness that gave life and spirit to 
the meeting. 



"Thought is another name for fate, 
Chose, then, thy destiny, and wait— 
For love brings love, and hate 
brings hate. '' 

-Ella Wheeler Wilccx. 








COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



PHILOKOSMIAN 
Current Events, Ralph Riegle; 
Developments as L. V. C, S. G. 
Ziegler; Debate: Resolved, That 
student government at L. V. C. has 
outgrown its usefulness. Affirmative, 
Clarence Ulrich and E. H. Carmany ; 
negative, W. Becker and F. Hensel ; 
piano solo, E. K. Boughter; The 
Preparatory Faculty, Robert Hartz. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



Continued from page 1 



Rev. Raymond P. Daugherty, '97, 
conducted the services in the local 
church on Nov. 8. 

John R. Guyer, '98, of Middletown, 
has formed a law partnership with 
Hon. John E. Fox, of Harrisburg. 

N. C. Schlichter, '97, a former 
member of the college faculty, is the 
author of an article, "Random Notes 
on Reading," in last week's "Watch- 
word." 

Rev. S. E. Rupp, and Rev. H. E. 
Miller, both of Lebanon, were college 
visitors on Saturday. 

Miss Arabella Batdorf, a graduate 
of the conservatory, entertained the 
"Auf Wieder Sehn" Club at her home 
on Saturday afternoon, at which time 
she announced her engagement to Mr. 
Ellwood Iv ins Boyd, a young business 
man of Oak Lane. Both are very 
widely known. Congratulations. 



Re-elected to House 

Hon. Marlin E. Olmsted LL.D., a 
member of the board of trustees of 
the college, was re-elected to congress 
by a very flattering vote which was in 
no way affected by the Democratic tidal 
wave. Mr. Olmsted is one of the 
most influential men in the United 
States House of Representatives. The 
NEWS congratulates him on his 
triumphant victory and on his entrance 
into an even larger field for Congres- 
sional usefulness. 



"Let every "man be occupied, and 
occupied in the highest employment of 
which his nature is capable, and die 
with the consciousness that he has done 
his best. "-Sidney Smith. 



Items of Interest 

Prof. Sleichter and Miss Rhoda 
Brandt spent Friday at Harrisburg and 
Saturday at Hummelstown. 

Edna Kilmer, '13, spent Sunday 
at her home at Reading Pa. 

Maude Kerchner spent Sunday at 
her home at Shoemakersville. 

Carrie Light, '12, spent Sunday at 
her home at Jonestown. 

Prof. H. H. Shenk went to Allentown 
Sunday and spoke in the Linden St. 
U. B. Church. 

Titus Leibold, '12, oreached at 
Cleona on Sunday morning. 

W. A. Brunner, '11, returned on 
Thursday last from a trip to his home 
in Perry County. 

Rev. E. 0. Burtner wes in town on 
Saturday last. 

The Western Union Telegraph Com- 
pany has installed a telephone in 
reporter Harnish's room. 

"Hezekiah's Country Store" was 
presented on Saturday evening in the 
Engle Conservatory of Music for the 
benefit of the Washington Cornet 
Band. 

S. G. Ziegler, '11, has been elected 
to preach the annual Thanksgiving 
sermon at the union service in the 
Presbyterian church at Duncannon, 
Pa. 

The NEWS extends its deepest 
sympathy to Oliver Butterwick, '12, 
and Miss Myile Turby, both of whom 
lost a sister by death within a 
week. 

Prof, and Mrs. Shenk entertained 
the memers of the faculty at their 
home, East Main Street on Saturday 
evening. November 5. 

Those present : President and Mrs. 
Keister, Prof, and Mrs. Derick- 
son. Prof, and Mrs. Lehman, Prof, 
and Mrs. Shroyer , Mis3 Dodge, Miss 
Parks, Mrs. Brown, Miss Brown. Prof, 
and Mrs. Spessard. and Miss Boehm. 

Prof. Wanner spent Saturday on a 
gunning trip to Mt. Gretna. He got 
two shcts, but sold the rabbits on the 
way home. 

Sedic S. Rine, who was compelled 



to go home some time ago on account 
of an attack of inflammatory rheuma- 
tism, returned to school Monday even- 
ing, fully recovered. 

S. G. Ziegler, '11, was called to 
Duncannon on Tuesday to officiate at 
the funeral of one of his members. 

Prof. Shenk will address the local 
institute in South Lebanon township. 

Samuel Plummer. '12, is spending 
several days at his home near Hagers- 
town, Md. 

Guy Wingerd, '12, made a business 
trip to Harrisburg on Saturday. 



"Some people bear three kinds of 
trouble— -all they ever had, all thev 
have now, and all they expect to 
have, "—Edward Everett Hale. 

Have Your Printing Done by 

The Journal Publishing Co. 

AN NVILLE, PA. 
When You Want THE BETTER GRADE 

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826 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Representing 
Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Co. 
Of Milwaukee, Wis. 

CHRIST Y- "NIFTY" 
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PHILADELPHIA 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Off For California 

Rev. J. A. Eby and family left 
Annville for their new home at 1308 
South Hope St., Los Angeles Cal., 
this .'Tuesday) morning. While the 
NEWS regrets very much to see these 
people depart it extends its best wishes 
for their success in their new field. 

Miss Maybelle Adams of Ashburn, 
Mass., who succeeds Mrs. Eby as 
Director of the Oratory Department, 
will arrive Thursday to take charge 
of the work. 

Miss Adams is a graduate of Emerson 
School of Oratory and a classmate 
of Mrs. Eby. 



The Wife 



By Paul Kester 
She built a temple 
In her dream of love, 
And bowed before 
The shrine 
Of her idolatry. 
The temple faded 
To a human home, 
The shrine 
Became a cradle 
That she rocked, 
And all her love 
The holier duties 
Of a common life. 

"Boys flying kites haul in their 

white-winged birds; 
You can't do that when you are 

flying words. 
Careful with fire is good advice we 

know, 

Careful with words is ten times 
doubly so. 
Thoughts unexpressed may some 
times fall back dead, 
But God Himself can't kill them 
when they're said." 

—Selected. 

God has delivered yourself to your 
care and says: "I had no fitter to 
trust than you. "— Epiccetus. 



Nothing reveals a man's character 
more fully than the spirit in which 
he bears his limitations.— Mabie. 



Doing nothing for others is the 
undoing of ourselves.— Horace Mann. 



On God's dial-pat^ of time 
'Tis never late to him who stands 
Self-centered in a trust sublime, 
With mastered force and thinking 
hands.— Savage. 



wh ! spuaro thyself for use ; a stone 

that may ; 
Fit in the wall is not left in the way. 

— Trench. 

oCebanon l/alley 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 
ffiev, jCawrence Jfeister, !Pres. 
Jinnville, !Pa. 

Kodaks, Cameras 
and Supplies 

Printing and Developing for Amateurs 

HARPEL'S ART STORE 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Learn Wireless & R. R. Telegraphy 

Shortage of fully 10,000 Operators on account of 
8-hour law and extensive "wireless'' develop- 
ments. We operate under direct supervision on 
Telegraph Officials and positively place all stu- 
dents, when qualified. Write for catalogue. 

Nat'! Telegraph Institute 

Cincinnati, Philadelphia. Memphis, Davenport 
la., Columbia, S. ('., Portland, Ore. 



If you want Good 

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Try the 

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Company Buffalo, N. Y. 



When the outlook is not good try 
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IF YOU 



A. G. Spalding & Bro. 

1120 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

You are correct if you get your 

LADIES 1 and CENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS 1 , Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 

Standard Steam Laundry and 
Scouring Works 

A. F. Ward '90 Proprieter 

27 N. Seventh St. Lebanon Pa. 

Represented at College 

CFull line of College Post Cards, 
Writing Papers, Envelopes, Tablets. 
Pens, Pencils, Ink, Pictures, Pen 
nants, Box Paper, Photopaste. Also Eyes 
Examined and Glasses Fitted. 

D. B. SHIFFER 
WEST MAIN STREET ANNVILLE, PA 

The CHAS. H. ELLIOTT 
COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in 
the World 

Commencement Invitations 
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AVENUE Philadelphia. 

Represented at L. V. C. by 
W. ALBERT BRUNNER 



COLLEGE flEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume II. 



flnnville, Pa., Tuesday, flovembe* 22, 1910 



fio. 9 



Matters Historical 

EARLY HISTORY OF THE COL- 
LEGE IN THE LIGHT OF THE 
CONTEMPORARY PRESS 

The following interesting ar- 
ticle ha? been taken from capers 
which the late B. Benjamin Bierman 
had collected. and>hich were presented 
to the college library by Mrs. Bierman. 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ANNVILLE, PA. 
This college, which is maintained 
under the auspices of the United 
Brethren church, was chartered in 
April 1867. Although only one 3 ear 
old it is in a flourishing condition. Its 
first annual commencemet, which was 
held about a week since was a very 
interesting affair to the members of 
the United Brethren church. Ten ora- 
tions were delivered. The valedictory 
being pronounced by William B. 
Bodenhorn of Lebanon Pa. The faculty 
of the college is composed of the foll- 
owing named professors : Rev T R 
Vickory, A. M. President, and Profess- 
or of Mental and MoralSciences ; Lucian 
H. Hammond, A. M.. Professor of An- 
cient Languages and Literature: John 
S. Krumbine, Professor of Mathe- 
matics: E. Benj. Bierman, A. M 
Professor of English Language and 
Literature; Miss Ellen F. Walker, A. 
»■ music and drawing; John Wesley 
Ltter, teacher of Bookeeping, etc. Miss 
Lizzie M.Rigler, Ornamental Branch- 
es; Mrs. E. S. Vickroy. Preceptress. 
-From Semi-Weekly Tribune. New 
*ork, Tuesday, July 7, 1868. 

^wTcTaT 

In order to stimulate greater interest 
in the Y. W. C. A., the Devotional 
Committee has arranged a series of 
meetings in which a book is read and 
discussed. 

The first of these meetings, held on 
Sunday afternoon, proved to ba very 



interesting. Edith M. Lehman lead 
the meeting. She read one of Ralph 
Connor's books, "Give" which is taken 
from "The Sky Pilot." The scene is 
laid in the west in the foothill country 
of the Rocky Mountains. The theme 
of the story is the "Why of Human 
Pain." This subject will be taken 
up as the topic for the next meeting 
to be lead by Miss Kilmer, after 
Thanksgiving. We would urge all the 
girls to attend these meetings. 

Sundown 

A late lark twitters from the quiet 
skies 
And from the west, 
Where the sun, his day's work ended 
Lingers as in content. 
There fall on the old. gray city, 
An influence luminous and serene 
A shining peace. 

The smoke ascends 

In a rosy, and, golden haze. 

The spires 
Shine and are changed. In the 

valley 

Shadows rise. The lark sings on. 

The sun 
Closing his benedictions 
Sinks, and the darkening air 
Thrills with a sense of triumphing 
night, 

Night with her train of stars 
And her great gift of sleep. 

So be my passing! 

My task accomplished and the long 
Day done 

My wages taken and in my heart 

Some Jate lark singing, 

Let me be gathered to the quiet west, 

Ihe sun down splendid and serene, 
Death 

—William Earnest Henely 



Calendar. 

Tuesday, Nov. 22-6 p. m. Prayer 
Meeting. 

Thursday Nov. 24—12 :30 p. m . 
Annual Thanksgiving Dinner. 7:45 p. 
m. Clio Anniversary Exercises. 

Thursday Nov. 24 to Monday Nov. 
28 Thanksgiving Recess. 

Freshman Party 

The boys of the freshman class were 
delightfully entertained on ;Wednesday 
evening by the girls of 1914 and the 
class chaperon, Miss Ella Brightbill,at 
the later's home on CoHege Avenue, 
Miss Boehm and Miss Balliette were 
invited guests . 

All those present enjoyed themselves 
immensely^and among.'the pleasantries 
of the evening were various games, 
music, and dainty refreshments, which 
the hostess had well selected. Every* 
thing harmonized amid blue granite 
and brown which was profusely spread 
about the rooms. 




W. C. Shoop, '11, is at present con- 
ducting evangelistic services at one of 
the churches on his charge. 



Prof. Ray Light '03 of Lebanon High 

School attended College Day Excerises 

at St. Pauls U. B. Church, West Leb- 

anonon Sunday evening and gave a very 
pleasing address. 

Miss Elsie Arnold of Campbelltown a 
graduate of the conservatory took a very 
prominent part in the special song' 
service held in the Presbyterian 
Church at Derry Church on Nov. 13. 

Prof Balsbaugh, '01, Principal of 
LebanonHigh School made a very 
interseting address at St. PauJ's u 
B. Church West Lebanon Sunday 
evening. 



J. Edward Marshall, '11, spent j ast 
Thursday in Harrisburg. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fleaus 

Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

P. R. KOONTZ, '11 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. A. BRUNNER, '11 

E. A. SPESSARD, '11 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

W. O. ELLIS, '11 

F. R. KENNEDY, '12 
CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, '12 

HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
S. O. GRIMM, '12 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
W. A. Brunner, '11, 
ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 

OLIVER BUTTER WICK '12 
PAUL LOSER, '13 



Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 



Address all business communications 
to W. A. Brunner, Box 916, all other 
matter to Room 19, Administration 
Building Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pa. 



The NEWS extends to all subscribers, 
its best wishes for a happy Thanks- 
giving Season. 

It seems from the general tenor 
fit conversation which is heard from 
time to time that the real signifi- 
cance of Thanksgiving has escaped 
very many people in these hurry 
scurry days materialism. To some it 
means cessation of labor, a holiday, 
turkey and all those delicacies, which 
go with such feasts ; to others a glimpse 
of home and friends, to still others, 
only a dav on which, with a sort of 
Pharisaical pride, to return thanks for 
blessings received. No one should find 
fault with any one of these, but does it 
notnarrow to the last limits that feel- 
ing of joy the Master of Life would 
have all experience? Would it not be 
far better in these times of festivities 
to cast our eyes about us and see if wo 
can not find some one to whom we can 
bring our joy? 

To college students Thankgiving day 
should be a holiday, a feasting, a 
returning of thanks, and with these an 
inspiration to gladden the lives of 
others. 

Ever since the destructive fire of 
1904, the problem of governing'the stu- 
dent body at Lebanon Valley has been 



to a greater or lesser extent occupying 
the minds of the college authorities. 
The occupancy of the new dormitories 
introduced a new regime in student 
life. Various unforseen conditions 
presented themselves which necessi- 
tated a change in the governing policy. 
To the occupants of the men's dormi- 
tories, proctors were disliked and 
undesired. 

Then came the problem of a substi- 
tute. A number of students, after much 
thought, presented a set of rales which 
they themselves wished to follow and 
enforce, thus forming the basis of the 
system of student government at 
Lebanon Valley College. However, 
in time, cases arose to which the 
estalbished regulations were inap- 
plicable. Several years passed before 
an open break occured, but when it 
did come, the result was that a new 
Senior-Junior Council was elected, 
putting the system of government on 
the best basis it had yet attained. 

Probably the greatest success 
achieved by the Council last mentioned 
was the successful directing of inter- 
class contests. But, the council was 
legislative rather than executive, and 
also found problems with which it was 
apparently unable to cope. This led to 
the final dissolution of the council 
several weeks, ago, with no positive 
form of government for the student 
body. Again comes the problem with 
increased force, ' ' How shall ^ur student 
body be governed?" Every good 
form of government is to some extent 
a product of the process of evolution. 
As student self government has taken 
advanced strides in the last few years, 
with each result mure satisfactory 
than its predecessor, we feel confident: 
that our present situation is only a 
marker in the evolutionary develop- 
ment. The fact that both college and 
preparatoryjstudents have been dealt 
with by the same governing body in 
the past, is largely at the bottom of 
the desire for a change. 

What the Council also needs is 
execuive authority combined with the 
legislative. The late council was 
satisfactory as far as it had authority 
but its powers were not backed by 
binding qualities. 

Present indications point to an 
acceptable solution of the problem in 



the near future. Within the past wee k 
committees from the two upper classes 
have been appointed to suggest a new 
form of government, purposing to meet 
the present need and at the same time, 
voice the demands and desires of the 
students as nearly as possible. 
These propositions are to be handed to 
the Faculty Committee for ratification. 

It is to the interests of all parties 
concerned that the greatest co-operation 
should exist [between faculty, com- 
mittees and student body. With such 
prospects we look forward to great 
success in our governing policy, in the 
hope and belief that it',will be the best 
step toward the goal which we are 
anticipating. 



A Request 

In another column some very 
interesting facts about the early history 
of the college appear. This is published 
to meet a need which we feel exists 
at this place. Many such facts of 
interests which have been in a sense 
forgotten will when brought to our 
minds, we hope, endear old L. V. C. to 
us, and stimulate us to greater efforts 
for her sake. Any one having interest- 
ing historical material, in their pos- 
session will please forward same to the 
editors. 

Clio-Kalo Joint Session 

The Clionian and the Kalozetean 
literary societies enjoyed a pleasant 
evening on Friday, Nov. 18, 1910 in a 
joint session of the two societies. 

A splendid program was rendered to 
an appreciative audience of more than 
a hundred people. The program was 
rendered as follows : 

Piano duett, Sara and Paul Strickler ; 
President's address, W. 0. Ellis; 
Original story, C. E. Rettew ; 
Quartette, Misses Gingrich and jdach- 
man, Messrs. Frost and Hayes ; Parody, 
Sarah Zimmerman; Essay"" The Craft 
Guild of Today" D C. Keister; Olive 
Branch and Examiner, Florence Christ- 
eson; Piano Solo, Katie Gingrich. 

The program was one of the best 
ever rendered by the societies in joint 
session. All were at their best. Each 
number held the interest from the 
beginning to [the conclusion. The 
program was so carefully arranged as 
to lend a variety of humor and pleas- 
antry together with more serious 



COLLEGE NEWS 



The Clio7iian Literary Society 
of 

Lebanon Valley College 
requests the honor of your presence 
at its 

Fortieth Anniversary 
Thursday evening, November twenty -fourth 
nineteen hundred and ten 
at eight o'clock 
Engle Conservatory 

Reception 

Ladies Hall 



thought. 

The ability of the performers to 
render their selections was greatly 
shown by the appreciation of the 
audience. Besides the members of 
the societies, there were many guests 
including, Prof. andMrs. A. E. Shroy- 
«r, Mrs. Sheldon, Miss Brown and 
mother, Miss Parks, Miss Sleichter, 
and Miss Brandt, Miss Mary Christ- 
eson, Miss Adams our new professor 
of Oratory and many others from Ann- 
ville. Lebanon, Myerstown and Harris- 
burg. 

At the conclusion of the program, the 
Kalos tended an informal reception 
to the Clios and all present in their new 
reception Hall. Delicious refreshments 
were served. At a seasonable hour 
the guests and members departed, ghd 
that they had been present at the 
best Clio-Kalo joint session held 
within the memory of any present. 



Y. M. C. A. 

The meeting on Sunday afternoon 
was led by James Shively. His sub- 
ject was "The Religions of Service," 
taken from Romans 12 The fol- 
lowing is a brief of his remarks. 
More than nineteen centuries ago a 
young man rose up in a Jewish 
synagogue in Palestine and defined his 
mission in life.. The Spirit of the 
Lord is upon me, because he hath 
annointed me to preach the gospel to 
the poor, he hath sent me to heal the 
broken-hearted, to preach deliverance 
to the captives and recovering of 
sight to the blind, to set at liberty 
those that are bruised. 

His biographers tell us that he went 



about doing good, feeding the hungry, 
clothing [the naked, because of the 
burden of their past wrong-doing. 
When he died he told his disciples: 
As the Father hath sent me into 
the world, so send I you, and he bade 
them receive his" spirit of faith and 
love and carry it out in generous 
service. 

We are often too engrossed in ou r 
ambitions, dominated by our egotism 
and selfishness^that we forget the fellow 
next to us. We do not greet him with 
a pleasant smile, and too often when 
a man is already down we trample 
upon him rather than extend him 
a helping hand and lead him back to 
Christ. 

Though in our study of Philosophy 
and Theology we are apt to fall into 
doubt, yet the study of the life and 
works of Jesus make us determine that 
this man, was the life we want to imi- 
tate, that He holds the secret to a 
happy and useful living. We do not 
reverence Jesus by singing hymns to 
him, by assigning him an exalted place 
in the universe, but by manifestin 
in our own lives the same spirit which 
he manifested in His, by serving our 
generation with unselfish devotion and 
heroism. 1 ' 

The tone of the meeting was excell- 
ent. Several speakers followed Mr. 
Shively with suitable remarks. About 
twenty-five men were out. Let every 
fell ow bring another with him the next 
time. 



A large number of our students at- 
tended the Lebanon High vs. Pottsville 
High foot ball game at Lebanon on 
Saturday last. 





Items of Interest^j 

Russel Weidler, '14, who has been 
out of school several weeks suffering 
with blood-poison in his right hand, 
returned last Tuesday and resumed 
work. 

H. E. Ulrich,'14, was confined to 
his home several days last week on 
account of illness. 

Misses Carrie Light, '12, and Sara 
Zimmerman, '13, attended the College 
day exercises in St. Paul's U. .B 
Church West Lebanon Sunday afternoon 
and evening. 

John Shirk, '14, and V. D. Mul- 
hollen, '13, attended the college day 



Have Your Printing Done by 

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ANNVILLE, PA. 
When You Want THE BETTER GRADE 

Frederick W. Light 

826 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa, 

Representing 
Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Co. 
Of Milwaukee, Wis. 



CHRISTY- "NIFTY" 
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PHILADELPHIA 



COLLEGE N E WS 



exercises at West Lebanon, Sunday. 
The latter made a very pleasing ad- 
dress. 

Prof. H. E. Wanner of the Department 
of Chemistry spent Saturday and 
Sunday with his parents at York, Pa. 

The College day exercises held in 
St. Paul's U. B. Church, West Lebanon 
MarkG. Holtzman, pastor, last Sunday 
were quite successful. The collections 
for the day were more than sufficient 
to meet the pledge made by that con- 
gregation to the Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege debt fund. Much credit is due 
Rev. Holtzman and his congregation 
for the energetic way in which they 
manage such propositions. 

Lester Rhodes, '14, spent Saturday 
and Sunday at the home of his 
parents. 

Many students are preparing to 
spend their Thanksgiving recess at 
their homes. 

President Keister spent the greater 
part of last week in Western Pennsyl- 
vania in the interests of the college. 

N. B. S. Thomas, 12, has been out 
of school during the past week conduct- 
ing evangelistic services at one of 
the churches of which he is pastor. 

Catherine Hershey, 12, spent last 
Thursday in Harrisburg. 

W. L. Murray left on Friday for his 
home at West Fairview, where he will 
remain over the Thanksgiving recess. 

I. K. Potter, '13, who was ill several 
days last week, is out again. 

John Lyter, '14, spent Sunday at the 
home of his parents in Harrisburg. 

Preparations are being made for the 
annual Thanksgiving Dinner to be 
given in the College Dining Hall next 
Thursday. A splendid menu will be 
served, after which toasts from each 
class will follow. Every boarding 
student is looking forwad to this event 
with great anticipation. 

Prof. H. E. Wanner and Amos H. 
Weigel, '13, contemplate attending 
the Pennsylvania-Cornell foot ball 
game at Franklin Field, on Thursday. 

Amos H. Weigel, '13, rendered the 
readings in an entertainment given by 
the Mechanicsburg male choir at 
Shepherdstown, Cumberland county, 
Saturday evening. 

Misses Ruth and Larene Engle spent 
Saturday and Sunday at their homes 
in Harrisburg. 



Apologies to Longfellow 

Tell us not in mournful numbers 

Life is but an empty dream ; 
That we, t lufls, get all the skim milk 

And the Profs, get all the cream. 
Life is earnest so get busy; 

Swing your uppercut and jab ; 
When good things are flying by you, 

Just reach out and take a grab. 



H . G . aiding & Bros . 



Xebanon Valley 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 
ftev. Xawrence JCeister, Pres. 
ytnnville, tPa. 



tfie Ckctric £ity 
Engraving Co. 

BTTFrALO,lT. "ZV 



#T The largest specialists in 
^-•College Engravings in the 
country. 



The 



Spalding 

TRADE MARK 



Kodaks, Cameras 
and Supplies 

Printing and Developing for Amateurs 

HARPEL'S ART STORE 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Learn Wireless & R. R. Telegraphy 

Shortage of fully 10,000 Operators on account of 
8-hour law and extensive "wireless develop- 
ments. We operate under direct supervision on 
Telegraph Officials and positively place all stu- 
dents, when qualified. Write for catalogue. 

Nat'l Telegraph Institute 

Cincinnati, Philadelphia. Memphis, Davenport 
la., Columbia, S. C, Portland, Ore. 




Is known throughout 
the world as a 

Guarantee of 
Quality 



Are the largest 
mamifacturers in 
the world of 

Official 
Equipment 

For All 
Athletic 
Sports and 
Pastimes 

are in 
teres t - 
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Athletic Sport you 
should have acopy 
of the Spalding 
Catalogue. It's a 
complete encyclo- 
pedia o f What's 
New in Sport and 
is sent free on 
request. 



IF YOU 



A. Q. Spalding & Bro. 
1120 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

You are correct if you get your 

LADIES 1 and CENTS 1 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes. 

Standard Steam Laundry and 
Scouring Works 

A. F. Ward '90 Proprieter 

27 N. Seventh St. Lebanon Pa. 

Represented at College 



CFull line of College Post Cards, 
Writing Papers, Envelopes, Tablets. 
Pens, Pencils, Ink, Pictures, Pen 
nants, Box Paper, Photopaste. Also Eyes 
Examined and Glasses Fitted. 

D. B. SHIFFER 
WEST MAIN STREET ANNVILLE, PA 

The CHAS. H. ELLIOTT 
COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in 
the World 

Commencement Invitations 
Class Day Programs and 
Class Pins 



Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

% SCHOOL of \\ 
ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Send for a Catalogue. TROY, N.Y. 



Dance Progrms 
and 

Invitations 
Menus 

Leather Dance 
Cases and 
Covers 




Fraternity 
and 

Class Inserts 
for Annuals 
Fraternity 
and Class 
Stationery 



Wedding Invitations and Calling Cards 
WORKS -17th STREET and LEHIGH 
AVENUE Philadelphia. 

Represented at L. V. C. by 
W, ALBERT BRUNNER 



CLIONIAN ANNIVERSARY NUMBER 

COLLEGE flEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume II. 



flnnville, Pa., Tuesday, November* 29, 1910 



No. 10 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



FORTIETH ANNIVERSARY 

EXERCISES OF THE CLIONIAN 

LITE RARY SOCIETY 

Program Very Successfully Carried Out — Many Alumni and 
Friends Attend — Orations Given in Full 



Thanksgiving Day was a red letter 
day in Clio circles, as it was the 
occasion of the Fortieth Anniversary of 
their society. The usual Anniversary 
exercisus were rendered very pleasinglv 
in the College Chapel at eight o'clock. 
The chapel was tastefully decorated 
for the occasion with bunting in the 
Socitey colors, and with many beautiful 
palms. Guests began to arrive early, 
many coming in time for the College 
Thanksgiving Dinner. By the time 
the exercises began, the Chapel was 
nearly filled with alumni, students and 
friends of Clio. To the strains of 
music rendered by Keim's orchestra, 
secured for the occasion, the speakers 
appeared on the stage. Every address 
showed thorough preparation and care- 
ful training. The participants held the 
close attenton of the large audience 
from start to finish of the program. 
At the conclusion of the literary 
exercises, a reception was held in 
the Ladies' Parlors. The parlors were 
also very tastefully decorated in the 
Society colors, and were very pretty 
indeed. Quite a large number of 
guests'attended the reception, which 
eqjaled any ever given by the Society. 
Delightful refreshments were served. 
Eveybody agreed that the occasion was 
extremely successful, and entertaining. 

The Anniversary program in full 
follows : 

Orchestra, seleted ; Invocation, Prof. 
Shroyer; President's Address, Carrie 



Light: Two Piano Duet, Tannhauser, 
Richard Wagner. Ruth Detweiler, Ora 
Bachman; Oration, The Just Judge, 
Lizzie Lau ; Vocal Solo, (a) Villanelle, 




MISS ESTHER SCHELL 

Who read eulogy 



Eva Dell' Acqua (b) Rcsary, Nevin, 
Edith Gingrich; Oration, After the 
War, Nellie Seltzer; Piano Solo, (a) 
Consolation in D Major, Op. 13 Dennee, 
(b) Gondolieri E Major, Op. 25, No. 
2, Nevin, E. May Meyer; Reading 
Cutting from "The Sign of the Cross," 
W. Barrett, Edna Yarkers; Eulogy, 
Julia Ward Howe, Esther Schell; 
Chorus, The Vine Gatherers, L. Denza, 
Edith Gingrich, Florence Roland, 
Verda Snyder, Helen Brightbill, 
Florence Christeson, Ora Bahman, Eva 
Foltz, Lottie M. Spessard ; Orhestra, 
Selected. 



President's Address. 

Ladies and Gentlemen : We have 
gathered together this evening to 
observe another anniversary of tha 
Clionian Literary Society. We always 
look forward to these exercises because 
they signify the completion of one more 
year's work and the entering upon 
another. 

Year after year, our society offers its 
privileges to the young women who 
leave their homes and come among us 
to pursue a prescribed course of study. 
The choosing of a course is naturally 
their first concern, but no sooner have 
they entered upon their studies than 
they are asked to identify themselves 
with the various student organizations 
that exist in a college. The environ- 
ment in which they find themselves is 
very different from that to which they 
have been rccustomed. To harmonize 
their interests and to come into a vital 
relation with the college life is of far 
reaching importance to the student. 

The college organizations aid the 
young men and women to adjust them- 
selves to their new surroundigs and 
make them feel that they are a part of 
the college life. These may be divided 
into four classes, the athletic, the 
social, the literarv and the religious, 
forming four di tinct supplementary 
agencies, each with a purpose of its 
own. These agencies differ somewhat 
in importance and do not appeal alike 
to the individual student. There is so 
much to claim the attention of the 
student that it becomes a physical 
impossibility to engage actively in all 
of the different organizations, yet to 
withhold from participating to some 
extent in these activities will be detri- 
mental to the best interests of the 
student, and a distinct loss to the 
organization and to the college to which 
they sustain a very close relation. 
Unfortunatelyit happens occasionally 



I 



COLLEGE NEWS 



that a student will allow his work in 
the supplementary agencies to interfere 
with that in his curriculum becoming 
so much engrossed in the former as 
to neglect the latter. The student 
should always be brought to realize 
that his first duty is to his course, but 
that he should share interest; and labor 
in both. 

I think you will agree with me that 
the literaiy society occupies a most 
important position among tli^se supple- 
mentary agencies. Compared with the 
value of many organizations it towers 
far above them. It is to be greatly 
regretted that in many places there is a 
diminution of interest in the literary 
society. Students preparing to sub- 
stitute a club which is purely social or 
one requiring less work and mental 
effort. 

The pre-eminent position of tne lit- 
erary sociteties in our own college 
should be a source of much gratification 
to every one present. For not only 
is the literary society of great help 
and benefit to the student while at 
school, butav3ry important part of its 
work is the preparation whic 1 ! it gives 
for taking part in the many organiza- 
tions of which students are asked to 
become members after leaving college. 

Ihis is the day for organized effort. 
In no other way can as much be 
accomplished. College graduates are 
expected to be the leaders in the or- 
ganizations which are he'ping to solve 
the many intricate problems of our 
complex civilizf tion. The character 
of these organizations depends upon the 
object to be accomplished, civic, 
political, social and religious. College 
graduates owe it to the community in 
which they live ta take an active part 
ill raising the moral tone and the 
standaid of living, and in every way 
possible to bring about a better con- 
dition of affairs. 

The literary society affords a train- 
ing to enable its members if they have 
been faithful in the performance of their 
duties, to enter into the life of the or- 
ganizations referred to, to know the 
methods of organizing, to preside, to 
see that the work is conducted in a 
proper and oiderly way, to work with 
others, to speak extemporaneously, to 
prepare a statement carefully and to 
present it in a clear, concise and forci- 
ble way. 

These thing3, we as members of the 
Clionian L'terary Society are striving 



to attain. This year has been a most 
pleasant year in our society. Our 
programmes are very interesting and 
every girl enjoys helping to make them 
so. We delight in going into our 
society hall, because it is the place we 
govern. At th^t place, all class pre- 
judices are laid aside. We meet there 
with one common aim and interest. 
Our efforts are united and the result 
must be success. A result which has 
attended us so far this fall, in that we 
have been able to pay the entire debt 
of our hall. 

We are glad for your presence. We 
hope that to-night's program will be 
a source of interest and pleasure to 
you. In behalf of the society, I 
welcome you to these the fortieth 
anniversary exercises of the Clionian 
Literary Society. 

The Just Judge. 

It was in the county court rcoms of 
one of our large Western cities one 
night that a boy was accused of 
laiceny. The hour was late, the 
calendar was long, and the Judge was 
sitting overtime. Weary of the weary 
work, the men were forcing the mach- 
inery of the [law to grind out at full 
speed the dull routine of Justice. All 
sorts of cases go before this court and 
the Judge had long since tired of its 
monotonous round. This case of petty 
larceny was plain and it could be 
disposed of in short crier. The sleepy 
policeman brought forth his witness 
and the case was sworn out. There 
was scarcely any denial of the charge 
and the Judge ordered that what the 
law prescribed for such cases should 
be done. That was all. In the same 
breath the next case was called when 
something happened, something a little 
out of the ordinary. 

A cry, the shriek of a broken hearted 
woman was heard. There was nothing 
so unusual in that, however. In ou r 
public court rooms, disturbances of 
this kind are frequent. They are all 
dealt with in the same manner, and 
again the bailiff arose to do his duty. 
But the Judge on the bench was Ben. 
B. Lindsey, the famous Judge of the 
Juvenile court of Denver. This incident 
happened, however, before he was 
famous. There was no Juvenile court 
then. Lindsey was only a young 
struggling lawyer and politician who 
had been but recently appointed to the 
Judgeship. His experiences in politics, 



however, had been long enough to 
teach him the corruptness, the injustice 
of the system and it made him sick 
at heart. That is, perhaps, why he 
heard that heart rending cry from thd 
rear of the room. One sad heart most 
easily recognizes another. This fact, 
undoubtedly caused the judge to pause 
in his rapid work of administering 
Justice and he paused to uphold the 
woman. 

"I had noticed her before." the 
Judge said, "an J I thought she 
looked like a cave dweller. I didn't 
connect her with the case in question. 
I didn't think of her in any human 
relationship whatsoever. For that 
matter, I hadn't considered the larceny 
case in any human way until that 
mother's cry startled me into humanity. 
It was an awful cry, a terrible sight 
and I was stunned. I looked at the 
prisoner before me again and this time 
I saw a boy, an Italian boy. Not a 
thief, not a lose criminal, only a bad 
boy. I called him back and had the 
woman brought before me and talked 
with them as mother and son. I learned 
that this boy had a home, The thought 
made me shudder. I had almost sent 
him among criminals when he had a 
home and a mother to go to. And that 
was the Law! I stopped the machinery 
of Justice to pull that boy out of its 
grinders." But -he was guilty and 
what was to be done with him. 

That was the great question that 
rang in the Judge's ear unceasingly. 
He came to a great new and ancient 
discovery that what we are after to- 
day are men, and men are but boys 
grown up. But how was the problem 
to be solved? The way in which he 
did solve it can be detected in his own 
words. "The great movements for 
the betterment of our children are 
simply typical of the noblest spirit of 
his age, that Christ-like spirit of un- 
selfish love, of hope, and of joy." 
The old process of punishing and 
guiding the child is now completely 
changed. No wiser method could be 
found for all our departments of justice. 
"Instead of coming to destroy, we 
come to rescue; instead of coming to 
punish we come to upl'ft; instead cf 
coming to hate, we come to love." 

That the man has this deep sig- 
nificance is shown by the gradual, 
apparently accidental way in which he 
developed his "methods" and his court. 
He couldn't think them out. But he 



COLLEGE'N E~ W S 




MISS NELLIE SELTZER 



MISS EDNA YARKERS 



had a heart, and when the cave dweller 
cry reached it, he found himself. 
From that time on, Lindsey put his 
heart into his business. He didn't know 
what probation was when he decided to 
take care of that Italian boy. The idea 
of the Juvenile court had not yet 
dawned upon him. 

It took "cases" to set him thinking, 
and many came. One day he noticed a 
burglary on the calendar. Looking 
around for the criminals, the Judge 
saw three bright American boys. Upon 
inquiring he learned that they had been 
caught robbing a pigeon loft. There 
was no doubt about the crime, the boys 
would be sent to the reformatory, of 
course. The ruling officer however, 
shook his head, ana why? He was 
recalling just then, the time when he 
as a boy, went robbing a pigeonloft, 
that very same one that these boys had 
robbed, as further investigation re- 
vealed. 

The Judge had not actually committed 
burglary, although he would have, if 
his "nerve" had not failed him. He 
got "scared" at the very last minute 
a nd ran away. But now the law 
expected him, a Judge, to send to prison 
these boys who were no worse than he. 
To the Judge's eyes they were even 
better becauee they had the "sand" he 
'ack^d. But what was to be done with 
the offenders? 

Lindsey says he learned "out of the 
mouths of babes". He took those 
Prisoners into a room and talked with 
them. Ihat was the first of many 



confer°nces which have been the means 
of saving more than one boy from a 
criminal's end. Many people regarded 
these talks with superstition. The 
police even started a story that he was a 
hypnotist for he gets such wonderful 
results. He gets the entire confidence 
and respect of the boys. They not 
only honor but also love him. Viewing 
the probation system in the light of 
all it has accomplished, we must say 
that friendship is the key. The Judge 
talks to the boys as they talk to each 
other. He invites them to his home, 
he takes long walks with them, he 
studies, carefully handles, and helps 
them. Is it any wonder that he gains 
their confidence? 

Is it so marvellous that he can 
impress on their young minds the sin 
and wrong in either surprising or 
"snitching" as they call tattling? He 
makes them feel that it is only the 
weak who yield. And what child will 
not respond when its honor, its 
strength, is appealed to? 

Lindsey's deep understanding of a 
boy's nature can possibly be attributed 
to the circumstances surrounding his 
own youth. There he felt the cold 
loneliness of a life void of friendship. 
He was a poor boy who had to earn his 
own living. Hard work was required 
and he was often worn out and no- 
body appreciated it. He was only doing 
his duty and it nearly killed him. He 
sank under his burden to the very 
verge of despair. There he learned 
the value of a kind word of sympathy 



and good cheer and its lesson is serving 
him well through life. 

And what is the result? We all 
know how much good the Juvenile 
^ouit has been doirg in Denver; we 
know, too, how many dark crimes, how 
many unworthy officers and how many 
disobey ed laws and grafts wete exposed 
by the Judge in nider to save the child. 
He forced the illegal wine houser, 
which had been meeting places for boy a 
and gills, to be closed. 

Saloon-keepers no longer dar>?d to 
sell liquor and tobacco to minors 
because of the sure punishment that 
would followed. Factories were in- 
spected until childlabcr laws were 
strictly enforced. All this and more 
the Judge accomplished. 

Naturally enougn, he was cut on 
the street by other officials, the objects 
of many of his inspections and decis- 
ions. He was hissed, his own political 
party even turned against him because 
he would notgive up his court. Lindsey 
was firm and in the struggle which is 
still going on, he has thus far come out 
victorious. A decided test of Judge 
L'ndsey's influence came in 1904. He 
knew that he would have to make the 
election if he wanted his work to go on. 

His own political party offered him 
no support. He had exposed its crimes. 
The business men of the town would 
not hear him, he had lessened their 
profits. 

In despair he turned to his only real 
friends, the boys. He had been the 
important factor in their lives and they 
were eager to do something for him. 
On the day of the election they poured 
into the streets, marched up and down, 
yelling for Lindsey. The city resounded 
with their song of "Who, which, when? 
Wish we were men so that we could 
vote for our little Ben." All day 
long, everywhere, the boys kept at 
it. And the result was success, a 
decided success for their Judge. 

Now may we ask whether friendship 
is paying in the life of Judge Lindsey? 

Was it worth while for him to lay 
aside "big" cases in which much more 
was concerned in order to establish 
and preside over the Juvenile Court? 
Will it mean anything in the future 
ysars of our country that the thoughts, 
the ambitions of these erring children 
have been directed into paths cf 
industry, honor, and duty? 

Paul Thiean says that Lindsey is 
the first citizen of Colorado and that 



COLLEGE NEWS 



his work, not the mines, mills, rail- 
roads, and farms, but Judge Lindsey's 
work is the greatest thing the state 
has yet produced. And looking at it 
from the standpoint of that poor lcnely 
boy who was one day sitting in the 
court-room watching the judge deal out 
justice, when he suddenly rushed up, 
kissed the judge and with tears in his 
eyes, said "I love you," looking at it 
from his standpoint, I say, we must 
agree that it is the greatest thing 
Colorado has yet produced. 

After The War. 

It is hardly possible to estimate the 
great joy and thanksgiving of the 
North when Lee's surrender was pro- 
claimed. The news, which had been 
looked for so long, was receive^ with 
shouts of welcome. The hearts of 
the peoDle bubbled with delight at the 
thought that they would soon see their 
loved ones who had gone forth to fight 
for their country's welfare. Some, 
however, were sad because of the fact 
that a few near and dear to them 
would never return, yet with the bitter 
thought came a deep prayer of thank- 
fulness that now finally it was over. 
There would be no more battles, no 
more prisons, no more lists of dead and 
wounded. The war was over, the cause 
was won. Signs of gladness were seen 
everywhere; houses were decorated 
and the American flag was flung to the 
breeze. 

Only too soon their joy was turned 
to grief. On the eve of April four- 
teenth, 1865, the war-heated blood of 
the nation was frozen with sudden hor- 
ror at a deed which then had ro parallel 
in American history. As on the wings 
of lightning came the news "the 
President is shot"— "is dying" "is 
dead." Men scarcely knew how to 
credit this tale. When the truth was 
really known all bowed their heads and 
wept. Common grief took uncommon 
garb. Houses changed their bright 
decoraticns for those of more sombre 
hue. The American flag hung pensively 
at half mast ; portraitures of the loved 
dead were found on all. And dreary 
as the day was, the patiiots' hearts 
were still drearier. It was if as chaos 
and dread night had come again. 

Great mobs gathered everywhere, 
frantic with fear that some dread 
conspiracy would redden the North with 
innocent blood and hand over the 
government to treason and traitors. 



In New York the mob as uncontroll- 
able. General Butler from the balcony 
of the Exchange Building tried to 
pacify the seething crowd, but all in 
vain. From the mob there rose aery 
"the WorlJ," "the office of the 
Worlo," and the mass of crazed men 
began to moveas one man to that office. 
Destruction of property, loss of life, 
violence andanarchy, were in that 
movement. Apparently no human power 
could fheck its progress But a man 
stepped out on the balcony and held 
his arm aloft. His commanding atti- 
tude arrested universal attention. Per- 
haps he was going to give them news, 
ihey waited. But while they listened 
the voice, — it was the voice of General 
Garfield, —only said: 

"Fellow citizens: Clouds and dark- 
ness are around about Him : His pa- 
villion is dark waters and thick clouds 
of the skies: Justice and Judgement 
are established of His throne: Mercy 
and truth shall go before His face: 
Fellow citizens: God reigns and the 
government at Washington still lives. ' ' 
The tide of popular fury was stayed. 
The impossible had been accomplished. 
Rage was turned to grief. On the 
day of Lincoln's burial bells were tolled 
throughout the land, minute guns were 
fired, business was suspended, and the 
thoughtful betook themselves to" 
prayer. Flowers beautified the life- 
less remains, dirges were sung, the 
people's great heart broke out into 
sobs and sighing. The train of mourn- 
ers who followed his cortege extended 
many hundred miles in length. It was 
a procession of mourners bewailing him 
who had so successfully guided the 
nation through the agony of a Civil 
War and who had been thus prematurely 
lost. Yes, we may say prematurely, 
for if Lincoln, "with Charity for all 
and malice toward none," had lived, 
there would have been no bitter feeling 
between the North and South and race 
prejudice could never have existed. 

One of Lincoln's most cherished 
desires was to see the disbandment of 
the army, but the cruel hand of the 
assassin prevented it. Nine months 
after his death eight hundred thousand 
soldiers had been returned to their 
homes. From the beginning to the 
end of the disbandment the great 
Napoleonic War Rule— time is every- 
thing -was vigorously enforced. 

But what followed was more won- 
derful ! As soon as the order for dis- 



bandment had gone forth the North had 
begun to ask itself what they were 
going to do with the million men about 
to flood the country. It recalled that 
after the Napoleonic Wars France was 
alive with beggars and cripples, and 
that the end of the Thirty Years' War 
had filled Germany with marauding 
muskateers. Several states asked the 
war department for troops to keep the 
disbanded soldiers in order. Yet by 
November eight hundred thousand 
soldiers had been disbanded, and noth- 
ing had happened. They seemed to 
have disappeared : What had become 
of them? 

'I he soldiers of 1865 had gone to work. 
They did not ask to be coddled 
They realized the sincerity of the 
enthusiasm and helpfulness which met 
them on every hand. For the sake of the 
ones whom they lovod, these men, in 
whom love of danger and adventure 
had become a strong passion, hung up 
their arms and cheerfully began to earn 
their daily bread. 

But what became of the Southern 
soldiers while the Union army was dis- 
banding? They too turned their weary 
footsteps homeward, if one may call 
it home. The Confederate soldier had 
left his beautiful and prospeious home 
at the outbreak of the war, filled with 
hope of victory. At the end of the 
war, half-hearted, half-starved and 
exhausted by wounds, he returned, in 
a ragged and dirty uniform, to find his 
home in ashes, his family scattered, 
his labor system destroyed by the 
emancipation of the slaves, and his 
money worthless. 

What did the confederate soldier do? 
Did he sit down in despair? No. He 
set to work immediately trusting that 
God who had taken away his prosperity 
would help him in his adversity Bv 
June the fields, which had been scenes 
of terrible slaughter in April, were 
green with harvest. The women with 
patience and heroism "that fit them 
always as a garment" did their share 
of the work. Since they had no 
slaves the burden of household duties 
fell upon them. This, however, was 
not done without bitterness, but the 
ch^erfuness that prevailed was 
indeed wonderful. 

Even to this day the Southerner 
cherishes the memory of that war. 
H. W. Grady in his speech on "The 
Old South and the New" expresses the 
sentiment of the whole South when 




COLLEGE NEWS 




MISS CARRIE LIGHT 



MISS LIZZIE LAU 



he says: "In my native town of 
Athens is a monument that crowns its 
central hill — a plain white shaft. Deep 
cut into its shining side is a name 
dear to me above the names of men 
—that of a brave and simple man 
who died in a brave and simple faith. 

"Not for all the glories of New 
England from Plynioth Ruck all the 
way would I exchange the heritage he 
left me in his soldier's death. To the 
foot of that shaft I shall send my child- 
ren's children to reverence him who en- 
nobled their name with his heroic blood. 
But speaking from the shadow of that 
memory, which I honor as I do nothing 
else on earth, I say the cause in which 
he suffered and for which he gave his 
life was adjudged by a higher and fuller 
wisdom than his or mine, and I am 
glad that the omniscient God held the 
balance of battle in His Almighty 
Hand and that slavery was banished 
forever from American soil, and the 
American Union was saved from wreck 
of war." 

Reading 

One of the most pleasing features 
of the program was the reading given 
by Miss Edna Yarkers who presented 
a cutting from "The Sign of the 
Cross," a synopsis of which follows: 
THE LOVE OF BERENICE 

"The scene is Rome. The time, 
that of Nerb. Marcus, the Perfect is 
beloved by Berenice, a patrician woman 
of great wealth and beauty and also by 
Poppeae, Nero's wife. But he loves 



Mercia, a Christian giil, whom he 
rescued from the persecutions of the 
Councellor and Licinus, employed by 
Nero. Dacia is a gossiping friend 
of Berenice. 

"Dacia, Cnuncellor and Licinus visit 
Berenice to tell her of the news of 
Marcus and also to taunt her about 
his love for Mercia. She receives the 
news coldly to outward appearances. 
Marcus arrives and the others leave. 
Berenice demands the news of Mercia. 
She professes her love for him but is 
rejected." 

Ihe reader deserves much credit for 
the commendable way in which she 
presented this interesting selection. 
The keen attention and interest of the 
audience showed in a marked degree 
their appreciation of the number. 

Julia Ward Howe 

In a rather small old-fashioned home 
on Beacon Street, half way between 
the public gardens, and the Back Bay 
lived one of America's notable women 
who has seen the civilzation of America 
form itself and has added potent 
ingredients to it. 

In the parlor of this little home have 
sat and talked the greatest men of 
America and the best of her visitors. 
There were times of merry-making and 
intercourse with scholarly men. These 
seem to have left in the atmosphere 
some indefinable flavor, like a lingering 
perfume which tells even the casual 
visitor that there has been high 
thinking and noble speech. 



Julia Ward Howe was born in 
eighteen hundred and nineteen in a 
handsome home in Bowling Green at 
that time the fashionable part of New 
York City. Her ancestors were 
prominent factors during the early 
colonial period. Her father a wealthy 
merchant and banker, was a man of re- 
spect and reserved mann rs and with a 
vein of true geniality and a great bene- 
volence of Heart. Her mother, Julia 
Cutler Ward, was a woman of beauty 
and intellect. Dpath separated her from 
her family at the age of twenty-eight, 
leaving six little children, the fourth, 
Julia, only five years of age. 

This distressing blow was great to 
the banker and his little flock but he was 
somewhat condoled by the arrival of 
Mrs. Ward's sister, Miss Eliza Cutler, 
who came to bring up the children. 
Many curious instances are related 
concerning the conspicuous colors in 
which she dressed the children. One 
day Julia is said to have come from 
school with one blue shoe and one 
green. But in spite of all, her mind 
was never set on fashions either in 
childhood or in later life. What she 
desired was that which was uplifting 
and tended toward building character. 

At the age of nine she studied 
Paley's Moral Philosophy with those 
twice her age. Yet, with a love for 
studies beyond her years, she was a 
child at heart. Her youth was pure, 
happy and strenuous, in many things 
privileged. 

Discovering early a strong love of 
reading and knowledge, to-gether with 
marks of great strength and activity of 
mind, proper care was taken by her 
worthy father to provide for her ed- 
ucation. He procured the best teachers 
in music, Germam and Italian. And 
later she was sent to one of the most 
conservative of boarding schools, where 
blackboards and all the appliances for 
forming prim young lady-hood were 
in vogue. Her college life was 
brilliant and without a stain. Her 
individuality was so great that she came 
from this institution to be the apostle 
of equal rights of men and women 

When Julia was fourteen, her 
father purchased a mansion on the 
corner of Broadway and Bond Streets. 
Artists as well as musicians and 
authors came to visit the picture 
gallery and accept the Ward hos- 
pitality, and returned the courtesy by 
Continued on 1st column next page 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College J^etus 

Issued weekly during- the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

P. R. KOONTZ, '11 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. A. BRUNNER, '11 

E. A. SPESSARD, '11 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

W. O. ELLIS, '11 

F. R. KENNEDY, '12 
CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, '12 

HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
S. O. GRIMM, '12 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
W. A. Brunner, '11, 
ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 

OLIVER BUTTERWICK '12 
PAUL LOSER, '13 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 
to W. A. Brunner, Box 916, all other 
matter to Room 19, Administration 
Building Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pa. 

Ever since the second year in the 
history of man, there have been anni- 
versaries, at least not before that time. 
In our college life, we are not different 
from the ordinary. We have greater 
or lesser organizations which are near 
and dear to us, and next to our college 
no organization receives our devotion so 
entirely as does our several societies. 

It has been the great pleasure of 
the editorial staff of the NEWS, to 
devote an extra sheet to the exclusive 
use of each respective society at its 
anniversary season. We take exceeding 
pleasure in giving this week's publica- 
tion to the use of the CLIONIAN 
Literary Society, and extend to that 
organization our heartiest congratula- 
tions for the virtuous tenor and 
successful rendition of their delightful 
anniversary exercises. 

Julia Ward Howe 



Continued from preceding page 

displaying their talents. This offered 
a grand opportunity for Miss Julia to 
come in contact with the scholars of 
the day. So well did she perform her 
part on the instrument, that her friends 
urged her to devote her life to music. 
The influences of her home, father, 
excellent aunt and noble friends, these 
influences on her heart were strong and 
elevating. 



She discovered in the library the 
stimulation and the food of intellectual 
life, and arank unawares from the 
moral and physical aspects about her, 
the lesson and power of contenment and 
self-trust. She began to read Shake- 
speare and Byron and then tried her 
hand at poem3 and plays. These were 
published in various magazines and 
resulted in attracting attention which 
encouraged her to attempt greater 
tasks. 

Not long after the death of her 
father, Julia, who was now a very 
attractive young woman went to Bos- 
ton. There she met men like Sumner, 
Mann, Emerson and others of the 
intellectual class Among these was 
Dr. Samuel Howe, who had already 
been a noted philanthropist and re 
former. He was an enthusiastic 
democrat, a republican of republicans, 
whose creed was the love of humanity. 
He had paid particular attention to the 
study of the deaf and blind and was 
the first man in America to do anything 
towards lightening their darkened con- 
ditions. When the Greeks were in a 
state of starvation he pleaded elo- 
quently with the Americans until he 
received a filled vessel for their relief. 
The famishing people looked upon him 
as an ang^l from heaven. 

When Julia Ward met Dr. Howe, who 
was eigh f een years her senior, it was 
not strange that among many admirers 
he won her hand. He found in her 
an ardent sympathizer. As early as 
her wedding trip she began to make 
impressions which have hardened into 
facts of American life. When Mr. and 
Mrs. Howe made their extensive wed- 
ding trip in Europe, they took with 
them as a companion Horace Mann. 
The young bride full of her husbands 
projects, talked them to Mr. Mann, with 
the result that the Horace Masn institu- 
tions for the blind are among our 
charities. 

On their return to Boston, Dr. and 
Mrs. Howe were welcomed as the 
friends of men and women who gave 
that city its reputation as a centre of 
culture. Dr. Howe was given the 
director-ship of an institution for the 
blind, the young mother on account of 
the large garden and the conservatories 
of the estate, called it in half sport, 
"Green Peace" 

Into this happy home were born six 
children. "Green Peace" was a home 
where the literary mother and philan- 



thropic father found their greatest 
comfort. Mrs. Howe with her 
beautiful voice eitertained her children 
with German songs and when they 
desired a change, would compose both 
music and words. There was no end 
of happy times provided by the devoted 
mother for the children. "A party or 
a picnic was never complete without 
"mother." 

In spite of all these meirymakings 
for the li'tle tots, Mrs. Howe found 
ample time for study and writing, 
especially when thej were at their 
charming summer home with its old 
mill and waterfall, at Lawton's 
Valley in Newport. It was here that 
she wrote many of her essays and poems 
for various magazines. She was never 
seen idle. What she called rest was 
thought by many to be very hard work. 
She rested herself after a days work by 
reading Greek books and Plato in the 
original, which gave her the greatest 
intellectual enjoyment in the later 
years of her life. 

Dr. and Mrs. Howe were ardent 
workers for the anti-slavery cause. 
They edited an antislavery paper and 
were leaders with Garrison, Philips, 
and Sumner. Mis. Howe says it was 
her husband who suggested the holding 
of meetings in Boston for the discussion 
of the problem with abolitionists on 
one side and pro-slaverymen on the 
other. 

Mrs. Howe was a woman of brilliant 
and quick perceptions, and an impres- 
sion seemed to fix itself upon hermir.d 
until it bore fruit of some kind. When 
Dr. and Mrs. Howe were visiting 
Washington in eighteen hundred and 
sixty-one, making their way there thru 
a line of guarding pickets, they drove 
out some distance from the city withMr. 
and Mrs. Freeman Clark tr attend 
a review of the troops. The enemy 
interrupted the proceedings and the 
Boston party was hastily escorted back 
to the city. On the way the soldiers 
sang, "John Brown's Body," Mr. 
Clarke seeing Mrs. Howe's intense 
face as she listened to the martial 
music, said to her, "you ought to write 
some new words to that tune," "I 
will," she replied. In the gray of the 
next dawn she awoke to find the lines 
arranging themselves in her mind. She 
lay quite still until the last word 
framed itself she immediately arose 
and in half darkness wrote them down. 

The song was first sung in Libby 



COLLEGE NEWS 



prison and then the words were caught 
up and carried from prison to battle 
field. 

"He has sounded forth the trumpet 
that shall never call retreat. 

He is sifting out the hearts of men 
before His judgement seat," 
echoed until victory was sounded. 
These verses have a moral and patriotic 
elevation of feeling, expressed with 
poetic grace and imagination, which 
places them far above most of this 
period; and it seems that their pop- 
ularity will endure throughout the 
ages. 

From this time on she devoted the rest 
of her life as a writer, lecturer on 
woman suffrage and prison refurms. 
She gave a series of parlor lecturer to 
her personal friends on subjects such 
as, "Liberty," "Equality," "Fra- 
ternity," "The Best of Success," 
and others. These lectures were so 
much enjoyed that she was asked to 
read them in public. 

Mrs. Howe's third journey across 
the Atlantic caused her to becume 
intensely interested in woman Suffrage. 
In eighteen hundred and sixty nine she 
was earnestly requested to sign with 
others, a call for a woman's suffrage 
convention, which she did. "From 
that time forth, ' ' she said, ' ' I marched 
to the music of a new hope; and alj 
the years that have passed since then 
I have never had occasion to regret the 
departure which I made then and 
there." 

After the death of Dr. Howe she 
devoted herself untiringly to everything 
that she thought might elevate hu- 
manity. She lectured in all parts of 
the United States, also in Florence, 
Italy, and Athens and always proved 
herself the elegant, wellbred, highly 
educated woman. She preached- in 
many American pulpits, regardless of 
the criticism which was passed upon 
her. She felt sure that the barriers 
against women would slowly be broken 
down and that the time was coming 
when women would have all the po- 
litical and industrial privileges of men. 

Mrs. Howe's close association with 
most of the great men and women and 
the most intellectual society of America 
during the last half century makes her 
a true representative of the best type 
of womanhood in American life. It 
has been her lifelong ambition to 
exercise influence toward right living. 
In reply to a remark that her character 



and appearance resembled that of 
Queen Victoria, she said that she would 
far rather be counted among the in- 
fluential women of America than to be 
Queen of England. It seems almost 
impossible to say that her ambition has 
been realized. But in the quiet of her 
drawing room she was found at her 
beat. It was there that her bright- 
ness of intellect and warmth of woman- 
ly sentiment shone forth. 

She never hesitated to give her 
opinion on any Fubject when questioned. 
The following are some of her ideas of 
young women : 

"The world looks to women and 
depends upon them for its moral and 
spiritual advancement. They are 
going up and men are going with 
them. One sex cannot advance alone, 
the progress must be mutual. That 
is why I believe in co-education." 

"It is sometimes said that women 
are what men make them. It is much 
truer to say that men are what women 
make them. The best elements of 
society are conserved in women." 

Mrs. Howe thinks that out of the 
stimulating new conditions will come 
the representative twentieth century 
American girl, who will be the high- 
est type of girl the world has seen. 

Mrs. Howe's daughters have been 
followers of htjr theories. They have 
seen their mother preside over suffrage 
societies all their lives and as they 
grew older each of them took active- 
part. Thru all their works can be 
seen the leaven of their mother's spirit, 
the love of liberty. . 

Julia Ward Howe had a large circle 
of friends, her hospitailty was bound- 
less. She was just, pure, generous, 
and affectionate. She possessed re- 
markable intellectual power, force of 
will, elaborate culture and power of 
eloquence. Entering with all her 
heart intc the cause of liberty, her 
ability, patriotism, and power with 
the pen naturaly . drew upon her a 
large participation in the most im- 
portant, concerns Wherever she was 
there was found a soul devoted to 
the cause, power to defend and main- 
tain it, andwilingnes to incur all its 
hazards. 

The objects of her life were ac- 
complished and the drama was ready 
to be closed on Octiber seventeen, 
nineteen hundred and ten. It has closed 
only over mature years, over long 
protracted public service, over the 



weakness of age and over life itself, 
only when the course of life had been 
fulfilled. Her departure has left an 
immense void in American society. 
Her life was blended with the history 
of the country, her death has touched 
the strings of public sympathy. 

The tree which she had helped to 
plant is flourishing, its leaves are green 
and buds are coming forth, the branches 
are continually increasing the length 
of their protecting arms, no storm is 
able to overturn it, for its roots have 
taken a firm hold. 

Thanksgiving Banquet 

A large gathering of students and 
friends of the college enjoyed the 
banquet at the ladies' dormitory on 
Thursday. 

It is customary for the senior class 
to arrange decorations and toasts, both 
of which were admirably planned this 
season. Some party kindly presented 
chrysanthemums for the tables. The 
dining hall looked very pretty when the 
jolly company filed into their places »s 
assigned by card. 

President Keister offered the blessing 
and the following menu was served : 

Roast Turkey 
Giblet Sauce Cranberry Sauce 

Sweet Potatoes 
Lima Beans 
Celery Olives 

Scalloped Oysters 
Fruit Salad Salted Wafers 

Ice Cream 
Cocoanut Cake Salted Nuts 

Chocolate Mints 
Coffee. 

The last course was followed by the 
toasts. Mr. 0. T. Ehrhart, '11, was 
toastmaster. He presented the 
different speakers of the occasion in his 
usual affable and pleasing manner. 

The first speaker introduced was Mr. 
Harry Charlton, "4, who spoke on 
' ' Freshman Impressions. ' ' The speaker 
very ably and pleasantly handled his 
subject from a Freshman's stand point. 

"The White and Blue" by Miss Edna 
Yarkers, '13, could not have been 
better rendered. Her thought was 
superb, and the call for devotion to the 
old emblem impressed all present with 
a new sense of appreciation for their 
Alma Mater. 

Absolutely impartial as far as ties 
are concerned, sympathetic in her 
criticism, generous in her feelings and 
kindly to her enemies, Miss Lizzie 
Lau, '12, presented "Our Seniors." 
Mr. Artus O. Kauffman, '11 the 



1 



COLLEGE NEWS 



last speaker, spoke on "Evolutions. " 

Among the serious evolutions 
mentioned were those of the campus, 
of ideals, the faculty and finance. Mr. 
Kauff-nan had a pathetic subject, but 
he made it interesting and as painless 
as possible for those who knew condi- 
tions. 

President Keister made a short ad- 
dress, on " Happiness "'. and the value 
in making it an immediate issue. 

It makes us all feelgood to hear the 
good wit and humor as well as the 
wholesome advice of our worthy Presi- 
dent. 

As a suitable climax to our happy 
banquet, the Alma Mater was sung and 
a yell given for Lebanon Valley. 



Items of Interest 





Porf. H. E. Wanner was a Phila- 
delphia visitor during the Thanksgiving 
recess. During his stay in the city he 
witnessed two foot ball games, the 
Penn-Cornell game on Thanksgiving 
and the Navy- Army game on Saturday. 

Amos H. Weigle, '13, spent several 
days in Philadelphia last week. 

Miss Elizabeth Cooper, of Lambert- 
ville, N. J., was the guest of Miss 
Edith Lehman, 13. during the Thanks- 
giving vacation. 

Mrs. Ruth Lambert Bailey, of 
Hagerstown, Md., was a guest of Miss 
Helen Brightbill over Thanksgiving. 
She attendej the Clionian Literary 
Socitey Anniversary. 

Miss Edith Breight, of Harrisburg, 
attended the Anniversary of the 
Clionian Literary Society on Thanks- 
giving evening. 

Artus O. Kaumffan, '11, was at his 
home in Dallastown over Saturday and 
Sunday. 

Miss Edith Brunner, of Reading, 
spent Sunday and part of Monday, at 
Annville as the guest of Miss Josephine 
Urich, '14. 

Miss Edith Morrison, '14, was the 
guest of Miss Merle Behny, of Leb- 
anon, on Sunday. 

Forrest Hensel, '12, was the guest 
of his parents at Lykens over Saturday 
and Sunday. 

Samuel Grimm, '12, spent several 
days last week at his home at Red 
Lion. 



aCebanon Walley 
College 



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COIiliEGE ^EWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Volume II. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, Deeembep 6, 1910 l^o. 11 

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 




We present with this issue of the 
"News"a picture of the late President 
Bierman, the anniversary of whose 
birth occurred December 1. Dr. Bier- 
man was a warm friend of the college. 
He was a member of the first Faculty 
and at the time of his death he held 
the important position of Treasurer. 
During the severe financial crisis of 
the nineties he was its President. 
Dr. Bierman's thorough and acccurate 
knowledge of the history of the college, 
his acquaintance with the constituency 
and particularly with the al Jmni, added 
to his deep devotion to the college in 
its varied interests made his advice and 
hi3 suggestion almost invaluable. 



During the later years of his official 
relationship he endeared himself to 
the students by his intelligent sympathy 
with their work. 

The securing of the "Dodge Fund" 
thru his uniiring efforts is only one of 
the many lasting monuments to the 
honored memory of Dr. Bierman at 
Lebanon Valley College. Always 
loyal to the college and its interests, 
however dark the gathering clouds of 
opposition were, his true devotion to 
her welfare, and the firmness with 
which he followed his convictions, 
should be a lesson to all students and 
Alumni of Lebanon Valley to redouble 
their energies for h^r service. 



Calendar. 

\ — 

luesday— Dec. 6, 6 p.m. Prayer 
meeting. 

Friday Dec. 9, 7:15 p. m. K. L. 
S., 7:30 p. m. Clio-Philo joint session. 

Sunday— Dec. 11, I p. m. Christian 
Associations. 




Born to Mr. and Mrs. Galen Light 
of Boston, a daughter. i r. Light 
graduated with the clabs of '99. 

President W. G. Clippinger, '99, of 
Otterbein visited at the college on 
Dec.l. Mr. Ciippinger came to Ann- 
ville from New York, where he had 
been to see Mr. John D. Rockefeller 
in the interest of an endowment fund 
for Otterbein. 

In the Westfield College Bulletin 
appears the opening address which was 
delivered bv Professor Charles C. 
Peters, A.M. '05, at the opening exer- 
cises of Westfield College which took 
place on Wedenesday, Sept. 14. Mr. 
Peters received his degree from 
Harvard last year. He took for his 
subject: "The Social Element in 
Education." 

Amos W. Herman, '07, of York, 
was a college visitor on Monday. 

Rev. Pearl Mathias, '05, and Mrs. 
Mathias visited the college last week. 

Miss Reba F. Lehman, '00, spent 
Thanksgiving at home. 

Among the Alumni who spent Thanks- 
giving here were: Mr. Park Eiben- 
shade, '07, and wife, Mj. Allen Ruth- 
erford, '10, Miss Myrtle Garrett, '10, 
Miss Lucy Seltzer, '10 Mr. V. O. 
Weidler, '10,'Mr. M. F. Lehman, '07, 

Continued on page 4 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College flecus 

Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

P. R. KOONTZ, '11 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. A. BRUNNER, '11 

E. A. SPESSARD, '11 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

W. O. ELLIS, '11 

F. E. KENNEDY, '12 
CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, '12 f 

HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
S. O. GRIMM, '12 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
W. A. BRUNNER, '11, 
ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 

OLIVER BUTTER WICK '12 
PAUL LOSER, '13 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 
to W. A. Brunner, Box 916, all other 
matter to Room 19, Administration 
Building Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pa. 

Editorial 

What formerly seemed impossible to 
some, is now being accomplished by 
others. Two years ago we were told 
that however great was the need of a 
college paper, it would be impossible 
to interest enough of the alumni to 
make it a paying proposition. Those 
who advised us thus were wrong. 

Our present manager has greatly 
increased the subscription list, has 
pushed the advertising scheme success- 
fully, has secured second class rates 
from Uncle Sam, and fared admirably 
with the printers. 

Now it seems that some alumni are 
still dubious without having reason to 
be so. We do not mean to say by 
this that we can get along without 
their support, far fr^m it, but we do 
wish to say that if the paper does not 
reach the demand of some, we would 
beg leave to state that we are "living 
within our means." 

We feel quite sure that most of our 
subscribers are well aware of our 
limits as well as our possibilities, and 
that if subscribers and staff will co- 
operate in thought and criticism, there 
will soon open up larger fields for this 
publication. 

We need the support of every 
alumnus, and it has been very gratify- 



ing to the staff to see how loyally the 
alumni have been responding. To 
get an idea of what some have been 
doing, we would inform our readers 
that all the members of the classes 
"1909" and "1910" have subscribed, 
even some of their ex-members. That 
is just how important they deem their 
connection with their alma mater. 

Alumnus, if you are in touch with 
classmate or a friend who is not 
getting the "News," write to him 
immediately and impress upon his 
mind, bow necessary his subscription 
is for any growth or advancement in 
its columns. 

We are open to suggestions at any 
time, and you may feel sure that as 
soon as every alumnus and student 
puts himself on record as a worker for 
better "News," the staff will not be 
guilty of keeping it back. 

Consevatory of Music 

The cloaing recital by students of 
the Conservatory will be given Thurs- 
day, December 15th, at 8:00 p. m. in 
Engle Auditorium. The public is cor- 
dially invited to attend. 

The November Recital Class was 
given on the 15th, the following 
appearing on the program : Piano solos , 
Misses Myrl Behney, Maude Kershner, 
Bertha Spessard, Grace Smith, Kath- 
erine Mozor, Anna Fry and Mr. G. 
Frederick Botts. Songs, Miss Helen 
Brightbill and Mr. Botts. Organ, 
Misses Ora Bachman and Ruth Det- 
weiler. 

Miss Alice Keath, Penrvn, Pa. 
visited Miss Meda Diehm at the Ladies' 
Hall recently. 

Some very promising material has 
been lined up for Glee Club and re- 
hearsals are in progress. Good tenor 
voices will still receive consideration. 

Miss Katherine Mozer has been absent 
from classes the past week due to 
sickness. 

Present to Clios 

We are glad to announcce that the 
Clionian society has recently received a 
valuable dictionary for use at the 
critic's desk. This was the gift of 
Miss Dodge, and is only one of the 
many ways in which she is constantly 
expressing her sympathy for, and desire 
to help, the student body. 



Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. 

The leader of the very interesting 
joint session was Miss Edna Yarkers. 
The topic under disussion was "Mis- 
sions in Africa." Miss Yarkers 
showed how important Africa is for 
Christian missions. She also pointed 
out how very critical this period is 
in Christian missions. 

The Y. W. C. A. quartette then 
rendered a selection which was very 
much appreciated. Mr Leibold followed 
with a talk on "The Need of Industrial 
Missions in Africa.." He clearly 
showed that in order to permanently 
insure the success of missions, mis- 
sionaries must teach the natives to 
work. Work is the basis of real in- 
dependence. 

Miss Spessard gave a report of the 
United Bretl ren activities in their mis- 
sionary work of Africa. 

An interesting discussion followed in 
which Professor Shenk pointed out the 
great work that Lebanon Valley has 
done, and is doing for Africa. He 
also showed what requirements are 
necessary for a missionary to-day. 
Among other things ,a missionary must 
be broad minded, he must study 
primitive races and lay special stress 
on the industrial training of the con- 
verted heathen. This meeting was 
well attended and everyone enjoyed the 
program which was well rendered. 

Mathematical Round Table 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
mathematicael Round Table was held 
on Wednesday evening, in Professor 
Lehman's recitation room. 

Lester Spessard presented the 
"Theory of Limits. " He read several 
short articles on the subject and made 
appropriate comments . As this 
subject is one of vital interest to all 
mathematicians, it called forth a very 
animated disccussion. One phase of it 
was the age at which students are 
able to grasp the Theory of Limits, 
and the advisability of its being taught 
in high schools. 

John Lehman read a very interesting 
paper on ' ' The Relation of mathematics 
to other Sciences." He showed par- 
ticularly its importance in Physics, 
Chemistry and Astronomy. 

The interest in the Round Table is- 
steadily growing. Several new mem- 
bers were added at this meeting. 



I 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



CLIO-PHILO JOINT SESSION 
Piano Duet, Mae Meyer, Ruth Det- 
weiler; Origial Story, S.B. Plummer; 
Vocal solo, Florence Roland; Essay, 
Edna Yarkers ; Sketch, Edith McCurdy, 
Helen Brightbill, L. A. Rodes, A. H. 
Weigel ; quartet, Bertha Spessard, 
LottieSpessard, L. L. Spessard, E. A. 
Spessard; Parody, Helen Weidler; 
Oration, G. A. Richie; Olive Branch, 
Living Thoughts; Piano solo, Mary 
Spayd. 

KALOZETEAN 
Current Events, Mason Long ; Essay } 
G. A. Williams; Basket Ball Season, 
J. F. Reed: Octette; Eulogy, Paul 
Strickler; Examiner, Editor. Visit- 
ors welcome. 



Matters Historical 



EARLY HISTORY OF THE COL- 
LEGE IN THE LIGHT OF THE 
CONTEMPORARY PRESS 

CORNER STONE LAID 
The corner stone of the new col- 
lege edifice was laid on the twenty- 
third ult. Impressive ceremonies were 
conducted by Rev. W. S. Keys. The 
scripture lesson being read by President 
Vickroy and Rev. George A. Marks 
Jr. After the ceremonies the audience 
marched in procession to the United 
Brethren Church where an able address 
was delivered by the Hon. J. P. 
Wickersham, State Superintendent of 
public schools. Senor Sarmiento, 
Minister Plenipotentiary of Argentine 
Republic to the United States and can- 
didate for President of his own coun- 
try, was present, being on a tour of 
investigation of the public school sys- 
tem of this country. 

Everything passed off delightfully, 
and the friends of the college are very 
cheerful, being certain of success. 

Lebanon Valley College is a regular- 
ly chartered institution and will soon 
rank among the first colleges of the 
state. During the last year the insti- 
tution has met with so much encourage- 
ment that its freinds have concluded to 
add another building which we under- 
stand is to be one of the largest and 
perhaps the most elegantly planned in 
this state. Prof. T. R. Vickroy, the 
President of the college, is a gentleman 



of fine attainments and a live teacher. 
He has won the affections of all the 
students and he is assisted by teachers, 
all of whom stand high in their respec- 
tive departments. We take pleasure 
in recommending this institution to 
parents who desire to educate their sons 
and daughters, Parties desiring a 
circular showing the design of the new 
building and grounds should addiess 
Rev. T. R.Vickory, Annville, Pa. 
—From Commercial Monthly, York, 
Pa., Sept. 1, 1867. 



Ex- L. V. Man State Star Foot 
Ball Player 

Rex John, the 19-year old Wilkins- 
burg athlete, the star fullback ofOtter- 
bein University, by his good all- 
round work won a place on the All" 
Ohio team at fullback. 

His playing has been close to marve- 
lous starring in every game, being 
the only man to cross Ohio State's 
Goal line during the entire season, 
State playing such teams as Michigan, 
Cincinnati and Oberlin. John is not 
only good on account of his terrifiic line 
plunging, but is also good because of 
long end runs. Not only is he apt in 
that department of the game, but also 
ranks as a classy kicker. His punting 
has been splendid, and he has also 
proved himself a good goal kicker. 

Much of the credit for John's play- 
ing is due to coach Exendine, of 
Carlisle, All American end for 1906. 
now coach at Otterbein. He has 
developed John in a remarkable manner, 
and this famous exponent of the open 
game claims that John could make any 
team in the country. 

John was a member of the class of 
1910 at L. V. In his freshman year 
he was varsity full back. He was 
then 15 years old. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



Freshman-Sophomore Foot- 
ball Game 

On Tuesday, Nov. 22, a hard-fought 
football game took place on the College 
Gridiron when the Freshman and Soph- 
omore classes met in their annual con- 
test. The Sophomore team was handi- 
capped by their lack of weight and ex- 
perience, both of which were the Fresh- 
men's strong points. The Sophomores 
had an entirely green line, while the 
Freshmen had seven varsity players. 
The Freshmen also cut-weighed their 
opponents about ten pounds to the man. 
Kreider, Hummel, Light, and Biever 
starred for the victors while the tack- 
ling of B. I ight, E. Loser and Richie 
and the punting of Heffelfinger were 
the mainstays of the Sophomores. 
All of the scoring was dene in the first 
half/the plucky Sophs preventing their 
heavier opponents from scoring in the 
second. The final score was 22-0 in 
favor of the Freshmen. The line-up : 
Freshmen Sophomore 
Schmidt(Walters) 1 e Shearer 
Reddick 1 t Klinger 

Snavely (Harnish) 1 g Boughter 
Rodes c B. Light 

Walters (Stager) r g Ulrich 
Biever r t Potter 

Strickler r e Mulhollen 

Kreider (Capt.) q b Richie 
Charlton (Schmidt) r h b E. Loser 
Hummel 1 h b Heffelfinger 

A. Light f b P. Loser (Capt) 

Touchdowns, Kreider 2, Hummel, 
Light. Goals from touch-downs Kreider 
2. Referees Lehman and Hensel ; 
Umpires, Hensel and Lehman ; Head 
Linesman, Butterwick; Field judge, 
Marshall; time of Periods, 10 minutes. 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 



(Continued from page 1) 



Dr. Ralph Engle, '05, Mr. F. E. 
Schaeffer, '10. 

Mr. George W. Gensemer announces 
the marriage of his daughter, Catha- 
rine May, to Mr. Homer Daniel Sarge, 
on Wednesday, November twenty-third 
at Pine Grove, Pennsylvania. Mis s 
Genesmer entered the conservatory 
in '04. 



Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Seniors Guests 



SOPHOMORES ENTERTAIN IN 
FINE STYLE 

One of the most pleasant features of 
the social side of College life this year 
was held on Tuesday evening, Novem- 
ber 22, when the Sophomores banqueted 
the Seniors. By eight o'clock a large 
majority of the members of both 
classes had arrived at the home of 
Florence Christeson, '13, where the 
festivities were held. 

At a given signal the parlors re- 
sounded with the Sophomore yell, which 
was immediately answered by the 
Seniors. The evening was spent in 
music and various games, after which 
very delightful refreshments were serv- 
ed. Toasts were by no means lacking. 
G. A. Richie, 13, acted as toast- 
master, and the following toasts were 
responded to: '11 Boys, SarahjZimmer- 
man; '11 Girls, A. H. Wiegel; '18 
Girls, V. D. Mulhollen; '13 Boys, Clara 
Horn. Fred L Frost, president of the 
class of 1911, responded for the 
Seniors. Mrs. Mary Stehman chap- 
eroned the party. 



Items of Interest 



Pres. Keister delivered an interest- 
ing sermon in the local U. B. Church 
on Sunday morning. 

The Annville P. 0. S. of A. held 
its annual memorial exercises on Sun- 
day afternoon in [the College Chapel 
with a large audience present. Rev. 
Paul D. Witman, pastor of the Luth- 
eran church, delivered the address. 

T. J. Leibold, '12, preached in the 
Cleona U. B. Church on Sunday even- 
ing. 

W. A. Brunner, '11, and P. R. 
Koontz, '11, spent Friday afternoon 
in Lebanon bn business. 

Oliver Butterwick, '12, F. S. Hensel, 
'12, and Prof. H. E. Wanner spent 
Saturday afternoon in Harrisburg. 

Carrie Light, '12, spent Sunday at 
'her home in Jonestown. 



jCebanon UaUey 
College 



First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

a?id Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 

jCawrence Jfeister, SPres. 
ytnnvltle, ZPa. 

Have Your Printing Done by 

TheJournal PublishingCo. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 
When You Want THE BETTER GRADE 

Frederick W. Light 

826 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa, 

Representing 
Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Co. 
Of Milwaukee, Wis. 

CHRISTY- "NIFTY' ' 
POST CARDS 

Stock from New York and Paris 

H. E.SPESSARD'S BOOKSTORE 



Journal Building 



ANNVILLE, PA. 



Hitnvilk national Bank 



Capital - - $100,000.00 
Surplus and Undi- 
vided Profits 122,000.00 
Deposits - - 400,000.00 
Resources - 680,000.00 



j Per Cent. Paid on Special Deposits 



Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 



SCHOOL of \\ 



l The only way to have a friend is to 
She one. — Emerson. 



ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Send for a Catalogue. TROY, N.Y. 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES 1 and CENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 



Students' Discount 



Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 



Standard Steam Laundry and 
Scouring Works 

A. F. Ward "90 Propricter 

27 N. Seventh St. Lebanon Pa. 

Represented at College 

£\ Full line of College Post Cards, 
^ | Writing Papers, Envelopes, Tablets. 

Pens, Pencils, Ink, Pictures, Pen 
nants, Box Paper, Photopaste. Also Eyes 
Examined and Glasses Fitted. 

D. B. SHIFFER 
WEST MAIN STREET ANNVILLE, PA 

The CHAS. H. ELLIOTT 
COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in 
the World 

Commencement Invitations 
Class Day Programs and 
Ciass Pins ■ 



Dance Progrms 
and 

Invitations 
Menus 

Leather Dance 
Cases and 
Covers 




Fraternity 
and 

Class Inserts 
for Annuals 
Fraternity 
and Class 
Stationery 



Wedding Invitations and Calling Cards 
WORKS — 17th STREET and LEHIGH 
AVENUE Philadelphia. 

Represented at L. V. C. by 
W, ALBERT BRUNNER 

Kodaks, Cameras 
and Supplies 

Printing and Developing for Amateurs 

HARPEL'S ART STORE 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Learn Wireless & R. R. Telegraphy 

Shortage of fully 10,000 Operators on account of 
8-hour law and extensive "wireless" develop- 
ments. We operate under direct supervision on 
Telegraph Ofllcials and positively place all stu- 
dents, when qualified. Write for catalogue. 

Nat'l Telegraph Institute 

Cincinnati, Philadelphia Memphis, Davenport 
Ja., Columbia, S. C, Portland. Ore. 



CBe Gallic 0ty 

6wav>mg £o. 



The largest specialists in 
^"•College Engravings in the 
country. 



J 



COI1I1EGE K 



Prof vS H Derickson I 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume II. 



flnnville, Pa., Tuesday, Deeembep 13, 1910 



Jio. 12 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



OLD AD-BUILDING 




ft We present with this issue a picture 
of the old Administration building 
■which was completely destroyed by 
fire on the evening of December 24, 
1904. As the majority of the students 
were at their homes for their Christmas 
vacation when the fire ocurred, the 



personal loss was heavy. Most of 
the valuable records of the College 
were also lost at this time. 

The newly equipped administration 
building which was built immediately 
after the fire is situated on the site of 
the old building. 



My College 

TO LEBANON VALLEY 



College Day 



O college ever noble 

college ever free, 

May all thy sons be willing 

To do their best for thee ! 

The light of God is o'er thee, 
His spirit in thy breast; 
From thee the earth has blessing 
And hope for its opprest. 

No worthy aims go begging 
For aid beside thy door, 
Without receiving plenty 
From out thy lavish store. 

Ihy sons will long remember 
Thy loyalty to right, 
And with tnine inspiration 
For truth will keep the fight. 

college ever noble 
college ever free 
Thine every son is willing 
To do his best for thee. 

Norman C. Schlichter '97. 



LANCASTER COUNTY MINISTER- 
IUM COLLEGE DAY IN 
COUNTY CHURCHES 

According to the recent action of the 
Lancaster County U. B. Ministerium. 
December 11, was set apart as College 
Day, when the cause of Education 
was presented to the people. No 
offerings were asked for, but the 
services of the day were only an in- 
telligent enlistment of the people so 
that in due season they may respond 
both in students and money. 

To achieve the greatest possible 
success, an exchange of pulpits has 
been recommended ever since this day 
has been inaugurated, three yaers ago. 
At no time has any minister in the 
county failed to work the plan. The 
appointments for the exchange of pul. 
pits as adDpted was as follows: 

Columbia a, A. G. Nye, Centerville, 
C. Mease Denver, J. M. Walters; 
Elizabethtown, Fres. L. Keister, morn- 



Calendar. 

Tuesday— Dec. 13, 6 p. m. Prayer 
Meeting. 

Wednesday,— Dec. 14, 7 p. m. 
Biological Field Club. 

Thursday— Dec. 15, 6 p. m. Minis- 
terial Association ; 7 p. m. Mathemati- 
cal Round Table; 8 p. m. Students 
Recital. 

Friday Dec. 6, 7:15 p. m. 
Literary Socitey. 

Sunday— Dec. 18, 1 p. m. Christian 
Associations. 



ing, S. C. Enck evening ; Ephrata. W. 
W. Fredinger Florin, M. H. Wert; 
Hopeland. James Keene; Intercourse, 
E. S. Comrey; Lancaster, Cove- 
nant, R. R. Butterwick, morn- 
ing, J. Warren Kauffman, eve- 
ning; Lancaster, Queen, J. T. Span- 
gler, morning, I. H. Albright, 
evening; Lititz, H. J. Behney ; Manor, 
1. Moyer Hershey ; Manheim, S. S. 
Daugherty; Mountville, A. G. Nye, 
morning; J. T. Spangler, evening; Mt. 
Joy, J. Warren Kauffman, morning; 
Fres. A. L. Keister, evening ; New Hol- 
land, D. E. Long; Peuqea, B. M. 
Breneman; Refton, I. H. Albright, 
morning, R. R. Butterwick, evening; 
St. John's, A. E. Shroyer. 

Many of these men are Alumni of 
the College, and we feel that Lebanon 
Valley was very well presented to the 
people of Lancaster county. 



Biological Field Club 

Thij following program will be ren- 
dered on Wednesday evening, December 
14th in the Bioloigcal Lecture room. 

Observations concerning the habits 
of ants, Chester E. Rettew ; Fossil 
Plants found in coal, Ivan L. Ressler; 
The Effect of temperature on Germina- 
tion, Carrie Light ;The life history and 
economic value of tne Bumble Bee, 
Charles Arndt. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fierjus 

Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITORS-CHIEF 
P. R. KOONTZ, '11 
ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. A. BRUNNER, '11 

E. A. SPESSARD, '11 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
w. o. ELLIS, '11 

F. R. KENNEDY, '12 
CATHARINE E. HERS HEY, '12 

HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
S. O. GRIMM, '12 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
W. A. Brunner, '11, 
ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 

OLIVER BUTTERWICK '12 
PAUL LOSER, '13 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 
to W. A. Brunner, Box 916, all other 
matter to Room 19, Administration 
Building Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

During the past week the local Y. 
M. C. A. received its first official visit 
from the new State Students' Seretary, 
Mr. Irvin E. Deer. We were pleased 
to make the personal acquaintance of 
our new leader, and learn of his plans 
for carrying on the work during the 
new year. 

That the Y. M. C. A. upheld by the 
student bodies of the various Colleges 
over the country are doing a great and 
good work, cannot be gainsaid. Every 
where the influence which results from 
their operations is felt. As a local 
Association, we desire to make this 
influence as great as possible, and 
in order to have this result, the helping 
hand of every College man is needed 
and solicited. The presence of a large 
number of men insures better addresses 
than when the leaders are obliged to 
speak to audiences composed largely 
of vacant chairs. 

The secretary had conferences with 
each committee separately, and gave 
much sound advice relating to the work 
of the various departments. One 
department in which the whf le As- 
sociation is interested is the work in 
the quarries adjacent to Annville. 
This work is being carried on regularly 
and should been encouraged. There is 



no reason why the influence of the Y. 
M. C. A. should not be made to bear 
strongly on those men who cannot even 
speak our language intelligently. 
They learn readily, and every effort 
should be made to help them to the 
light. 

We were pleased to entertain our new 
leader for the few days he remained 
with us. Anyone who heard his splen- 
did address in Chapel on Thursday 
morning can readily see his extreme in- 
terest in his new field of labor. Our 
desire is that he may often visit our 
Association, as he is always very 
welcome. 

Athletic Election 

The winter election of the College 
Athletic Association was held last 
Thursday afternoon in Professor 
Wanner's lecture room with a large 
attendance. As is shown by the 
results, two new departments are 
represented this year, namely, track 
and tennis. The new constitution 
which was adopted in the fall calls for 
these departments. The Track managers 
will begin operations as soon as 
possible for the building of a cinder 
track on the Athletic field. The 
Athletic Association is also working 
to get tennis under its supervision in 
order that the College may be better 
represented in that department. Each 
of these new managers should have all 
the encouragement and asistance that 
it is posisble to give. The results of 
the eleciton are as follows : President, 
C. F-Harnish, '12; Secretary, E. G. 
Loser '13; Football manager, Oliver 
B. Butterwick '12: Ass't football 
manager, G. Richie '13 ; Track manager 

E. A. Spessard '11; Ass't track manag- 
er, E. H. Carmany, '12; Tennis Manag- 
er, Catherine, E. Hershey, '12; 
Ass't Tennis manager , Russel Weidler 
14. 

According to the constitution the 
remaining officers of the Association 
will be elected at the April election. 

The Varsity football men who were 
granted sweaters and Varsity letters 
this year were: F. S. Hensel, '12, 

F. L. Frost, '11, Capt. J.K. Lehman, 
'11, J. E. Marshall, '11, F R. Kenne- 
dy;'^, H. H. Charlton, '14, Warren 
Hayes, '14, W. D. Biever, '14, H. H. 
Kreider, '14, Paul Loser, '13, and 
Manager O. T. Ehrhart '11. 



Y. W. C. A. 

A large number of girls were present 
on Sunday afternoon and enjoed one 
of the best meetings of the year. The 
president opened the meeting with a 
short and spirited song service. Miss 
Florence Roland sang a very beautiful 
solo after which Miss Parks gave a very 
interesting and helpful talk. She is 
deeply interested in soccial problems 
in our great cities and chose that as 
her subject having had personal ex- 
perience in this line, she understands 
conditions as they exist. She said it 
is interesting to note in the Bible how 
much stress the prophets, in their 
preaching place on the oppression of 
the poor. 

The problem is by no means new, 
but it is still facing us, and every true 
Christain must share in righting the 
social evils. 

Every girl present was intensely in- 
terested in Miss Parks' remarks and 
received a broader conception of her 
duty toward her fellowmen. 

New Foot Ball Captain 

Last week the Varsity letter men met 
and elected Forrest S. Hensel," '12, as 
captain of the foot ball team for next 
year. Since a number of new men 
were broken in this year, the prospexts 
for a good team next year are very good. 

Captain Hensel is a good, clean, 
consistent, all-around player, and 
should keep plenty of life in the team. 

He was a star player at the Lykens 
high school, when attending that school 
and has been a Varsity man ever since 
his Freshmen year in College. The 
"News" congratulates Captain 
Hensel, and wishes him a most suc- 
cessful season next year. 

Y. M. C. A. 

The Y. M. C. A. session of Sunday 
afternoon was one^ull of live interest. 
V. D. Mulhollan, the leader, read the 
sixth chapter of Galatians as a lesson, 
and based his remarks on that scripture. 

Many good thoughts were brought out 
along the line of personal responsibility 
and helping each other. The meeting 
was interesting in that a good number 
were present, and several fine addresses 
were made. 

Among those who spoke on different 
phases of the subject we:e Messrs. 
Leibold, L. B. Harnish, Young, 
Murray, Richie and Brunner. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



PHILOKOSMIAN 

Resume, Lester Rodes ; The work of 
the Professional Strike Breaker, J. E. 
Marshall; Debate: Resolved that the 
present method of Taxation is unjust, 
Affirmative, Russel Weidler, Paul 
Loser; Negative, Maurice Leister, 
John Sherk ; Piano solo, W. L. Murray ; 

Does it Pay to be a "Grind"? J. 
K. Lehman ; The value of Cartoons to 
the American People, James Shively. 
KALOZETEAN 

Happenings of the week, Edgar 
Landis; Eulogy, Mason Long; Debate: 
Resolved that the Darwinian Theory 
of Evolution Can be Proved, affirma- 
tive, W. O. Ellis, P. E. Young, Nega- 
tive, P. B. Gibble, G. A Williams; 
Vocal solo, Harry Charlton; Essay 
William Stager; Original story, 
Warren Hayes. Visitors welcome. 

Prof. S. H. Derickson of the 
department of Biology made a business 
trip to Philadelphia on last Wedesdav 
and Thursday. 

CLIONIAN 

Piano Solo, Maud Kershner; Reading, 
Katharine Clauser; Christmas Story 
Contest, Edith Morrison, Helen Bright- 
bill, Blanch Risser; Vocal solo, Verda 
Snyder; Christmas Reading, Nellie 
Seltzer ; Retrospects and Anticipations, 
Edith Lehman ; Piano solo, Vera Myers 

Cilo- Philo Joint Session 

The first joint session of the year 
between the Clionian and Philokosmian 
societies was held in Philo Hall with 
Philo officers presiding on Friday 
evening December 9, and was quite a 
successful and pleasant occasion. At 
7:30 when all were comfortably seated 
the program was introduced and each 
number was excellently rendered. The 
program : Piano Duett, Mae Meyer, 
Ruth C. Detweiler; Original Story, S. 
B. Plummer; Vocal Solo, Edith Ging- 
Gingrich : Essay Edna Yarkers ; Sketch, 
Edith McCurdy, Helen Brightbill, L. 
A. Rodes, A. H. Weigel; Quartet, 
Bertha S. pessard, Lottie Spessard, L. 
L. Spessard, E. A. Spessard; Parody, 
Helen Weidler ; Oration, G.A. Richie; 
Olive Branch, Living Thoughts; Piano 
Solo, Mary Spayd. 

At the conclusion of the program 
refreshments were served and the next 
hour was spent in a very informal way 
while a general good time went round. 



Conservatory of Music 

The following is the program for the 
students' recital Thursday evening 
December 15th, 1910. 8 :00 p. m. Engle 
Auditorium. Deshayes— March in D. 
major, organ, Miss Ora Bachman ; Mac- 
Dowell— Improvisation, pianoforte, 
Miss Bertha Spessard ; Raff— LaFileuse 
pianoforte, Miss Marion Light; Nevin 
— 'Twas April, song, Miss Helen 
Brightbill ; Dennee— Springtime, 
pianoforte, Miss Susan Frantz; Chopin 
—Nocturne, Op 55, pianoforte, Mis s 
Sara Strickler; Nigri— By Moonlight, 
Vocal trio, Misses Fink, L. Spessard, 
and Mr. Botts; Calkins — Harvest 
Thanksgiving March, organ, Miss Ruth 
Detweiler; Arensky Bigarrure, 
pianoforte, Miss Meda Diehm ; Willeby 
—The Hour, song. Miss Eva Foltz; 
Schutt— Tendre Aveu, pianoforte, Miss 
Edith Gingrich ; Sparrow— When 
Violets their fragrance spill, song, 
Miss Katherine Fink; Kirchner— 
Polonaise, two pianos, Misses A. 
Fry and K. Gingrich ; Vincent— Jolly 
Winter, Ladies Chorus, Misses E. 
Gingrich, Roland. Brightbill, Fink, 
Weidman, Foltz, K. Gingrich, Ely, 
L. Spessard, Bachman, Kershner 
Light, an-i Spayd. 

The public is cordially invited to the 
above named recital. 

Ten Volumes of "The American 
History and Encyclopedia of Music" 
have been presented to the Conservatory 
of Music through the generosity of the 
Mendelssohn Club and other students 
of the Conservatory. The volumes 
are given to musical biography, two 
volumes to operas, one volume to ora- 
torios and masses, others on Theory, 
American Music, Musical Instru- 
ments, Foreign Music and a Dictionary 
of Musical Terms. 



Farmers' Week 



. Notice to Subscribers 

The anniversary of the first number 
of the "News" will soon occur. With 
that number the term of many of our 
subscribers will expire. We thank 
you for your past patronage and 
earnestly request that you renew your 
subscription immediately. 



Oxford University in England, after 
a thousand years' exstience as an 
institution for men alone, t/ill admit 
women hereafter. The same conditions 
will be required of women as of men. 



PENN. STATE COLLEGE HOLDS 
ANNUAL EVENT 

At the request of the School of 
Agriculture and Experiment Station 
Pennsylvania State College, we pub- 
lish the following article: 

"Farmers' Week at The Pennsyl- 
vania State College will be held this 
year December 19 to 24th, inclusive. 

A splendid opportunity is offered to 
all farmers interested in a better 
agriculture. Lectures on live topics 
will be given by men who have practical 
experience as viell as scientific know- 
ledge. In addition to the lectures, 
many practical demonstrations in judg- 
ing dairy cattle, beef cattle, horses, 
sheep, swine and poultry will be given. 

The program is so arranged that any 
individual can attend lectures during 
each period upon the subjects which 
interest him most. 

"Many of the speakers are men of 
national prominence in their respective 
lines from this and other states. Every 
farmer, who can possibly do so, should 
arrange to spend at least a part of 
the week in getting into touch with 
this practical science which is offered, " 



Outlook for Track 

The new track manager contemplates 
building a new quarter-mile track 
around the athletic field and running a 
short season. This track will cost a 
great deal of money if the manager 
has to depend upon out siders to do the 
work at several dollars per day. But 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 



Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



COLLEGE NEWS 



other institutions have made tracks by 
the manual labor of their students and 
it is the hope of the manager that when 
the call is made, a holiday will be 
established by the authorities and that 
every male student will report on the 
athletic field for business. This happy 
day will not be ordered for a month 
or so, but let every student goad 
himself until then with keenest antici- 
pation for that event. 



Items of Interest 





Don't forget to include the COL- 
LEGE NEWS in your Christmas pre- 
sents. 

Lebanon Valley College has been 
recognized by the State SupremeCourt 
to the extent that graduates who wish 
to study law are not required to take 
the preliminary law examination before 
entering a law school. 

A large College pennant has been 
presented to the Boys' Department 
of the Kensington Y. M. C. A. recent- 
ly. The management of that depart- 
ment requested that this be done, as 
he is collecting pennants from Univer- 
sities, Colleges, Preparatory and High 
Schools, with two purposes in view. 
One is to decorate their rooms, and 
the other is that the pennants may 
be a constant reminder to the boys of 
the possibility of a higher education. 

Ralph RiegeL who was at his home 
at Millersburg since Thanksgiving 
returned to school last week . 

Coach H. M. Forrest, of Lancaster, 
spent Saturday and Sunday with friends 
at the College. 

A number of students enjoyed a 
coasting party on "Gravel Hill" last 
Saturday evening. Those in the party 
were Misses Horn, Lottie Spessard, 
Lehman, Yarkers, Weidler, and Lau, 
and Messrs Lehman, Richie, Ehrhart, 
Shively, Plummer and Koontz. The 
party was chaperoned by Miss Parks. 

Prof. H. E. Wanner and F. S. Hen- 
sel, '12, spent Saturday afternoon at 
Harrisburg. 

Harry Denlinger enteitained his 
father and R^v. M. H. Wert, a former 
student on Friday. Roth these gentle- 
men enjoyed the Philo-Clio joint 
session on Friday evening. 

The Sophomores received their class 
jerseys last week. The body is crimson, 
and the numerals, '13, are steel. 



oCebanon UaHey 
College 



First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Halt are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 
jCawrence Jfeister, ZPres. 

Have Your Printing Done by 

TheJournal PublishingCo. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 
When You Want THE BETTER GRADE 

Frederick W. Light 

826 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa, 

Representing 
Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Co. 
Of Milwaukee, Wis. 

CHRISTY- "NIFTY' ' 
POST CARDS 

Stock from New York and Paris 

H. E. SPESSARD'S BOOK STORE 

Journal Building ANNVILLE, PA. 

flnnville national Bank 

Capital - - $100,000.00 
Surplus and Undi- 
vided Profits 122,000.00 
Deposits - - 400,000.00 
Resources - 680,000.00 

j Per Cent. 'Paid on Special Deposits 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

%, SCHOOL of \\ 
ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Send for a Catalogue. TROY, N.Y. 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES 1 and GENTS 1 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 



Students' Discount 



Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 



Standard Steam Laundry and 
Scouring Works 

A. F. Ward '90 Proprieter 

27 N. Seventh St. Lebanon Pa. 

Represented at College 

£\ Full line of College Post Cards, 
^ | Writing Papers, Envelopes, Tablets. 

Pens, Pencils, Ink, Pictures, Pen 
nants, Box Paper, Photopaste. Also Eyes 
Examined and Glasses Fitted. 

- D. B. SHIFFER 
WEST MAIN STREET ANNVILLE, PA 

The CHAS. H. ELLIOTT 
COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in 
the World 

Commencement • Invitations 
Class Day Programs and 
Class Pins 



Dance Progrms 
and 

Invitations 
Menus 

Leather Dance 
Cases and 
Covers 




Fraternity 
and 

Class Inserts 
for Annuals 
Fraternity 
and Class 
Stationery 



Wedding Invitations and Calling Cards 
WORKS— 17th STREET and LEHIGH 
AVENUE Philadelphia. 

Represented at L. V. C. by 
W. ALBERT BRUNNER 

Kodaks. Cameras 
and Supplies 

Printing and Developing for Amateurs 

HARPEL'S ART STORE 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Learn Wireless & R. R. Telegraphy 

Shortage of fully 10,000 Operators on account of 
8-hour law and extensive "wireless" develop- 
ments. We operate under direct supervision on 
Telegraph Officials and positively place all stu- 
dents, when qualified. Write for catalogue. 

Nat'I Telegraph Institute 

Cincinnati, Philadelphia Memphis, Davenport 
la., Columbia, 8. C, Portland. Ore. 



Cfie Ckctric 0tV 
Gngravina £o. 



#T The largest specialists in 
^-•College Engravings in the 
country. 



COLLEGE I 



1 



Prof S H Dericksou i - ton 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Volume II. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, December 20, 1910 



Jio. 13 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



Biological Field Club 

Last Wednesday evening the Biolo- 
gical Field Club rendered its program 
for the month of December, in the 
lecture room of the Biological depart- 
ment. 

Chester E. Rettew, reported some 
accurate and interesting observations 
on the habits of ants, which he collected 
during the summer months. 

Miss Carrie Light read a well pre- 
pared paper relating to the effect of 
temperature on the germination of 
seeds. 

Charles H. Amdt gave the club the 
life history, economic value and other 
facts concerning the bumble-bae. 

Albert Barnhart, read a splendid 
paper on the different methods of 
fertilization among plants. 

The program was one cf the best the 
Club rendered this year. Every person 
should avail himself of the opportunity 
and become a member of this organiza- 
tion. 

Following the program officers were 
elected for the succeeding year. They 
are: Preisdent, J. F. Reed; Vice 
President, Miss Carrie Light; 
Secretary, Miss Edna Yarkers; 
Treasurer, Prof. S. H. Derickson. 



Mathematical Round Table 

The Mathmetical Round Table held 
its regular monthly meeting in Pro- 
fessor Lehman's Recitation Rooms, on 
Wednesday evening. Greater interest 
and enthusiasm was manifested in this 
meeting than in any previous one held 
this year. 

Paul Loser read an interesting 
Biography of Kepler. He pointed out 
the importance of Kepler's work as a 
foundation for the work of later 
mathematicans and scientists. 

''The Preparation Necessary for a 
Teacher in Secondary Schools" was 
presented by Miss Edna Kilmer. The 
standard she set was a high one, but no 



one present thought that it should be 
lowered in the least. 

Jesse Reed demonstrated five 
methods, not usually found in text- 
books, of proving the Pythagorean Pro- 
position. This is one of the most in- 
teresting propositions in Mathematics, 
as there are nearly fifty methods of 
proof. 

The members of the Round Table 
were glad to see so many visitors 
Present and extend to them a hearty 
invitation to come again. 



Star Course 

The Star Course committee offer as 
their next attraction, The Dudley Buck 
Concert Company. 

They will present "A Musical 
Review consisting of Grand Opera 
Selections, Sacred Numbers, Special 
songs in Costume, Ladies Quartete, 
Duets and Trios including Baritone, 
and Southern Melodies with Banjo and 
Guitor Accompaniment. 

The personel of their company is 
excellent, every member being an 
artist. They have been well trained by 
the Famous Dudley Buck Jr. , and will 
certainly giva us a fine musical treat 
for the newyear. Don't forget the date, 
nor fail to be present at the Engle 
Hall January 5, 1911. Admission 35 
cen's Reserved Seats 10 cents extra. 



Ministerial Association 

The last ministerial meeting for 
the old year was held on Thursday 
evening at the home of P. F. Roberts, 
and was very well attended. Routine 
business was transacted, and one new 
member was admitted to the Associa- 
tion, making an enrollment of twenty- 
two active members. Prof. A. E. 
Shroyer read a very interesting paper 
on "The hired Evangelist and the 
Pastor." The paper was much ap- 
preciated and a lively discussion 
followed . 



Calendar. 

December 22 to January 4— Vaca- 
tion. 

Thursday, January 5, 8 p. m.— Star 
Course. 

Friday, January 6, 7:15 p. m. — 
Literary Societies. 

Sunday, January 10, lp. m.— Chris- 
tian Associations. 




Alumni 




The home of Supt. J. H. Reber Ph. 
D. 'G5 ; of the Waynesboro public 
schools, was saddened by the death of 
their eleven year old daughter, Helen, 
from diptheria, on the morning of Dec. 
7th. 

A. Louise Kreider, '08, Conservatory, 
a student at Wells College, Aurora, 
N. Y. returned to the home of her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. R. Kreider, 
on Friday, to spend her Christmas 
vacation. Miss Frost, a classmate of 
Miss Kreider, will be her guest over 
the holidays. 

Elizabeth Meckley, '09, academy 
and Myrtle Garret, '10, both of 
Hummelstown, attended the meeting 
of the Clionian Literary Society on 
Friday evening. 

Mr. Fred S. Smith, '10, Conservatory, 
director of the Conservatory of Sugar 
Grove Seminary, is spending several 
days with friends, at the college, 
prior to returning to his home at 
Chambersdurg. 

Stanley R. Oldham, '08, an in- 
structor in Bates College, Maine, will 
arrive on Saturday, Dec. 24, to spend 
the holidajs with friends here. 

Max F. Lehman, '07, an instructor 
at Lafayette College is home for his 
Christmes vacation. 

Continued on page 2 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College flecus 

Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

P. R. KOONTZ, '11 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. A. BRUNNER, '11 

E. A. SPESSARD, '11 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
W. O, ELLIS, '11 

F. It. KENNEDY, '12 
CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, '12 

, HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
S. O. GRIMM, '12 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
W. A. Brunner, '11, 
ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 
OLIVER BUTTER WICK '12 - 
PAUL LOSER, '13 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies j cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 els. 



Address all business communications 
to W. A. Brunner. Box 916, all other 
matter to Room 19, Administration 
Building - Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

Owing to the Christmas vacation the 
next number of the College News will 
appear January 10, 1911. The 'NEWS' 
extends to all subscribers, and friends 
i's heartiest wishes for a Merry Christ- 
mas and a Happy New Year. 

Has the past season of athletics 
been a failure? This question may be 
answered in two ways. To those who 
are not intimately acquainted with the 
situation and hence cannot_undertsand 
the real causes, the immediate results 
must be far from satisfactory. When 
the true facts in the case are con- 
sidered however the worst features are 
to a certain extent smoothed over. 

It is true that some of the greatest 
victories in history have been preceeded 
by conditions, which from any im- 
mediate conclusion would have presaged 
utter defeat. We must bear in mind 
that Appomattox was the conclusion 
of the struggle in which Bull Run was 
the beginning, and yet after Bull Run 
all the way to Appomattox the hearts 
of many brave men were utterly deject- 
ed, nor were they to blame. Some men, 
however could see thru the clouds of 
smoke and beheld a glorious vision. As 
the days passed the number of these 
men increased. The defeats caused 



the true lines of battle to be drawn, 
the true nature of the conflict 
upon all, and a spirit of strongest 
downward determination swetpt the 
arms of our nation to victory. Without 
the dark struggle the final victory 
would lose much of its glory. 

The greatest crisis in the history of 
our athletic circles is now on. Some of 
our best men are discouraged and from 
their view point they inave just cause 
so to be. But there are some features 
of our situation that are most grati- 
fying. We have a new constitution 
which promises to become most useful in 
giving all our athletics a definite and 
approved status. The intense feeling 
aroused by our recent season has turned 
the eyes of those men who are in a 
position to remedy matters in the 
proper direction. All see that without 
athletics our institution must fail and 
that to have a successful season we 
must have the hearty co-operation of 
the President, faculty and student 
body. 

True lines of battle are being drawn. 
Sentiment is rapidly crystallizing in 
such a manner that in the very near 
future every one connected, with ovir 
institution will be compelled to take a 
definite position, and in spite of sup- 
posed sympathies and ' good wishes 
either take a firm stand for athletics 
or bring upon his acts the censure and 
condemnation that they would so justly 
deserve. In this case the censure will 
not be the voice of the student body, 
alone, but the expression of those who 
have the power to act as ' well as criti- 
cize 

To attempt to build up a pro- 
gressive college without in the least 
considering the vital question of 
athletics or at the very most, relega- 
ting them to the last place on the pro- 
gram is a policy that is sure to bring 
final ruin. The day for conservatism 
is past and the day for hearty co- 
poration of the alumni, authorities and 
student body at hand. Shall we take 
advatnage of the present crisis and form 
a definite agressive athletic policy for 
our college, our Alma Mater or shall 
we stand idly by and let our very in- 
difference bring about our final de- 
struction ? 

Let every one who has the welfare 
of Lebanon Valley at heart act on this 
most momentous question. 



Notice to Subscribers 

Please examine the label on your 
"News" and if the term of subscrip- 
tions expires with this issue kindly re- 
new it immed ; ately. Your name will 
not be taken from the list unless you 
order it so. We thank you for your 
past favors and trust that they may 
continue. 

We thank all who have in any way 
contributed to its success. Your sug- 
gestions have been kindly received, 
your words of encouragement have 
lessened our burdens and helped us to 
make the News a success. As we 
enter on the new year we do so with 
a determination to lend our assistance 
to any project that tends to elevate 
our institution and to fearlessly attack 
all measures that tend to cripple or in 
any way limit its sphere of usefulness. 

Keep in touch with the College. 
Subscribers for the News. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

Continued from page 1 

Mr. Deleth E, Weidler, '09, of 
Anderson, Ind will spend Christmas, 
at the home of his uncle A, B. 
Weidler, at Mexico, Missouri. 

J. C. Strock, '10, a teacher in the 
St. Charles Military Academy, St. 
Charles, Mo. has been commissioned 
major bv the state government. Maj. 
Strock will spend his vacation at the 
home of his mother in Mechanicsburg. 
Pa. 

Edith N. Freed, '10, of Hawley, 
Pa., will arrive on Saturday Dec. 24, 
to spend Christmas at the home of her 
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob 
Nissley of Hershey 

Mr. George N. Hoffer, '09, an in- 
structor in Biology, at Purdue 
Univeristy, will spend hib vacation at 
his home in Hummelstown. 

Oratory Recital 

The first Oratory recital under the 
new director of the department, Miss 
May Belle Adams, wil be given early 
in the winter term. The reciatl will 
consist largely of single readings to be 
given by members fo the department. 
No exact date has been set, rendition 
of this program as near Jan. 12, as 
possible. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



CLIONIAN 
"JCLIUS CAESAR" 

Piano solo, Sara Strickler; Review 
of Julius Caesar, Lottie Spessard; 
Reading, Helen Weidler; Act J, 
Scenes I and II, Misses Snyder, 
Yarkers, McCurdy, Klauser ,and 
Smith; Vocal Duet, Ora Bachman, 
Edith Gingrich; Act I, Scene III, 
Misses Smith, Yarkers, Klauser, and 
Brightbill; Piano Duet, Anna Fry 
Katie Gingrich; Olive Branch, Editor. 
PHILOKOSMIAN 

Current News, D. Ellis Zimmeman ; 
Present Political Conditions in England, 
P. R. Koontz ; Debate : Resolved that 
railway rates should he raised, Affir- 
maitive H. Kreider, Amos Weigle, 
Negative C. C. Smith, G.. A. Richie; 
Vocal Solo, L. A. Rodes; Tolstoi: 
"His Works", W. C. Shoop; Living 
Thoughts, Editor. 

KALOZETEAN 
Happenings of the week, James 
Miller; Origional Story, Clyde Eby ; 
Chorus, Society; Debate: Resolved 
that Government ownership of all 
transportation Companies is better than 
by Independent Monopolies, Affirma- 
tive, H. E. Snavely, 

Negative, Charles Ulrich, 

Frank Shearer ; Autobiography, Victor 
M. Heffelfinger ; Examiner by the- 
Editor, William Dunlap; Chorus, 
Society. 



Officers Installed 



KALOZETEAN 

At a recent business meeting of the 
society the following officers were 
elected: President F. L. Frost: "We 
President, C. E. Rettew ; Recording 
Secretary, J. W. Ischy ; Corresponding 
Secretary, H. E. Snavely ; Critic, W. 
O. Ellis; Pianist, Paul Strickler, 
Eidtor, William Dunlap; Sergeant-at- 
arms, Carl Schmidt; Assistant Ser- 
geant-at-arms. Mason Long. 

CLIONIAN 

President, Verda Snyder; Vice 
President, Helen Weidler; Rec. Sec- 
retary, Lottie Spessard ; Cor. Sec- 
retary, Vera Myers; Critic, Edna 
Kilmer; Editor, Florence Clippinger : 
Pianist, Cra Bachman ; Chaplain Lizzie 
Lau; Judges. Grace Smith, Kathryn 
Clauser. 



Missionary Meeting 

JOINT SESSION OF THE Y. M. 
AND Y. W. C. A. 

On Sundaj afternoon we were 
pleased to have Miss Brown address the 
meeting, Miss Brown is a Traveling 
Secretary of the Student Volunteer 
Movement. She showed in a very 
interesting manner the great world 
movements that are taking place today. 

She told us of the great meetings 
that are being held in all parts of the 
world and their significance to us as a 
Christian peopie. 

She quoted from n any great men of 
world wide fame to show the importance 
of Missions. Kings and Emperors, 
Presidents and the greatest leaders 
ofjhe world today realize the great 
good that Missions will acccomplish. 

Liss Brcwn contrasted very'' well 
the intense interest that many Chinese 
and other non-Christian people take in 
the Christian religion, as compared 
with many in our land. 

She s t. 3 scarcity of the 

workmen in comparison tothemagni- 
tude'of the task, quoting statistics to 
prove her case. Her illustrations of the 
great resources of these non-Christian 
pecple w.ere very apt and startling. 

The leader pointed out two great crise s 
that gave to the twentieth century a 
cerrair, individuality. 

The great awakening at home in the 
cause of missions, and the interest 
in foreign missions. 

She showed the crowded con- 
dition of the field at home, 
the need and smallness of the number 
of the workers in the foreign fields and 
the practical nature of this work with 
the large field ready for the harvest. 
The challenge was given to all Christian 
students to awaken to the full realiza- 
tion of their responsibilities. 

To take a greater interest i 
cause, because of the practib of 
this movement and the critical nature 
of the present crisis. 

In conclusion, Miss Brr wn illustrated 
the requirements of the present 
situation by a story. By means 
she showed that it was not scep- 
ticism, dogmatism or emotionalism, 
but practical methods that will solve 
this great issue. Every one present 
was intensely interested in her talk. 



Miss Brown practises what she preache 
for she will soon go to China in obe- 
dience to the Divine command "Go ye 
therefore, and teach all nations." 



Mission Class Ent>ert>ained 

On Saturday evening, Mrs. Keister 
very pleasantly entertained the 
Mission Study Class of the Y. W. C. 
A. 

This class has been devoting its time, 
during the fall term, to a careful study 
of South America. 

Mrs. Keister, as leader of the class, 
has made the work very interesting and 
instructive. 

A portion of Saturday evening? 
was given to a brief summary of the 
work covered, after which a pleasant 
social time was enjoyed. 



The New Reading Room 

The members of the Y. W. C. A. 
have recently opened a reading room 
on the third floor of the Ladies Dormi- 
tory, contributions in the line of 
books or furnishings will be gratefully 
received.- The room will be'open all 
the time and it is desired that the 
girls make good use of it. 



Items of Interest 



The Christmas vacation begins on 
Thursday morning Dec. 22 at 7:45 
o'clock and ends Wednesday morning 
January 4 at 8;45 o'clock. Let all 
students bear this date in mind and 
be on hand for classes, as the success 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 




Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



COLLEGE NEWS 



of a term" s work depends largely on the 
beginning. f 

P. R. Koontz visited at his home 
in West Fairview over Saturday and 
Sunday. 

D. E. Young filled the pulpit of the 
Hebron U. B. Church on Sunday 
morning. Rev. O. T. Ehrhart is 
pastor of this church. 

Rev. Mark Wert is contemplating 
the renewal of his studies at the college 
at the opening of the next term. 

Messrs. John Lehman, '11, Edward 
Marshall, '11, Roger Saylor, '11, C. C. 
Smith, '12, and Earle Carmany, '12, 
were royally entertained by Forrest 
Hensel at his home in Lykens on lait 
Friday evening. The boys all did 
justice to the fine turkey supper that 
Mr. HensePs mother had prepared for 
them. 

Florence Roland who has been pur- 
suing a course at the Conservatory, 
returned to her home at Reading on 
JMonday. 

Vera Meyers left for her home at 
Longsdorf, Cumberland county, last 
Saturday to spend the Chistmas vaca- 
tion. 

New classes in Missions and Bible 
Study will be stated the beginning 
of the next term by the Y. M. C. A. 

The Y. W. C. A. will take up Bible 
Study to replace the Mission Study 
just closed. A large attendance at 
these classes is desired. 

Quite a large number of our 
students have taken advantage of the 
splendid coasting on Cemetery hill the 
past week. The brilliant moonlight 
helped to make this an ideal sport. 

Mr. Max Wingerd ex '12, and a 
present student in Washington and 
Jefferson spent a few days with friends 
at the college. 

Miss Morrison, '14, returned to her 
home in Mt. Pleasant Pa., on last 
Friday. 

Mr. Ivan Potter left on Friday for 
Long 'Island City. Mr. Potter is in- 
terested in examinations for city school 
work. 

Mr. Rfssler, left fcr the holidays on 
Friday. Mr. Kiester is spenndig some 
time with him. 

Samuel Plummer, '12, and Claude 
Reddick, '14, made a business trip to 
Lebanon last Saturday evening. 



jCebanon TSallei/ 
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